Discussion:
Myy 100 Favorite Record Acts of the 1950s
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-09-30 19:34:20 UTC
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Just finished putting together my 100 favorite recording acts of the 1950s. The list is based only on records either released during the 1950-1959 period, or recorded during that period and not issued until many years later. Nothing released in the 40s or 60s is included in this tabulation.

Before I get to the top 100 acts I'm gonna start with the 10 acts that "Bubbled Under" the top 100, in the #100-#110 positions.

Here is my #110 act of the 1950-1959 decade:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-09-30 19:37:00 UTC
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Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
in the #100-#110 positions.
Sorry, that should say the #101-110 positions.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-01 03:26:35 UTC
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We heard from #110 on my list, the legendary New Orleans guitar player, Earl King.
Real name Earl Johnson, and that's what he used when he recorded for Savoy. He's really best known for his early 60s recordings like "Trick Bag" and "Darling Honey Angel Child" aka "Come On." But he made several really good records in the 50s for labels like Ace and Specialty. The selection that we heard was "Baby You Can Get Your Gun" from 1955 on Ace. It was the flip side of his national hit record "Those Lonely Lonely Nights."

Okay, let's move on now to act #109 on the list:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-01 16:37:16 UTC
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We just heard act #109 on my list of favorite recording acts of the 1950s, Brownie McGhee. During the 50s he recorded for several labels under a few different names. He was on Savoy, Derby, Atlantic (as Spider Sam) and some other banners. The selection we heard was "Christina" which he did for Harlem in 1954. We could be hearing from his brother Granville later on in the countdown.

Next up we head to the west coast for act #108, and I'll send this one out to Diane:


DianeE
2013-10-02 01:00:36 UTC
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"The Bloomfield Buddy" <***@aol.com> wrote in message news:84ed0a15-0fbb-4a31-8ce0-***@googlegroups.com...
We just heard act #109 on my list of favorite recording acts of the 1950s,
Brownie McGhee. During the 50s he recorded for several labels under a few
different names. He was on Savoy, Derby, Atlantic (as Spider Sam) and some
other banners. The selection we heard was "Christina" which he did for
Harlem in 1954. We could be hearing from his brother Granville later on in
the countdown.

Next up we head to the west coast for act #108, and I'll send this one out
to Diane:

http://youtu.be/EscNU9Qj8d8
--------------
"A Fool In Paradise" by The Jewels, one of my favorite group harmony
records, and one that showed they could sing a pretty ballad just as well as
a rocker like "Hearts Of Stone" or "Keep Your Feet On The Floor."

DianeE
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-02 03:18:39 UTC
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We just heard "A Fool in Paradise" by the Jewels, who are the #108 act on my list. The Jewels were a very crude sounding R&B vocal group from Los Angeles, led by Johnny Torrence. It was their second release for Larry Goldberg and Al Schlesinger's R and B record label in Hollywood. It was the followup to their hit record "Hearts Of Stone" which was even bigger by the Charms and the Fontane Sisters although the Jewels version was the original. The uptempo song on the flip side (Oh Yes I Know) was the hit side of the single, which was released in October of 1954.

Picture of the Jewels - Loading Image...

They also made records for John Dolphin's Lucky label (as the Marbles) and later for Lew Chudd's Imperial banner. You can get the full Jewels story and discography in Unca Marv Goldberg;s excellent article about the group - http://www.uncamarvy.com/Jewels/jewels.html

Now it's time to move on top my #107 recording act of the 1950s. Click on the link below as we will hear a legendary R&B vocal group, also from the west coast.


