Discussion:
The Number Ones: The Everly Brothers’ “Cathy’s Clown”
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Bob Roman
2018-11-27 21:32:48 UTC
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A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.

The Everly Brothers – “Cathy’s Clown”
HIT #1: May 23, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 5 weeks

Of that initial big-bang wave of ’50s rock ‘n’ roll stars, the Everly Brothers were arguably the least threatening. On songs like “All I Have To Do Is Dream,” a #1 in the pre-Hot 100 era of 1958, they radiated a tremulous lost-little-kid vulnerability. That approachability might have been one key to their longevity; they were still making hits back when many of their peers were falling off. Another key was their craftsmanship; the Everly Brothers simply knew how to put a song together.

“Cathy’s Clown” was the best-selling single of the duo’s career, but it wasn’t their greatest. It’s a perfectly solid pop song about romantic bitterness, but it doesn’t have the floaty, otherworldly quality that set their real classics apart. The Everlys, at their best, sounded completely bewildered by the world around them. The “Cathy’s Clown” hook — “don’t want your looooove anymore” — doesn’t have that. It sounds shrill and mean. But it still works.

Part of it is the strange, gallumphing arrangement; producer Wesley Rose used tape-looping to make it sound like there were two drummers playing on the song. Part of it is the way the Everly’s interweave their voices, one putting in tiny embellishments while the other sings the line straight-up. And part of it, maybe, is the way they managed to make even that bitterness sound friendly and approachable.

GRADE: 7/10
Roger Ford
2018-11-27 22:06:07 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 13:32:48 -0800 (PST), Bob Roman
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.
The Everly Brothers – “Cathy’s Clown”
HIT #1: May 23, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 5 weeks
Of that initial big-bang wave of ’50s rock ‘n’ roll stars, the Everly Brothers
were arguably the least threatening. On songs like “All I Have To Do Is Dream,”
a #1 in the pre-Hot 100 era of 1958, they radiated a tremulous lost-little-kid
vulnerability. That approachability might have been one key to their longevity;
they were still making hits back when many of their peers were falling off.
Another key was their craftsmanship; the Everly Brothers simply knew how to
put a song together.
“Cathy’s Clown” was the best-selling single of the duo’s career, but it wasn’t their
greatest. It’s a perfectly solid pop song about romantic bitterness, but it doesn’t
have the floaty, otherworldly quality that set their real classics apart. The Everlys,
at their best, sounded completely bewildered by the world around them. The
“Cathy’s Clown” hook — “don’t want your looooove anymore” — doesn’t have that.
It sounds shrill and mean. But it still works.
Part of it is the strange, gallumphing arrangement; producer Wesley Rose used
tape-looping to make it sound like there were two drummers playing on the song.
Part of it is the way the Everly’s interweave their voices, one putting in tiny
embellishments while the other sings the line straight-up. And part of it, maybe, is
the way they managed to make even that bitterness sound friendly and approachable.
GRADE: 7/10
The highly publicized move by the brothers to Warner Bros actually
started off really well. It's worth remembering that the contract they
signed with WB in 1960 was the very first $1 million deal offered to
any recording act.This was partly due to the troubled label being
desperate to sign a really high profile "big name" act.

Warner Bros Records had launched in 1958 and the first two years
trading figures were disastrous despite the odd hit single ("Kookie,
Kookie") here and there. Signing the Everlys with their huge
popularity and proven hit track record would put Warner Bros on the
map big time and catapult it overnight to being a near-major label.

And it did indeed work out that way. For example,in England Warners
had no dstributor before 1960 and no local company here wanted to work
with them. But on signing the Everly Brothers WB was immidiately able
to command a very lucrative distribution deal signed with UK Decca who
launched the UK Warner Bros label in March 1960 with enormous fanfare
with the issue of single # WB 1---a little ditty by the boys called
"Cathy's Clown".

"Cathy's Clown" was one of the best---and certainly one of the
strongest---singles the brothers ever had reaching #1 on both sides of
the Atlantic and becoming the biggest of the big (in both chart terms
and sales) of all the Everly Brothers hits.

It's my second favorite Everlys single (after "Bye Bye Love") and I
give it an 8

Here's how it did in the 1960 Singles Battle

R1
Post by Bob Roman
1 B.B King - Partin' Time - Kent 346
28 The Everly Brothers - Cathy's Clown - Warner Bros 5151
R2
Post by Bob Roman
25 The Everly Brothers - Cathy's Clown - Warner Bros 5151
8 The Flamingos - Your Other Love - End 1081
R3
Post by Bob Roman
29 The Everly Brothers - Cathy's Clown - Warner Bros 5151
5 Ray Charles - Them That Got - ABC-Paramount 10141
R4
Post by Bob Roman
14 The Olympics - Big Boy Pete - Arvee 595
23 The Everly Brothers - Cathy's Clown - Warner Bros 5151
R5
Post by Bob Roman
22 The Everly Brothers - Cathy's Clown - Warner Bros 5151
12 Brook Benton & Dinah Washington - Baby You Got What It Takes - Mercury 71565
R6
Post by Bob Roman
27 Ben E. King - Spanish Harlem - Atco 6185
7 The Everly Brothers - Cathy's Clown - Warner Bros 5151
ROGER FORD
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SavoyBG
2018-11-27 22:16:28 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
The highly publicized move by the brothers to Warner Bros actually
started off really well. It's worth remembering that the contract they
signed with WB in 1960 was the very first $1 million deal offered to
any recording act.
Did Ray not get that much from ABC? I know he got other things, like artistic control and owning his own masters.

