Discussion:
The Number Ones: The Marcels' "Blue Moon"
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Bob Roman
2018-12-16 17:36:56 UTC
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The Marcels – “Blue Moon”
HIT #1: April 3, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks

Fair warning here: I am about to spoil the ending of Jon Landis’ 1981 black-comic masterpiece An American Werewolf In London, a movie you should absolutely see. (Skip down a paragraph if you haven’t seen it.) In the final scene, David Kessler, the movie’s hero, has turned into a ferocious monster and gone on a killing spree. But Alex Price, Kessler’s girlfriend, tells Kessler that she loves him. He pauses for a second, then snarls, blood dripping from his jaws. The police surrounding Kessler open fire, and we see the human version of Kessler lying there, dead and naked, shot full of holes, as Price sobs. And then the Marcels’ “Blue Moon” plays, immediately turning everything that came before into a vast, dark joke. In the movie, the song functions like a fart noise. It’s great.

“Blue Moon” was not, on the face of it, a ridiculous song. It was decades old by the time the Marcels got to it. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart had written it for a never-released Hollywood musical in 1934. It had been a hit for Billy Eckstine in 1947, for Mel Tormé in 1949, and for Elvis Presley in 1956. (A couple of other versions of the song played earlier in An American Werewolf In London.) All those versions of the song were sad and tender and romantic. But for the Marcels, it was a dizzy cartoon burp. The Marcels’ version is an act of beautiful vandalism.

The Marcels, a mixed-race doo-wop quintet from Pittsburgh, had never recorded anything before “Blue Moon,” and they’d never go on to have another real hit. But their “Blue Moon” is two minutes of daffy pop magic. Bass singer Fred Johnson had started it off with a madcap stuttering riff, and then the rest of the group had sung the song by emitting goofy noises over one another, all of it somehow coming together into beautifully choreographed chaos.

None of the Marcels gives any consideration to the song’s emotional focus. Nobody cares. They just mine the song for hooks. They treat it like a bouncy castle, and all of them take turns doing backflips. It’s a truly ridiculous interpretation, and that’s what makes it great.

GRADE: 8/10
SavoyBG
2018-12-16 18:09:09 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
The Marcels – “Blue Moon”
HIT #1: April 3, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks
The Marcels, a mixed-race doo-wop quintet from Pittsburgh, had never recorded anything before “Blue Moon,” and they’d never go on to have another real hit.
What a jerkoff this clod is.
Roger Ford
2018-12-16 19:14:35 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Dec 2018 09:36:56 -0800 (PST), Bob Roman
The Marcels – “Blue Moon”
HIT #1: April 3, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks
Fair warning here: I am about to spoil the ending of Jon Landis’ 1981 black-comic masterpiece
An American Werewolf In London, a movie you should absolutely see. (Skip down a paragraph
if you haven’t seen it.) In the final scene, David Kessler, the movie’s hero, has turned into a ferocious
monster and gone on a killing spree. But Alex Price, Kessler’s girlfriend, tells Kessler that she loves
him. He pauses for a second, then snarls, blood dripping from his jaws. The police surrounding Kessler
open fire, and we see the human version of Kessler lying there, dead and naked, shot full of holes, as
Price sobs. And then the Marcels’ “Blue Moon” plays, immediately turning everything that came before
into a vast, dark joke. In the movie, the song functions like a fart noise. It’s great.
That's a totally ficticious part of London that is depicted in the
final werewolf death scene in the movie.None of the streets around
that (itself fictitious) Piccadilly movie theatre lead to anywhere
remotely like the place as shown. But that's a minor quibble---"An
American Werewolf In London" is a GREAT movie with the added bonus of
a pretty hot Jenny Agutter nude scene
“Blue Moon” was not, on the face of it, a ridiculous song. It was decades old by the time the Marcels
got to it. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart had written it for a never-released Hollywood musical in
1934.
No,it was was first written by Lorenz Hart as "Prayer (Oh, Lord Make
Me A Movie Star)" and was intended for Jean Harlow to warble in
"Hollywood Party". The movie WAS released (Jimmy Durante is in it and
Ollie & Stan among others)----but minus both Harlow herself and the
song in question.