Roger Ford
2013-10-02 10:28:19 UTC
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On Tue, 1 Oct 2013 20:18:39 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
We just heard "A Fool in Paradise" by the Jewels, who are the #108 act on m=
y list. The Jewels were a very crude sounding R&B vocal group from Los Ange=
les, led by Johnny Torrence. It was their second release for Larry Goldberg=
and Al Schlesinger's R and B record label in Hollywood. It was the followu=
p to their hit record "Hearts Of Stone" which was even bigger by the Charms=
and the Fontane Sisters although the Jewels version was the original. The =
uptempo song on the flip side (Oh Yes I Know) was the hit side of the singl=
e, which was released in October of 1954.
Picture of the Jewels - http://www.uncamarvy.com/Jewels/jewels05.jpg
They also made records for John Dolphin's Lucky label (as the Marbles) and =
later for Lew Chudd's Imperial banner. You can get the full Jewels story an=
d discography in Unca Marv Goldberg;s excellent article about the group - h=
ttp://www.uncamarvy.com/Jewels/jewels.html
Now it's time to move on top my #107 recording act of the 1950s. Click on t=
he link below as we will hear a legendary R&B vocal group, also from the we=
st coast.

This link don't open for me

Says "vi9deo not available"


ROGER FORD
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-02 15:10:42 UTC
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This link don't open for me Says "vi9deo not available"
Sorry, must be blocked in Europe or something. It's Lucky 009, the shorter title of the two sides.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-02 15:51:29 UTC
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We just heard "I Know" by the #107 act on the countdown, the Hollywood Flames. Released on the Swingtime label in 1953. The Hollywood Flames were known by most folks for their big 1957 crossover hit "Buzz, Buzz, Buzz" but they actually started making records back in 1950 on The Recorded in Hollywood label. The initial group was David Ford (first tenor), Willie Ray Rockwell (second tenor), Curlee Dinkins (baritone/bass), and Bobby Byrd (bass, baritone, tenor). Bobby Byrd is better known as Bobby Day of "Rockin' Robin" fame. Essentially Bobby Day's records, released as by Bobby Day and the Satellites, are really just Hollywood Flames records under a different name. It was a similar situation to records being released by Buddy Holly and by the Crickets at the same time.

They went on to release record for such labels as Unique, Specialty, Lucky, Swingtime and Ebb, which was a subsidiary if Specialty. "I Know" was released first on Swingtime but was also on Lucky and Decca. The group, or members thereof, sang on loads of west coast R&B records in the 1950s.

Here's what they looked like:

Loading Image...

Now it's time to move on to the next act in the countdown. Here's the act that came in at #106 on my list of favorite recording acts of the 1950s:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-02 18:36:02 UTC
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In case you want to follow this in a better technological forum where you can see all the pictures in the posts:

http://www.acclaimedmusic.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1269
Frank
2013-10-02 19:25:50 UTC
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Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
http://www.acclaimedmusic.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1269
Are the songs you're putting up "typical" of what they sounded like or your personal favorite by each act?
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-02 19:38:08 UTC
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Post by Frank
Are the songs you're putting up "typical" of what they sounded like or your personal favorite by each act?
The former. Although I may go atypical at times. None of the songs so far has been my favorite by that act.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-03 03:12:09 UTC
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We heard from my #106 act of the 1950s, the Larks, with their 1951 hit "Little Side Car." Like many of the R&B vocal groups of the day the Larks started out as a gospel group. From Marv Goldberg's article on the group:

"The history of the Larks begins with Thermon Ruth, who had formed the Selah Jubilee Singers in Brooklyn around 1927, By the 1940s, they were operating out of Raleigh, North Carolina and were composed of Thermon Ruth, Alden ("Allen") Bunn, Junius Parker, Melvin Coldten (who had been in the Norfolk Jazz Quartet and Norfolk Jubilee Quartet, starting in 1937), and Jimmy Gorham. The Selahs had a daily program of jubilee music that aired over WPTF in Raleigh, North Carolina."

They first made secular records in 1950 as the Jubilators on the Regal label and as the Four Barons on (my grandfather) Herman Lubinsky's Regent Label, a subsidiary of his Savoy label. They then hooked up with Bess Berman's Apollo label, where they made the bulk of their legendary records. Hard core R&B vocal harmony fans consider some of their records to be among the greatest of the genre, most specifically a version of the old standard "My Reverie." One of the members of the group, Gene Mumford, went on to become the lead singer of Billy Ward's Dominoes after Jackie Wilson left, and sang lead on their classic rendition of "Star Dust" in 1957.

Here's what the Larks looked like in the early 1950s.

Loading Image...

And now we move on ahead with the countdown. Next up is the #105 act on my list. This act is best known for doing the original version of one of the most famous songs of the 1950s.

