Discussion:
Racial Fluidity - Johnny Otis
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RWC
2019-04-09 04:20:48 UTC
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https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/racial-fluidity/index.html

"Most people who saw Otis perform during his heyday in the 1950s thought he was
a light-skinned black man. He used "we" when talking about black people, married
his black high school sweetheart and stayed in substandard "for colored only"
hotels with his black bandmates when they toured the South.
Johnny Otis, though, wasn't his real name. He was born Ioannis Alexandres
Veliotes to Greek immigrants in Northern California. He grew up in a black
neighborhood where he developed such a kinship with black culture that he walked
away from his whiteness and became black by choice."
...
Otis: "I do not expect everybody to understand it, but it is a fact. I am black
environmentally, psychologically, culturally, emotionally, and intellectually."

"Otis wouldn't be such a mystery today. He was a pioneer in what people now call
'racial fluidity.' It's the belief that race, like gender, is a choice, not a
biological identity you're assigned at birth. Racially fluid people reject the
box they're put in and craft their own identity."
Jim Colegrove
2019-04-09 13:53:10 UTC
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Post by RWC
https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/racial-fluidity/index.html
"Most people who saw Otis perform during his heyday in the 1950s thought he was
a light-skinned black man. He used "we" when talking about black people, married
his black high school sweetheart and stayed in substandard "for colored only"
hotels with his black bandmates when they toured the South.
Johnny Otis, though, wasn't his real name. He was born Ioannis Alexandres
Veliotes to Greek immigrants in Northern California. He grew up in a black
neighborhood where he developed such a kinship with black culture that he walked
away from his whiteness and became black by choice."
...
Otis: "I do not expect everybody to understand it, but it is a fact. I am black
environmentally, psychologically, culturally, emotionally, and intellectually."
"Otis wouldn't be such a mystery today. He was a pioneer in what people now call
'racial fluidity.' It's the belief that race, like gender, is a choice, not a
biological identity you're assigned at birth. Racially fluid people reject the
box they're put in and craft their own identity."
I performed on two shows with him and his orch. (both included Shuggie
and one with Bobby Day in his show). The frrst was Billy Bob's Texas
in Fort Worth and the second was the Belgian Rhythm and Blues Festival
in Lomel, 1989. I got to spend some time with him on the bus back to
our hotel. He was a great guy to hang with.
Dennis C
2019-04-09 14:33:39 UTC
Permalink
Hell yeah!!

I'm gonna fluidly apply for Native American status now!!

I scalped a ton of tickets to University of Tennessee football games back in the 70's and I was once removed from a high school baseball game with a wounded knee, baby!!
DianeE
2019-04-09 15:13:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by RWC
https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/racial-fluidity/index.html
"Most people who saw Otis perform during his heyday in the 1950s thought he was
a light-skinned black man. He used "we" when talking about black people, married
his black high school sweetheart and stayed in substandard "for colored only"
hotels with his black bandmates when they toured the South.
Johnny Otis, though, wasn't his real name. He was born Ioannis Alexandres
Veliotes to Greek immigrants in Northern California. He grew up in a black
neighborhood where he developed such a kinship with black culture that he walked
away from his whiteness and became black by choice."
...
Otis: "I do not expect everybody to understand it, but it is a fact. I am black
environmentally, psychologically, culturally, emotionally, and intellectually."
"Otis wouldn't be such a mystery today. He was a pioneer in what people now call
'racial fluidity.' It's the belief that race, like gender, is a choice, not a
biological identity you're assigned at birth. Racially fluid people reject the
box they're put in and craft their own identity."
-----------
About 10 years before Otis, the jazz musician Mezz Mezzrow (ne Milton
Mesirow) expressed similar sentiments. In fact, he claimed that once he
was arrested and put in a segregated jail and demanded to be housed with
the black prisoners.
You can't apply today's standards to things that happened in a different
era. I seem to say that a lot. It's one way of making sense of the
world, for me.
t***@iwvisp.com
2019-04-09 17:43:06 UTC
Permalink
Somebody should pay for a DNA test for Steve Cropper!

Ray
Dean F.
2019-04-10 04:20:03 UTC
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I'm overweight but identify as thin. Does that make me trans-slender?
Dennis C
2019-04-10 09:19:48 UTC
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That makes you nonorexic,baby!!
RWC
2019-04-11 05:21:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean F.
I'm overweight but identify as thin. Does that make me trans-slender?
Yes, Dean, with your new identity and status as a skinny person, you can no
longer be fat-shamed.

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