When the inclusion in "Hollywood Party" fell thru,Lorenz Hart wrote
new lyrics to the song (retitled "It's Just That Kind Of Play") to be
used as the theme song for MGM's "Manhattan Melodrama" (1934)

But shortly before completition the theme song itself was abandoned.
But when a song was required at short notice for the Cotton Club
sequence in the movie Hart wrote a THIRD set of lyrics and presented
the now retitled "The Bad In Every Man" to cabaret singer Shirley Ross
(who'd incidentally also performed--- uncredited in the already
mentioned "Hollywood Party")

"Manhattan Melodrama" was also notable a) for being the movie that
John Dillinger had just been watching when he was shot dead by Federal

agents outside a Chicago movie house later in 1934 and b) for the
successful teaming of William Powell and Myrna Loy leading to MGM
deciding to cast the duo in "The Thin Man" smash hit later that same
year.

The song was finally revamped later in the year as the familiar "Blue
Moon" we all know and love and which made its recorded debut in an
original version by Glen Gray & His Casa Loma Orchestra waxed in
November 1934.
It had been a hit for Billy Eckstine in 1947, for Mel Tormé in 1949, and for Elvis Presley in 1956
No,the Billy Eckstine hit version was in 1949 too since the song
became hugely popular early that year after it's inclusion in the
(highly fictitious) Rodgers & Hart bio movie "Words And Music" where
it was sung by Mel Torme who had the other big 1949 hit with the song
. (A couple of other versions of the song played earlier in An American Werewolf In London.) All those
versions of the song were sad and tender and romantic. But for the Marcels, it was a dizzy cartoon burp
The Marcels’ version is an act of beautiful vandalism.
Bobby Vinton's "Blue Moon" plays over the opening credits,Sam Cooke's
version plays during one of the terrific "transformation" sequences
and The Marcels close the movie with the song. There were a couple of
other "moon" related songs in the movie too---CCR's "Bad Moon Rising"
and Van Morrison's "Moondance"--all used to equally wonderful effect
The Marcels, a mixed-race doo-wop quintet from Pittsburgh, had never recorded anything before “Blue
Moon,” and they’d never go on to have another real hit.
Nonsense! "Summertime" was a #7 hit for them later in 1961. They also
hit the Hot Hundred with "Summertime" and "My Melancholy Baby!
But their “Blue Moon” is two minutes of daffy pop magic. Bass singer Fred Johnson had started it off
with a madcap stuttering riff, and then the rest of the group had sung the song by emitting goofy
noises over one another, all of it somehow coming together into beautifully choreographed chaos.
None of the Marcels gives any consideration to the song’s emotional focus. Nobody cares. They just
mine the song for hooks. They treat it like a bouncy castle, and all of them take turns doing backflips
It’s a truly ridiculous interpretation, and that’s what makes it great.
GRADE: 8/10
I give it 9.

My favorite versions of "Blue Moon"

1. THE MARCELS (1961)
2. ELVIS PRESLEY (1956)
3. DON JULIAN & THE MEADOWLARKS (1957)
4. THE CHORDS (SH-BOOMS) (1961)
5. THE DIABLOS (1962)

Here's how the Marcels fared in the 1961 Singles Battle

R1
28 The Marcels - Blue Moon - Colpix 186
4 Carl McVoy - Rainin' In My Heart - Tri 212
R2
25 The Marcels - Blue Moon - Colpix 186
2 Chris Kenner - Right Kind Of Girl - Prigan 2002
R3
4 Etta James - Fool That I Am - Argo 5390
25 The Marcels - Blue Moon - Colpix 186
R4
19 The Marcels - Blue Moon - Colpix 186
13 Dee Clark - Raindrops - Vee Jay 383
R5
11 Ray Charles - Unchain My Heart - ABC-Paramount 10266
19 The Marcels - Blue Moon - Colpix 186
R6
18 The Marcels - Blue Moon - Colpix 186
14 The Showmen - It Will Stand - Minit 632
QUARTER
17 Bobby Bland - Turn On Your Love Light - Duke 344
14 The Marcels - Blue Moon - Colpix 186
BTW I don't know what you did different with this post Bob but at last
it arrives on my browser with a readable header :)


ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
Bob Roman
2018-12-16 21:12:11 UTC
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...with the added bonus of
a pretty hot Jenny Agutter nude scene
...Van Morrison's "Moondance"--all used to equally wonderful effect
You repeat yourself :)
BTW I don't know what you did different with this post Bob but at last
it arrives on my browser with a readable header :)
Interesting. I typed the header this time, whereas previously I cut-and-pasted it. Thanks for the feedback.