Here is act #105:

Roger Ford
2013-10-03 05:39:50 UTC
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On Wed, 2 Oct 2013 20:12:09 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
And now we move on ahead with the countdown. Next up is the #105 act on my =
list. This act is best known for doing the original version of one of the m=
ost famous songs of the 1950s.=20
Here is act #105:

Big Mama was rarely less than excellent at this time. For the record
despite what the YouTube poster says the title of the song is "I Ain't
No Fool E ITHER" as per the original Peacock label
ROGER FORD
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-03 05:55:01 UTC
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For the record despite what the YouTube poster says the title of the song is "I Ain't No Fool E ITHER" as per the original Peacock label
Yes.

The first Caucasion act is coming up at #101.
Roger Ford
2013-10-03 06:04:10 UTC
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On Wed, 2 Oct 2013 22:55:01 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
For the record despite what the YouTube poster says the title of the song is "I Ain't No Fool E ITHER" as per the original Peacock label
Yes.
The first Caucasion act is coming up at #101.
"Love Letters In The Sand"? :)


ROGER FORD
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-03 06:24:59 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
"Love Letters In The Sand"? :)
I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for Pat.
Sharxster
2013-10-03 06:45:21 UTC
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Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
For the record despite what the YouTube poster says the title of
the song is "I Ain't No Fool E ITHER" as per the original
Peacock label
Yes.
The first Caucasion act is coming up at #101.
Why do you feel the need to delineate the race of the artist? It's
what comes out of the speakers that counts, NOT the colour of the
artist.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-03 06:49:28 UTC
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Post by Sharxster
Why do you feel the need to delineate the race of the artist?
Just giving folks some clues as to what is coming up.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-03 15:38:27 UTC
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We just heard "I Ain't No Fool, Either" from the #105 act on the countdown, Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton. She of course had the original version of "Hound Dog" in 1953. It was a smash hit number one R&B song released on Don Robey's Peacock label out of Houston, Texas. According to Pete Stoller, son of Mike Stoller, his father and Jerry Leiber had met Big Mama and were quite taken with her. She had teased the two (Jewish) white boys with sexual inuendo and the like. They wanted to write a song for her that fit her personality. Jerry at first wanted the chorus to be "You ain't nothin' but a motherfucker," but I guess they realized that that would not fly, so they went with "You Ain't Nothin' but a Hound Dog" instead. The original 78 lists the writers as J. Leiber - M Stoller - J. Otis. Johnny Otis, whose band played on the record, somehow finagled some of the writing credits at the time, although I don't think his name was there anymore by the time Elvis had done the song, aping the reworked lyrics courtesy of Freddie Bell and the Bellboys.

Big Mama had a bunch of good records on Peacock, and then in 1958 she released a great two sider on the little known Irma label (Don't Talk Back / Big Mama's Coming Home). The A side was a takeoff on Roy Hamilton's then recent hit "Don't Let Go" and the B side was a blues belter extrordanaire. Willie Mae was a lesbian who many times would dress like a man. Here's what she looked like in the 50s:

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

105 - Willie Mae (Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on to the #104 act in the countdown. The song that represents the act was more famously done a few years later by one of the legendary acts of the era.

Here's act #104:

The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-04 03:07:46 UTC
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We just heard "I'll Drown In My Tears" from the #104 act on the countdown, Lula Reed. She made that record with the Sonny Thompson Orchestra in 1952. The song become better known as "Drown In My Own Tears" when Ray Charles did it with that new title in 1956, and it was later done by Aretha Franklin in 1967. Lula Reed made several excellent records for Syd Nathan's King Record Label in the 1950s. She remained with Nathan's company into the 60s, sometimes being called Lulu Reed and sometimes having singles issued on Syd's Federal label rather than on King. I love her sexy voice and she was R&B all the way.

Not bad on the eyes either:

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae (Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we move on now to the #103 artist. Back to New Orleans we go for another local legend.


