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The Number Ones: Tommy Edwards’ “It’s All In The Game”
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Bob Roman
2018-11-03 02:24:58 UTC
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A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.

Tommy Edwards – “It’s All In The Game”
HIT #1: September 29, 1958
STAYED AT #1: 6 weeks

In 1911, a Chicago bank president named Charles G. Dawes wrote a piece of instrumental music called “Melody In A Major.” He showed his sheet music to a friend, who then took it and got it published, and it became a popular piece of sheet music. 14 years later, Dawes was elected vice president of the United States of America under Calvin Coolidge. And in 1951, the same year that Dawes died, a Brill Building songwriter named Carl Sigman used “Melody In A Major” as the basis for “It’s All In The Game,” a song about the fickle and difficult nature of love. People like Louis Armstrong and Nat King Cole recorded versions of the song, and so did a Virgina-born singer and songwriter named Tommy Edwards.

Edwards took that 1951 version of “It’s All In The Game” into the top 20, but he didn’t hit #1 with it until seven years later, after other singers like Elvis Presley had made hits with songs that Edwards had written. Carl Sigman’s son Michael wrote this article (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/field-notes-from-a-music_b_5722980.html) about how his father, who hated rock ‘n’ roll, and the MGM Records A&R Harry Meyerson, who hated it more, figured out a way to gently plug doo-wop backing vocals and slight, twangy shards of electric guitar into a new version of one of their own old songs, making a huge hit in the process. That means that, unless Joe Biden secretly ghostwrote “Gangsta’s Paradise” or something, Charles G. Dawes is the only future vice president to get a writing credit on a #1 single.

The song is about how love can be difficult but how it all works out in the end: “Once in a while he will call, but it’s all in the game / Soon he’ll be there at your side with a sweet bouquet.” Edwards sounds distantly content, as though he’s watching all this drama from above and taking a quiet delight in it. You can hear him smiling. There’s no severity in the song, which means the stakes are low. But on a sheer surface level, it’s awfully pretty.

GRADE: 7/10
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-03 03:04:39 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
Tommy Edwards ­ ³It¹s All In The Game²
HIT #1: September 29, 1958
STAYED AT #1: 6 weeks
In 1911, a Chicago bank president named Charles G. Dawes wrote a piece of
instrumental music called ³Melody In A Major.² He showed his sheet music to a
friend, who then took it and got it published, and it became a popular piece
of sheet music. 14 years later, Dawes was elected vice president of the
United States of America under Calvin Coolidge. And in 1951, the same year
that Dawes died, a Brill Building songwriter named Carl Sigman used ³Melody
In A Major² as the basis for ³It¹s All In The Game,² a song about the fickle
and difficult nature of love. People like Louis Armstrong and Nat King Cole
recorded versions of the song, and so did a Virgina-born singer and
songwriter named Tommy Edwards.
Edwards took that 1951 version of ³It¹s All In The Game² into the top 20, but
he didn¹t hit #1 with it until seven years later, after other singers like
Elvis Presley had made hits with songs that Edwards had written. Carl
Sigman¹s son Michael wrote this article
(https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/field-notes-from-a-music_b_5722980.html)
about how his father, who hated rock Œn¹ roll, and the MGM Records A&R Harry
Meyerson, who hated it more, figured out a way to gently plug doo-wop backing
vocals and slight, twangy shards of electric guitar into a new version of one
of their own old songs, making a huge hit in the process. That means that,
unless Joe Biden secretly ghostwrote ³Gangsta¹s Paradise² or something,
Charles G. Dawes is the only future vice president to get a writing credit on
a #1 single.
The song is about how love can be difficult but how it all works out in the
end: ³Once in a while he will call, but it¹s all in the game / Soon he¹ll be
there at your side with a sweet bouquet.² Edwards sounds distantly content,
as though he¹s watching all this drama from above and taking a quiet delight
in it. You can hear him smiling. There¹s no severity in the song, which means
the stakes are low. But on a sheer surface level, it¹s awfully pretty.
GRADE: 7/10
I don't know how much more of the overly serious Breihan I can take,
but I'll play for a little while longer. He's right about how the
small changes from the original made the song sound fresh and amenable
to the r'n'r lovers of 1958. That is, I liked it when I heard it and
still place it among my favorite pop songs of the era. I wonder just
how much influence on Ray Charles its soulful vocal and r'n'r
borrowings added to what is still essentially a pop record may have
had. Ray in a far more sublime way perfected the trick when he went to
his new label.
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
SavoyBG
2018-11-03 03:18:01 UTC
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I did not know that Edwards had written hit songs. I looked them up, the big ones were "A Fool Such As I" and "Please Love Me Forever" and "This Chick's Too Young To Fry" for Louis Jordan.
Roger Ford
2018-11-03 07:22:31 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
I did not know that Edwards had written hit songs. I looked them up, the big ones were "A Fool Such As I" and "Please Love Me Forever" and "This Chick's Too Young To Fry" for Louis Jordan.
Huh?