--
BR
SavoyBG
2018-12-16 21:41:04 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
On Sun, 16 Dec 2018 09:36:56 -0800 (PST), Bob Roman
Post by Bob Roman
The Marcels – “Blue Moon”
HIT #1: April 3, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks
The Marcels, a mixed-race doo-wop quintet from Pittsburgh, had never recorded anything before “Blue
Moon,” and they’d never go on to have another real hit.
Nonsense! "Summertime" was a #7 hit for them later in 1961.
I think you mean "Heartaches" old timer!
Roger Ford
2018-12-17 04:12:08 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
On Sun, 16 Dec 2018 09:36:56 -0800 (PST), Bob Roman
The Marcels =E2=80=93 =E2=80=9CBlue Moon=E2=80=9D
HIT #1: April 3, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks
The Marcels, a mixed-race doo-wop quintet from Pittsburgh, had never rec=
orded anything before =E2=80=9CBlue
Post by Roger Ford
Moon,=E2=80=9D and they=E2=80=99d never go on to have another real hit.=
Nonsense! "Summertime" was a #7 hit for them later in 1961.
I think you mean "Heartaches" old timer!
Yes of course. I'm all mixed up :)




ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
Dean F.
2018-12-17 04:18:13 UTC
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I ranked "Blue Moon" as my 3rd-favorite recording of 1961. To me, it's a clear 10/10.
SavoyBG
2018-12-17 05:07:51 UTC
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Post by Dean F.
I ranked "Blue Moon" as my 3rd-favorite recording of 1961. To me, it's a clear 10/10.
Just a solid 8 for me. # 45.