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-04 15:40:51 UTC
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We heard from act #103 on my countdown, James "Sugarboy" Crawford, with his 1957 rocker "I Don't Need You." Crawford was a legend around New Orleans. He started as a member of the Sha-Weez vocal group and then branched out on his own, releasing the legendary "Jock-A-Mo" on Leonard Chess' Checker subsidiary in 1954.

Loading Image...

This is the same song that was later a big pop chart hit for the Dixie Cups as "Iko, Iko." He recorded for Checker for a few years and then switched over to Imperial in the later 50s, which is where the selection that I featured came from. He died last year after a brief illness, but was active right up until then. He appeared on his grandson Davell Crawford's 1995 album, Let Them Talk. He made some stage appearances with Davell including one at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, and more recently at the seventh annual Ponderosa Stomp in April 2008.

Here's what he looked like in the 50s:

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on to act #102 in the countdown. Tis act is famous for writing and recording the original version of one of the greatest rock songs of all time. We're not gonna feature that one because everybody should know it already, but we are featuring another song that the act wrote and recorded that later became a cult classic in some other versions.

Here is act #102:


Frank
2013-10-04 18:02:10 UTC
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Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae (Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King
Didn't Lula sing lead on a recording or two with a girl's group in the early to mid '60s?
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-04 18:33:58 UTC
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Post by Frank
Didn't Lula sing lead on a recording or two with a girl's group in the early to mid '60s?
Not sure, maybe Roger knows.
Frank
2013-10-04 18:46:41 UTC
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Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Frank
Didn't Lula sing lead on a recording or two with a girl's group in the early to mid '60s?
Not sure, maybe Roger knows.
I know her name from somewhere, but it's not as a solo artist. Anyway, I listened to several of her songs yesterday and she's terrific.
Roger Ford
2013-10-04 21:09:03 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2013 11:33:58 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Frank
Didn't Lula sing lead on a recording or two with a girl's group in the early to mid '60s?
Not sure, maybe Roger knows.
Don't know of her with a girl group.

However she DOES have the male group "The Teeners" backing her on
several of her Argo cuts (apparently the same group that earlier
recorded as The De'bonaires)

Here's what I think is the best of her later Argo material. With the
Teeners backing here's Lula (or LULU as she is billed on the record
label) on a number from 1958 probably better known in the later Etta
James versiion




ROGER FORD
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-05 03:31:50 UTC
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Act #102 was Richard Berry and we heard his original version of "Have Love, Will Travel" from 1959. Berry was a big part of the west coast R&B scene and his performance as the narator on "Riot on Cell Block #9" by the Robins was counted towards his standing here, as well as his uncredited duet with Etta James on her huge hit "The Wallflower." I did not count his time with the Flairs. But suffice it to say Richard Berry was a major part of the California R&B scene and deserves to be somewhere on this list. He of course is most famous for writing and originally performing "Louie, Louie" along with his then vocal group the Pharaohs.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on to that promised initial caucasion on the list at #101.


Roger Ford
2013-10-05 06:07:50 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2013 20:31:50 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Act #102 was Richard Berry and we heard his original version of "Have Love,=
Will Travel" from 1959. Berry was a big part of the west coast R&B scene a=
nd his performance as the narator on "Riot on Cell Block #9" by the Robins =
was counted towards his standing here, as well as his uncredited duet with =
Etta James on her huge hit "The Wallflower." I did not count his time with =
the Flairs. But suffice it to say Richard Berry was a major part of the Cal=
ifornia R&B scene and deserves to be somewhere on this list. He of course i=
s most famous for writing and originally performing "Louie, Louie" along wi=
th his then vocal group the Pharaohs.
http://www.nndb.com/people/278/000044146/richard-berry-sized.jpg
A recap of the countdown so far:=20
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford=20
104 - Lula Reed=20
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton=20
106 - The Larks=20
107 - The Hollywood Flames=20
108 - The Jewels=20
109 - Brownie McGhee=20
110 - Earl King=20
And now we move on to that promised initial caucasion on the list at #101.=
=20
http://youtu.be/I_IrqRhAwlQ
Reasonable enough version but Jerry Lee on this one is just soooooo
DEFINITIVE that it swamps every other reading of the song (including
Big Maybelle).