Sinatra did not get as much from Capitol at some point?
Roger Ford
2018-11-28 05:35:34 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
The highly publicized move by the brothers to Warner Bros actually
started off really well. It's worth remembering that the contract they
signed with WB in 1960 was the very first $1 million deal offered to
any recording act.
Did Ray not get that much from ABC? I know he got other things, like artistic control and owning his own masters.
Sinatra did not get as much from Capitol at some point?
I don't think those moves were publicized, at least not the finances
of them

The Everlys biography states that Wesley Rose handled the contract
deal and got a guaranteed offer of $100,000 a year for ten years from
WB with provision for movie tests with the film division for the two
boys (wonder how that went? :) and artistic approval of all their
releases (including album and promotional artwork)

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!

Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-27 22:44:44 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 13:32:48 -0800 (PST), Bob Roman
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit
#1 in the Billboard Hot 100.
The Everly Brothers – “Cathy’s Clown”
HIT #1: May 23, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 5 weeks
Of that initial big-bang wave of ’50s rock ‘n’ roll stars, the Everly Brothers
were arguably the least threatening.
WTF. I guess he must mean they were white. Everyone knew Fats Domino
was just a big cuddly teddy bear.
Post by Roger Ford
Post by Bob Roman
On songs like “All I Have To Do Is
Dream,”
a #1 in the pre-Hot 100 era of 1958, they radiated a tremulous lost-little-kid
vulnerability. That approachability might have been one key to their longevity;
they were still making hits back when many of their peers were falling off.
Another key was their craftsmanship; the Everly Brothers simply knew how to
put a song together.
“Cathy’s Clown” was the best-selling single of the duo’s career, but it wasn’t their
greatest. It’s a perfectly solid pop song about romantic bitterness, but it doesn’t
have the floaty, otherworldly quality that set their real classics apart. The Everlys,
at their best, sounded completely bewildered by the world around them. The
“Cathy’s Clown” hook — “don’t want your looooove anymore” — doesn’t have that.
It sounds shrill and mean. But it still works.
Part of it is the strange, gallumphing arrangement; producer Wesley Rose used
tape-looping to make it sound like there were two drummers playing on the song.
Part of it is the way the Everly’s interweave their voices, one putting in tiny
embellishments while the other sings the line straight-up. And part of it, maybe, is
the way they managed to make even that bitterness sound friendly and approachable.
GRADE: 7/10
The highly publicized move by the brothers to Warner Bros actually
started off really well. It's worth remembering that the contract they
signed with WB in 1960 was the very first $1 million deal offered to
any recording act.This was partly due to the troubled label being
desperate to sign a really high profile "big name" act.
Warner Bros Records had launched in 1958 and the first two years
trading figures were disastrous despite the odd hit single ("Kookie,
Kookie") here and there. Signing the Everlys with their huge
popularity and proven hit track record would put Warner Bros on the
map big time and catapult it overnight to being a near-major label.
And by the start of the 70s they were huge, as demonstrated by their
famous "two-fer" record samplers which, for better or worse, included
many of the acts that were to dominate the 70s. I have practically the
whole run of them, and much of it sounds awfully dated nowadays, as
does so much of that era's music. (While 50s music, of course, doesn't
sound at all dated. :))
Post by Roger Ford
And it did indeed work out that way. For example,in England Warners
had no dstributor before 1960 and no local company here wanted to work
with them. But on signing the Everly Brothers WB was immidiately able
to command a very lucrative distribution deal signed with UK Decca who
launched the UK Warner Bros label in March 1960 with enormous fanfare
with the issue of single # WB 1---a little ditty by the boys called
"Cathy's Clown".
"Cathy's Clown" was one of the best---and certainly one of the
strongest---singles the brothers ever had reaching #1 on both sides of
the Atlantic and becoming the biggest of the big (in both chart terms
and sales) of all the Everly Brothers hits.
It's my second favorite Everlys single (after "Bye Bye Love") and I
give it an 8
I put it third, after BBL and "I Wonder If I Care As Much," which for
some reason has always grabbed me. I think it's the way they sing
"care" as "keer."
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Dennis C
2018-11-27 22:57:52 UTC
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" aahon'tkeer!" Consolidant Appalachian phrase meaning "I don't care". Say it fast and altogether, baby!!
SavoyBG
2018-11-27 23:06:39 UTC
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Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Roger Ford
It's my second favorite Everlys single (after "Bye Bye Love") and I
give it an 8
I put it third, after BBL and "I Wonder If I Care As Much," which for
some reason has always grabbed me. I think it's the way they sing
"care" as "keer."
It's lower for me, but I also have "I Wonder" ahead of it.

1. Bye Bye Love
2. Wake Up Little Susie
3. Should We Tell Him
4. ('Til) I Kissed You
5. Bird Dog
6. Walk Right Back
7. When Will I Be Loved
8. I Wonder if I Care as Much
9. Cathy's Clown
10. This Little Girl Of Mine
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-28 01:15:48 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Roger Ford
It's my second favorite Everlys single (after "Bye Bye Love") and I
give it an 8
I put it third, after BBL and "I Wonder If I Care As Much," which for
some reason has always grabbed me. I think it's the way they sing
"care" as "keer."
It's lower for me, but I also have "I Wonder" ahead of it.
1. Bye Bye Love
2. Wake Up Little Susie
3. Should We Tell Him
4. ('Til) I Kissed You
5. Bird Dog
6. Walk Right Back
7. When Will I Be Loved
8. I Wonder if I Care as Much
9. Cathy's Clown
10. This Little Girl Of Mine
Never liked "Bird Dog," which seemed a waste of their talent. "('Til)
I Kissed You" would probably be my #4.
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