1 ¦ It Will Stand ¦ Showmen
2 ¦ No Sweet Lovin' ¦ Drifters
3 ¦ Let The Four Winds Blow ¦ Fats Domino
4 ¦ Footstompin' ¦ Flares
5 ¦ Lonely No More ¦ Little Milton
6 ¦ Pony Time ¦ Chubby Checker
7 ¦ I Pity The Fool ¦ Bobby "Blue" Bland
8 ¦ Hung Down Head ¦ Lowell Fulsom
9 ¦ Running Scared ¦ Roy Orbison
10 ¦ Smoky Places ¦ Corsairs
11 ¦ I Hear You Knocking ¦ Fats Domino
12 ¦ Don't Knock ¦ Spiders (LP cut)
13 ¦ Honey, I Ain't Teasin' ¦ Smokey Smothers
14 ¦ Takin' Care Of Business ¦ Freddy King
15 ¦ Dear Lady (Twist) ¦ Gary U.S. Bonds
16 ¦ She Got Low Down ¦ Huey "Piano" Smith
17 ¦ Honey Bee ¦ Drifters
18 ¦ Poor Fool ¦ Ike & Tina Turner
19 ¦ The Red Rooster ¦ Howlin' Wolf
20 ¦ Duke Of Earl ¦ Gene Chandler
21 ¦ Walking Around In Circles ¦ Spiders (LP cut)
22 ¦ Turn On Your Lovelight ¦ Bobby "Blue" Bland
23 ¦ Night Train ¦ James Brown
24 ¦ See See Baby ¦ Freddy King
25 ¦ I'm Glad She's Mine ¦ Lonesome Sundown
26 ¦ Don't Start Cryin' Now ¦ Slim Harpo
27 ¦ Quarter To Three ¦ Gary US Bonds
28 ¦ So Mean To Me ¦ Little Milton
29 ¦ Soothe Me ¦ Sims Twins
30 ¦ Last Night ¦ Mar-Keys
31 ¦ Hit The Road Jack ¦ Ray Charles
32 ¦ Crying ¦ Roy Orbison
33 ¦ Te-Ta-Te-Ta-Ta ¦ Ernie K-Doe
34 ¦ Sweet Jelly Roll ¦ Jessie Hill
35 ¦ Jambalaya ¦ Fats Domino
36 ¦ Hop, Skip and Jump ¦ Roy Milton
37 ¦ I Really Love You ¦ Stereos
38 ¦ His Latest Flame ¦ Elvis Presley
39 ¦ Walk Right Back ¦ Everly Brothers
40 ¦ Ya-Ya ¦ Lee Dorsey
41 ¦ Come Over Here ¦ James Brown
42 ¦ School Is Out ¦ Gary U.S. Bonds
43 ¦ Just Got To Know ¦ Jimmy McCracklin
44 ¦ I've Been Your Fool ¦ Duke Stevens
45 ¦ Blue Moon ¦ Marcels
46 ¦ My True Story ¦ Jive Five
47 ¦ I'm Tore Down ¦ Freddy King
48 ¦ Mother-In-Law ¦ Ernie K-Doe
49 ¦ Drive It Home ¦ Clovers
50 ¦ Long Tall Girl ¦ Carnations
51 ¦ A Certain Girl ¦ Ernie K-Doe
52 ¦ Hey Baby ¦ Bruce Channel
53 ¦ I Like It Like That ¦ Chris Kenner
54 ¦ St. James Infirmary ¦ Bobby "Blue" Bland
55 ¦ Bright Lights, Big City ¦ Jimmy Reed
56 ¦ Sweets For My Sweet ¦ Drifters
57 ¦ I Walked All Night Long ¦ Albert King
58 ¦ Little Egypt ¦ Coasters
59 ¦ The Wanderer ¦ Dion
60 ¦ Gypsy Woman ¦ Impressions
61 ¦ Pretty Little Angel Eyes ¦ Curtis Lee
62 ¦ Go-Go-Go ¦ Chuck Berry
63 ¦ Lonesome Whistle Blues ¦ Freddy King
64 ¦ Hideaway ¦ Freddy King
65 ¦ Please Stay ¦ Drifters
66 ¦ Runaway ¦ Del Shannon
67 ¦ Mojo Hand ¦ Lightning Hopkins
68 ¦ Driving Wheel ¦ Little Junior Parker
69 ¦ You Don't Miss Your Water ¦ William Bell
70 ¦ Stop Right Now ¦ Sonny Boy Williamson
71 ¦ Ain't That Loving You ¦ Bobby "Blue" Bland
72 ¦ What Is This I See ¦ Hank Ballard & Midnighters
73 ¦ Bristol Stomp ¦ Dovells
74 ¦ Wait A Minute ¦ Coasters
75 ¦ Dum Dum ¦ Brenda Lee
76 ¦ Peppermint Twist ¦ Joey Dee & Starlighters
77 ¦ We Got A Party ¦ Party Boys
78 ¦ Lover's Island ¦ Blue Jays
79 ¦ Daddy's Home ¦ Shep & Limelites
80 ¦ In My Heart ¦ Timetones
81 ¦ Travelin' Man ¦ Ricky Nelson
82 ¦ You Better Move On ¦ Arthur Alexander
83 ¦ My Song ¦ Little Milton
84 ¦ Kansas City ¦ Brenda Lee
85 ¦ That's What Girls Are Made For ¦ Spinners
86 ¦ Lay It On The Line ¦ Dominoes
87 ¦ But On The Other Hand Baby ¦ Ray Charles
88 ¦ Hey Girl ¦ Lucky Carmichael
89 ¦ The Only One I Love ¦ Miracles
90 ¦ I've Made Nights By Myself ¦ Albert King
91 ¦ Fine Little Mama ¦ Elmore James
92 ¦ I Don't Want To Cry ¦ Chuck Jackson
93 ¦ Ain't Gonna Do It ¦ Fats Domino
94 ¦ The Honeydripper ¦ Clovers
95 ¦ Not Going To Cry ¦ Five Royales
96 ¦ I Know ¦ Barbara George
97 ¦ The Mill Ain't Far ¦ Huey "Piano" Smith & Clowns
98 ¦ There's No Other ¦ Crystals
99 ¦ Now That I Have You ¦ Willows
100 ¦ A Little Bit Of Soap ¦ Jarmels