ROGER FORD
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-05 06:28:49 UTC
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Reasonable enough version but Jerry Lee on this one is just soooooo DEFINITIVE that it swamps every other reading of the song (including Big Maybelle).
As you know I don't see it that way. I prefer this version by a bit over the Jerry Lee version.
Roger Ford
2013-10-05 06:45:57 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2013 23:28:49 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Reasonable enough version but Jerry Lee on this one is just soooooo DEFINITIVE that it swamps every other reading of the song (including Big Maybelle).
As you know I don't see it that way. I prefer this version by a bit over the Jerry Lee version.
I know that and it puzzles me that while having fairly close opinions
of a lot of records we are so *very* far apart on this one kinda in
the same way as with "Mean Woman Blues" and Jerry Lee on that one too
ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-05 06:54:25 UTC
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I know that and it puzzles me that while having fairly close opinions of a lot of records we are so *very* far apart on this one kinda in the same way as with "Mean Woman Blues" and Jerry Lee on that one too
================================================================
I don't much like the middle of the Jerry Lee version when it slows down and he starts talking. That tips the scales the other way for me. They both are pretty high on my all time list anyway.

85 ¦ Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On ¦ Roy Hall - 55
100 ¦ Whole Lot of Shakin' Going On ¦ Jerry Lee Lewis - 57
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-05 14:30:45 UTC
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We just heard from act #102 on my countdown, Roy Hall. Roy was born all the way back in 1922 and did a lot of country and country boogie before becoming a full fledged rockabilly act at the age of 33 in 1955. We featured his raw version of "Whole Ltta Shakin' Goin' On" from 1955, which was two years BEFORE the Jerry Lee Lewis version. Still, Roy's reading was the not the original version. That honor belongs to another act that may be coming up later on this countdown. Roy had a killer two sider in 1956 (Digging The Boogie / Three Alley Cats) and did several other good covers and remakes of other R&B hits. His greatest records came on the Decca label but he also recorded in the 50s for Fortune and Bullet.

Loading Image...

And now we are ready to start the Top 100 countdown proper.

A recap of the countdown so far:

101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

We will kick off the top 100 with an act that is much better known for its classic early to mid-1960s material, but in my opinion its 50s material was almost as strong. Let's head down to Memphis for the #100 act:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-06 02:46:53 UTC
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We heard the #100 act on the list, Roy Orbison and his original version of "Go, Go Go" which was later done more famously by Jerry Lee Lewis as "Down The Line," on the flip side of his 1958 hit song "Breathless." Jerry may even be on this list, you never know :-). This Roy Orbison song was on the flip side of his 1956 hit "Ooby Dooby" on Sam Phillips' Sun Record Label out of Memphis. Roy made several real good records for Sun in the 50s including things like "Rockhouse" and "Sweet And Easy To Love." He also did a demo version of the song he wrote (Claudette) for the Everly Brothers. It was eventually released on an album many years later and did count towards his standing here. Here's what Roy looked like in the mid-50s.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:


100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on to the act that is #99 on this list of my favorite recording acts of the 1950s. Like Orbison a rock and roll hall of famer:

This one goes out to my GOOD friend, Michael Pendragon:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-06 14:54:59 UTC
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We heard from the #99 act in the countdown, LaVern Baker. She first recorded in the 1940s as "Little Miss Cornshucks," before becoming the female vocalist with Todd Rhodes orchestra for a while. The song we heard to represent her slot is her version of "Gimme A Pigfoot" from her 1958 album "LaVern Baker Sings Bessie Smith."

Loading Image...

LaVern made most of her classic 1950s sides for Atlantic Records, things like "Jim Dandy," "Tweedle Dee," "I Cried A Tear" and "Soul On Fire" along with several others. Like most Atlantic acts she was backed up vocally by the Cues, who on her records were listed as the Gliders. She was also known for her open mocking of Georgia Gibbs, who had covered some of her hits. She was pretty hot looking in the 50s too:

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:


99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------

101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on to act #98 on my list, a west coast giant who would ne higher on my 1940s list:


Roger Ford
2013-10-06 15:14:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 5 Oct 2013 19:46:53 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
We heard the #100 act on the list, Roy Orbison and his original version of =
"Go, Go Go" which was later done more famously by Jerry Lee Lewis as "Down =
The Line," on the flip side of his 1958 hit song "Breathless." Jerry may ev=
en be on this list, you never know :-). This Roy Orbison song was on the fl=
ip side of his 1956 hit "Ooby Dooby" on Sam Phillips' Sun Record Label out =
of Memphis. Roy made several real good records for Sun in the 50s including=
things like "Rockhouse" and "Sweet And Easy To Love." He also did a demo v=
ersion of the song he wrote (Claudette) for the Everly Brothers. It was eve=
ntually released on an album many years later and did count towards his sta=
nding here. Here's what Roy looked like in the mid-50s.
http://iaanhughes.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/royorb2011fp.jpg
Over here in 1957 we got a nice EP of Roy's Sun tracks including "Go
Go Go".The other tracks were "You're My Baby","Rockhouse" and "Ooby
Dooby".You can see the EP here :-

http://www.45cat.com/record/res1089

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-06 15:20:08 UTC
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You can see the EP here :- http://www.45cat.com/record/res1089
Interesting how you folks depicted what the singer looked like as compared to what he really looked like.
Roger Ford
2013-10-06 17:17:55 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Oct 2013 08:20:08 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
You can see the EP here :- http://www.45cat.com/record/res1089
Interesting how you folks depicted what the singer looked like as compared to what he really looked like.
There were dozens of London EPs at this time with similar "drawn"
covers. Don't think they were supposed to depict the artist himself as
much as to illustrate the general "theme" or title of the collection
(here it's just your average hillbilly). Tho it's true that nobody
here had seen Orbison in 1957. This EP was his debut UK release. It
would be June 1960 before his next release here. That was "Only The
Lonely" and it was his very first UK single..

Here's the cover of the London Howlin' Wolf EP in similar style :-

http://c86.tumblr.com/post/48440321692/rhythm-and-blues-with-howlin-wolf-1957-via




ROGER FORD
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"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-06 17:21:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
Here's the cover of the London Howlin' Wolf EP in similar style
I wonder if he's gonna make the list?
Sharxster
2013-10-07 04:42:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Roger Ford
Here's the cover of the London Howlin' Wolf EP in similar style
I wonder if he's gonna make the list?
In the REAL WORLD? Not. A. Chance.
Roger Ford
2013-10-06 15:27:18 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 5 Oct 2013 19:46:53 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
And now we move on to the act that is #99 on this list of my favorite recor=
http://youtu.be/K19BW-tM904
Ah yes,the lady who railed so passionately against cover versions and
would never dream of being involved in anything like that herself :)



ROGER FORD
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"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
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Roger Ford
2013-10-03 05:34:53 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 2 Oct 2013 08:10:42 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
This link don't open for me Says "vi9deo not available"
Sorry, must be blocked in Europe or something. It's Lucky 009, the shorter title of the two sides.
http://youtu.be/3DZfMtr75Sfh4
No its not blocked here.

It's the link that is at fault---over here at least. For some reason
that "3D" bit gets added after the "=" in the link when it appears on
my screen. Anyone know why this is happening? Anyway THAT is what is
causing the problem.

Take the offending "3D" away and the link takes me to the splendid "I
Know" by The Hollywood Flames



ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
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Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-03 05:55:58 UTC
Permalink
Take the offending "3D" away and the link takes me to the splendid "I Know" by The Hollywood Flames
The 3D is not in what I posted.
Roger Ford
2013-10-03 06:05:25 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 2 Oct 2013 22:55:58 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Take the offending "3D" away and the link takes me to the splendid "I Know" by The Hollywood Flames
The 3D is not in what I posted.
I know and I don't understand how or why it gets there en route across
the Atlantic. That's what I was saying


ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
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Dennis C
2013-10-06 15:20:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Just finished putting together my 100 favorite recording acts of the 1950s. The list is based only on records either released during the 1950-1959 period, or recorded during that period and not issued until many years later. Nothing released in the 40s or 60s is included in this tabulation.
Before I get to the top 100 acts I'm gonna start with the 10 acts that "Bubbled Under" the top 100, in the #100-#110 positions.
http://youtu.be/_w8QWTAnb5I
You Orbison( Elvis Pressley's favorite singer) insultingly rated too low here!!