Edwards certainly co-wrote "That Chick's Too Young To Fry" (with Jimmy
Hilliard) but Bill Trader wrote "(Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As
I" as originally recorded by Hank Snow and as later appeared in its
biggest selling version by Elvis.

"Please Love Me Forever" (the B side of Edwards' 1958 #1 version of
"It's All In The Game" and later in hit versions by Cathy Jean & The
Roommates and Bobby Vinton) was written by John Malone and Ollie
Blanchard.

Edwards did pen several of his own recordings including "All Over
Again" (the flip of the original "It's All In The Game"),"Mr Music
Man","Honestly And Truly" and others.

ROGER FORD
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"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
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SavoyBG
2018-11-03 13:08:47 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
I did not know that Edwards had written hit songs. I looked them up, the big ones were "A Fool Such As I" and "Please Love Me Forever" and "This Chick's Too Young To Fry" for Louis Jordan.
Huh?
Edwards certainly co-wrote "That Chick's Too Young To Fry" (with Jimmy
Hilliard) but Bill Trader wrote "(Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As
I" as originally recorded by Hank Snow and as later appeared in its
biggest selling version by Elvis.
"Please Love Me Forever" (the B side of Edwards' 1958 #1 version of
"It's All In The Game" and later in hit versions by Cathy Jean & The
Roommates and Bobby Vinton) was written by John Malone and Ollie
Blanchard.
Edwards did pen several of his own recordings including "All Over
Again" (the flip of the original "It's All In The Game"),"Mr Music
Man","Honestly And Truly" and others.
That's what I get for trusting Wikipedia I guess.
Bill B
2018-11-03 14:04:01 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 20:18:01 -0700 (PDT), SavoyBG <> > >I did not know that Edwards had written hit songs. I looked them up, the big ones were "A Fool Such As I" and "Please Love Me Forever" and "This Chick's Too Young To Fry" for Louis Jordan.
Huh?
Edwards certainly co-wrote "That Chick's Too Young To Fry" (with Jimmy
Hilliard) but Bill Trader wrote "(Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As
I" as originally recorded by Hank Snow and as later appeared in its
biggest selling version by Elvis.
"Please Love Me Forever" (the B side of Edwards' 1958 #1 version of
"It's All In The Game" and later in hit versions by Cathy Jean & The
Roommates and Bobby Vinton) was written by John Malone and Ollie
Blanchard.
Edwards did pen several of his own recordings including "All Over
Again" (the flip of the original "It's All In The Game"),"Mr Music
Man","Honestly And Truly" and others.
That's what I get for trusting Wikipedia I guess.
No, that's what you get for misreading Wikipedia. It says he wrote "That Chick's Too Young To Fry." and that is correct. But it doesn't say he wrote "A Fool Such As I" or "Please Love Me Forever." It says he recorded them and they became hits for other artists:

"Although Edwards recorded a number of other songs, none came close to achieving the same level of success, though several of his songs later became hits for other artists, such as "A Fool Such As I" by Elvis Presley, "It's All in the Game" by Cliff Richard and the Four Tops (Eddie Holman's version of it was the B-side of his hit "Hey There Lonely Girl"), "Please Love Me Forever" by Cathy Jean and the Roommates (1961) and by Bobby Vinton (1967), and "Morning Side of the Mountain" recorded by Donny and Marie Osmond."
SavoyBG
2018-11-03 16:32:56 UTC
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Post by Bill B
Post by SavoyBG
On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 20:18:01 -0700 (PDT), SavoyBG <> > >I did not know that Edwards had written hit songs. I looked them up, the big ones were "A Fool Such As I" and "Please Love Me Forever" and "This Chick's Too Young To Fry" for Louis Jordan.
Huh?
Edwards certainly co-wrote "That Chick's Too Young To Fry" (with Jimmy
Hilliard) but Bill Trader wrote "(Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As
I" as originally recorded by Hank Snow and as later appeared in its
biggest selling version by Elvis.
"Please Love Me Forever" (the B side of Edwards' 1958 #1 version of
"It's All In The Game" and later in hit versions by Cathy Jean & The
Roommates and Bobby Vinton) was written by John Malone and Ollie
Blanchard.
Edwards did pen several of his own recordings including "All Over
Again" (the flip of the original "It's All In The Game"),"Mr Music
Man","Honestly And Truly" and others.
That's what I get for trusting Wikipedia I guess.
"Although Edwards recorded a number of other songs, none came close to achieving the same level of success, though several of his songs later became hits for other artists, such as "A Fool Such As I" by Elvis Presley, "It's All in the Game" by Cliff Richard and the Four Tops (Eddie Holman's version of it was the B-side of his hit "Hey There Lonely Girl"), "Please Love Me Forever" by Cathy Jean and the Roommates (1961) and by Bobby Vinton (1967), and "Morning Side of the Mountain" recorded by Donny and Marie Osmond."
Okay, when I see "his songs" I assume that means he wrote them. The guy who wrote the review did the same thing I guess.
Jim Colegrove
2018-11-04 04:30:11 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Bill B
Post by SavoyBG
On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 20:18:01 -0700 (PDT), SavoyBG <> > >I did not know that Edwards had written hit songs. I looked them up, the big ones were "A Fool Such As I" and "Please Love Me Forever" and "This Chick's Too Young To Fry" for Louis Jordan.
Huh?
Edwards certainly co-wrote "That Chick's Too Young To Fry" (with Jimmy
Hilliard) but Bill Trader wrote "(Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As
I" as originally recorded by Hank Snow and as later appeared in its
biggest selling version by Elvis.
"Please Love Me Forever" (the B side of Edwards' 1958 #1 version of
"It's All In The Game" and later in hit versions by Cathy Jean & The
Roommates and Bobby Vinton) was written by John Malone and Ollie
Blanchard.
Edwards did pen several of his own recordings including "All Over
Again" (the flip of the original "It's All In The Game"),"Mr Music
Man","Honestly And Truly" and others.
That's what I get for trusting Wikipedia I guess.
"Although Edwards recorded a number of other songs, none came close to achieving the same level of success, though several of his songs later became hits for other artists, such as "A Fool Such As I" by Elvis Presley, "It's All in the Game" by Cliff Richard and the Four Tops (Eddie Holman's version of it was the B-side of his hit "Hey There Lonely Girl"), "Please Love Me Forever" by Cathy Jean and the Roommates (1961) and by Bobby Vinton (1967), and "Morning Side of the Mountain" recorded by Donny and Marie Osmond."
Okay, when I see "his songs" I assume that means he wrote them. The guy who wrote the review did the same thing I guess.
I agree. It should say "his records" or "songs he recorded" in place
of "his songs" to be clear.
Bill B
2018-11-04 12:50:25 UTC
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On Sat, 3 Nov 2018 09:32:56 -0700 (PDT), SavoyBG <m
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Bill B
Post by SavoyBG
On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 20:18:01 -0700 (PDT), SavoyBG <> > >I did not know that Edwards had written hit songs. I looked them up, the big ones were "A Fool Such As I" and "Please Love Me Forever" and "This Chick's Too Young To Fry" for Louis Jordan.
Huh?
Edwards certainly co-wrote "That Chick's Too Young To Fry" (with Jimmy
Hilliard) but Bill Trader wrote "(Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As
I" as originally recorded by Hank Snow and as later appeared in its
biggest selling version by Elvis.
"Please Love Me Forever" (the B side of Edwards' 1958 #1 version of
"It's All In The Game" and later in hit versions by Cathy Jean & The
Roommates and Bobby Vinton) was written by John Malone and Ollie
Blanchard.
Edwards did pen several of his own recordings including "All Over
Again" (the flip of the original "It's All In The Game"),"Mr Music
Man","Honestly And Truly" and others.
That's what I get for trusting Wikipedia I guess.
"Although Edwards recorded a number of other songs, none came close to achieving the same level of success, though several of his songs later became hits for other artists, such as "A Fool Such As I" by Elvis Presley, "It's All in the Game" by Cliff Richard and the Four Tops (Eddie Holman's version of it was the B-side of his hit "Hey There Lonely Girl"), "Please Love Me Forever" by Cathy Jean and the Roommates (1961) and by Bobby Vinton (1967), and "Morning Side of the Mountain" recorded by Donny and Marie Osmond."
Okay, when I see "his songs" I assume that means he wrote them. The guy who wrote the review did the same thing I guess.
I agree. It should say "his records" or "songs he recorded" in place
of "his songs" to be clear.
It does say "Edwards recorded a number of other songs" in the same sentence. I think the simplest way of removing any doubt would have been to remove "of his songs" all together, leaving "though several later became hits etc."
Roger Ford
2018-11-04 16:41:36 UTC
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As well as reviving his own "It's All In The Game" in a new 1958
version lets not forget that Edwards also successfully revisited other
earlier songs he'd recorded and shortly afterwards released new
updated versions of songs like "Please Mr Sun" and "Morningside Of The
Mountain" that became hits