BUBBLING UNDER FROM 1961:
101 ¦ Coal Miner ¦ Nappy Brown
102 ¦ What A Price ¦ Fats Domino
103 ¦ Jelly, Jelly, Jelly ¦ Bobby "Blue" Bland
104 ¦ I'm A Fool To Care ¦ Joe Barry
105 ¦ Hello Mary Lou ¦ Ricky Nelson
106 ¦ Solitaire ¦ Embers
107 ¦ Break It To Me Gently ¦ Brenda Lee
108 ¦ Mean Little Mama ¦ Roy Orbison
109 ¦ Runaround Sue ¦ Dion
110 ¦ Buzz Buzz A-Diddle-It ¦ Freddy Cannon
111 ¦ I'm Blue (The Gong-Gong Song) ¦ Ikettes
112 ¦ The Fishin' Hole ¦ Andy Griffith
113 ¦ Standing On The Corner ¦ Smiley Lewis
114 ¦ Looking For A Man ¦ Mable John
115 ¦ The Things I'd Do For You ¦ Junior Wells
116 ¦ Midnight Ramblin' Tonight ¦ H-Bomb Ferguson
117 ¦ I Hear Jingle Bells ¦ Freddy King
118 ¦ You Don't Have To Go ¦ James Brown
119 ¦ Hey Girl ¦ Smiley Lewis
120 ¦ Get Out Of Here ¦ B.B. King
121 ¦ When We Get Married ¦ Dreamlovers
122 ¦ Double Eye Whammy ¦ Tommy Ridgley
123 ¦ Wanted $10,000 Reward ¦ Ernie K-Doe
124 ¦ Where Have All The Flowers Gone ¦ Kingston Trio
125 ¦ I Play For Keeps ¦ Little Mac (Georgia Hinton)
126 ¦ Let's Twist Again ¦ Chubby Checker
127 ¦ I'm Young ¦ Hank Ballard & Midnighters
128 ¦ I Don't Mind ¦ James Brown
129 ¦ Moon River ¦ Jerry Butler
130 ¦ Unchain My Heart ¦ Ray Charles
131 ¦ If You Want To ¦ Carousels
132 ¦ Loving A Girl Like You ¦ Harptones
133 ¦ Go Back Where You Came From ¦ Summits
134 ¦ Locked Up ¦ Sonny Fulton
135 ¦ Nag ¦ Halos
136 ¦ Just One More Time ¦ Concertones
137 ¦ No More Pain ¦ Sam & Dave
138 ¦ Rainin' In My Heart ¦ Slim Harpo
139 ¦ I Got Mine ¦ Jessie Hill
140 ¦ You Got Me Up Tight ¦ Gay Poppers
141 ¦ Back To School ¦ Professor Hamilton & Schoolboys
142 ¦ Too Close Together ¦ Sonny Boy Williamson
143 ¦ You Don't Love Me ¦ Willie Cobb
144 ¦ Nothing But The Blues ¦ Smiley Lewis
145 ¦ Norman ¦ Sue Thompson
146 ¦ Runaround ¦ Regents
147 ¦ Tossin' And Turnin' ¦ Bobby Lewis
148 ¦ Barbara Ann ¦ Regents
149 ¦ Little Sister ¦ Elvis Presley
150 ¦ Moody River ¦ Pat Boone
151 ¦ All My Love Belongs To You ¦ Vibrations
152 ¦ Some Kind Of Wonderful ¦ Drifters
153 ¦ Surfin' ¦ Beach Boys
154 ¦ That's How You Know When You're Growing Old ¦ Dominoes
155 ¦ I'm A Little Mixed Up ¦ Betty James
156 ¦ Harchy Carchy ¦ Gene & Ruth
157 ¦ I Am Bound ¦ Golden Harmoneers
158 ¦ Cupid ¦ Sam Cooke
159 ¦ Find Another Girl ¦ Jerry Butler
160 ¦ Rock And Roll Uprising ¦ Adventurers
161 ¦ The Boogie Twist ¦ Cal Valentine & Texas Rockers
162 ¦ Alimony ¦ Huey "Piano" Smith & Clowns
163 ¦ Lost Someone ¦ James Brown
164 ¦ My Last Dance With You ¦ Nathaniel Mayer & Fabulous Twilights
165 ¦ How Deep Is The Ocean ¦ Bobby Jacobs & Rhythm Rascals
166 ¦ I'm Jealous ¦ Ike & Tina Turner
167 ¦ The Boll Weevil Song ¦ Brook Benton
168 ¦ Off To Work Again ¦ Wilbert Harrison
169 ¦ Mr. Charles Blues ¦ Ray Charles
170 ¦ Good Hearted Man ¦ Fats Domino
171 ¦ Walking Down The Street ¦ Huey "Piano" Smith & Clowns
172 ¦ Heartaches ¦ Marcels
173 ¦ Got Me A Louisiana Woman ¦ Lightnin' Hopkins
174 ¦ Rock Out Of This World ¦ Joe Norris
175 ¦ Crying In The Rain ¦ Everly Brothers
176 ¦ Nervous Breakdown ¦ Eddie Cochran
177 ¦ Something You Got ¦ Chris Kenner
178 ¦ Juanita Of Mexico ¦ Professor Hamilton & Schoolboys
179 ¦ Why Don't You Write Me ¦ Cardinals
180 ¦ Welcome Home ¦ Dreamlovers
181 ¦ Don't Tell Nobody ¦ Dells
182 ¦ You Know That You Love Me ¦ Freddy King
183 ¦ Daddy Must Be A Man ¦ Unforgettables
184 ¦ Peanut Butter ¦ Marathons
185 ¦ Please Mr. Postman ¦ Marvelettes
186 ¦ It's Gonna Work Out Fine ¦ Ike & Tina Turner
187 ¦ Come On ¦ Chuck Berry
188 ¦ Down In The Bottom ¦ Howlin' Wolf
189 ¦ I Don't Play ¦ Little Walter
190 ¦ I Feel So Bad ¦ Elvis Presley
191 ¦ You Don't Know What You've Got ¦ Ral Donner
192 ¦ I'm Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town ¦ Ray Charles
193 ¦ Cuttin' In ¦ Johnny "Guitar" Watson
194 ¦ Let It Be ¦ Bette Watts
195 ¦ What Did She Use ¦ Spinners
196 ¦ Here Comes Suzy ¦ Classmates
197 ¦ Heart And Soul ¦ Cleftones
198 ¦ Do Re Mi ¦ Lee Dorsey
199 ¦ Baby It's You ¦ Shirelles
200 ¦ September In The Rain ¦ Dinah Washington
201 ¦ I'm Talking About You ¦ Chuck Berry
202 ¦ Louie Louie ¦ Rockin Robin Roberts
203 ¦ Your Ma Said You Cried In Your Sleep Last Night ¦ Kenny Dino
204 ¦ Ain't That Just Like A Woman ¦ Fats Domino
205 ¦ Tell The Truth Baby ¦ Blues Slim
206 ¦ The Girl's A Devil ¦ Dukays
207 ¦ Packin' Up ¦ Chris Kenner
208 ¦ A Little Bitty Tear ¦ Burl Ives
209 ¦ Must Be Santa ¦ Mitch Miller
210 ¦ Young Boy Blues ¦ Ben E. King
211 ¦ Come Home Soon ¦ Intruders
212 ¦ Louisiana Mama ¦ Gene Pitney
213 ¦ I've Got To Find My Baby ¦ Syl Johnson
214 ¦ I Just Don't Know ¦ Ligghtnin' Slim
215 ¦ One Mint Julep ¦ Ray Charles
216 ¦ Man We Had A Party ¦ Wanda Jackson
217 ¦ Hoonie Boonie ¦ Nappy Brown
218 ¦ Juke Box Saturday Night ¦ Nino & Ebb Tides
219 ¦ Tonight I Fell In Love ¦ Tokens
220 ¦ Fat-Fat-Mom-Mi-O ¦ Chalets
221 ¦ This Kind of Love ¦ Roy Orbison
222 ¦ Be-bop Baby ¦ Confessions
223 ¦ Green Sally, Up ¦ Jessie Pratcher, Mattie Gardner & Mary Gardner
224 ¦ Want Ad Blues ¦ John Lee Hooker
225 ¦ Susie And Pat ¦ Jimmy McCracklin
226 ¦ Hillbilly Music (Country Music Is Here To Stay) ¦ Jerry Lee Lewis
Dennis C
2018-12-17 13:07:15 UTC
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You got Del Shannon and Dion's megahits ranked way down there!

Overplay?
SavoyBG
2018-12-17 13:31:32 UTC
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Post by Dennis C
You got Del Shannon and Dion's megahits ranked way down there!
Overplay?
Only pedestrians would rank those real highly.
Dennis C
2018-12-17 14:39:35 UTC
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Your the pedestrian. You don't like songs with "run" in 'em, baby!!
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