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
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Roger Ford
2018-11-03 07:31:47 UTC
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For me Tommy Edwards' 1958 version of "It's All In The Game" is up
there as one of the best examples of the same artist or act
re-recording one of their own older recorded songs and coming up with
with a much better revised version a la "That'll Be The Day" and
"Sheila" to name two other examples

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
SavoyBG
2018-11-03 03:19:56 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.
In 1911, a Chicago bank president named Charles G. Dawes wrote a piece of instrumental music called “Melody In A Major.”
Found a version on youtube.
Jim Colegrove
2018-11-03 14:45:54 UTC
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On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 19:24:58 -0700 (PDT), Bob Roman
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.
Tommy Edwards – “It’s All In The Game”
HIT #1: September 29, 1958
STAYED AT #1: 6 weeks
In 1911, a Chicago bank president named Charles G. Dawes wrote a piece of instrumental music called “Melody In A Major.” He showed his sheet music to a friend, who then took it and got it published, and it became a popular piece of sheet music. 14 years later, Dawes was elected vice president of the United States of America under Calvin Coolidge. And in 1951, the same year that Dawes died, a Brill Building songwriter named Carl Sigman used “Melody In A Major” as the basis for “It’s All In The Game,” a song about the fickle and difficult nature of love. People like Louis Armstrong and Nat King Cole recorded versions of the song, and so did a Virgina-born singer and songwriter named Tommy Edwards.
Edwards took that 1951 version of “It’s All In The Game” into the top 20, but he didn’t hit #1 with it until seven years later, after other singers like Elvis Presley had made hits with songs that Edwards had written. Carl Sigman’s son Michael wrote this article (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/field-notes-from-a-music_b_5722980.html) about how his father, who hated rock ‘n’ roll, and the MGM Records A&R Harry Meyerson, who hated it more, figured out a way to gently plug doo-wop backing vocals and slight, twangy shards of electric guitar into a new version of one of their own old songs, making a huge hit in the process. That means that, unless Joe Biden secretly ghostwrote “Gangsta’s Paradise” or something, Charles G. Dawes is the only future vice president to get a writing credit on a #1 single.
The song is about how love can be difficult but how it all works out in the end: “Once in a while he will call, but it’s all in the game / Soon he’ll be there at your side with a sweet bouquet.” Edwards sounds distantly content, as though he’s watching all this drama from above and taking a quiet delight in it. You can hear him smiling. There’s no severity in the song, which means the stakes are low. But on a sheer surface level, it’s awfully pretty.
GRADE: 7/10
FWIW:

The actual lyric is "Once in a while he *won't* call, but it’s all in
the game..." A difference in attitude, ignoring and not being
thoughtful.
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