I sort of get it though. Gathering up all the white Roys in one discriminating clump and filing them away. Why don't you toss in Roy Fuckin' Rogers and leave a Happy Trails to You on this equine scatological exercise, baby


Dennis C from Tennessee
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-06 15:29:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dennis C
Orbison( Elvis Pressley's favorite singer) insultingly rated too low here!!
Only his 50s material counts towards this ranking. He'll be higher on my 60s list.
Dennis C
2013-10-06 19:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Just finished putting together my 100 favorite recording acts of the 1950s. The list is based only on records either released during the 1950-1959 period, or recorded during that period and not issued until many years later. Nothing released in the 40s or 60s is included in this tabulation.
Before I get to the top 100 acts I'm gonna start with the 10 acts that "Bubbled Under" the top 100, in the #100-#110 positions.

I wonder if he's gonna make the list?

I say he makes the list!!!
My prediction is that he finishes 23rd right beween Percy Faith and Frank Chacksfield, baby!!!!!

Dennis C from Tennessee
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-07 02:34:16 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from the #98 act on my list, the great Roy Milton with his 1951 blockbuster "Best Wishes" on Art Rupe's Specialty label. Originally from Oklahoma, Roy relocated to California in 1933 and by the early 40s he led one of the best R&B bands in the Los Angeles area. He became one of the first R&B acts to own his own record labels when he started labels like Miltone and Foto around 1946. In all he had 21 hits on the Billboard R&B charts, with the last two coming in 1961. Roy was a drummer who was the leader of the band, and also was the main vocalist.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------

101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on up to the #97 act on the list, another Rock And Roll Hall of Famer who was an international sensation for a few short years in the 50s.


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-07 16:39:55 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from my #97 recording act of the 1950s, Frankie L.....Frankie L......sorry about that stuttering, no it was NOT Frankie Laine, it was Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers. They exploded on to the music scene with their first release "Why Do Fools Fall In Love" on the Gee label in December of 1955. The song became a top 10 hit on the U.S. Pop charts and went to #1 on the UK Pop charts. The lead singer and co-writer of the song was a then 13 year old boy.
The group followed that with several other doo wop classics like "I Want You To Be My Girl" and "The ABC's Of Love" and "I Promise To Remember." The song we heard was their 1957 release of "Teenage Love." One of the most influential singing voices in rock history, Frankie unfortunately lost that voice as he went through puberty and ended up dying of a drug overdose at the age of 25 in 1968.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:


97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------

101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now let's move on up to the act that came in at #96 on my list. It's an act that made much better records in the 40s IMO but still made enough very good ones after that to make my 1950s list. This one comes from 1950:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-08 03:21:21 UTC
Permalink
We heard from the #96 act on the list, Ivory Joe Hunter. The song was "Jumping At The Dew Drop" from 1950. Ivory Joe was originally from Texas but he rose to prominence while living in California and released his first record (Blues At Sunrise) on his own Ivory Record label. It became a national R&B chart hit in 1945. He also started the Pacific Label where he recorded what I think are his best records. It's a cool looking label, I have one of the 78s hanging on my wall here.

Here's what the lbael looks like:

Loading Image...

He then had some big hits in the 50s including the original version of "I Almost Lost My Mind," a number one R&B chart hit in 1950. The song was later
(1956) a number one pop chart hit for Pat Boone. His most famous song nowadays is his 1956 hit "Since I Met You Baby" which came while he was recording for Ahmet Ertegun's Atlantic Label.

Here's what he looked like in the 50s:

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we move along in the countdown it's time for act #95. Another Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, this guy was born in Teaneck, New Jersey in 1940 and by the time he was 18 years old he had already become one of the best selling recording acts in the USA. Here is act #95:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-08 15:36:17 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from the #95 act in the countdown, Ricky Nelson. The selection was the Bo Diddley inspired "A Long Vacation" from his 4th album (Songs By Ricky), which is from the latter part of 1959. The song was later issued on a single and bubbled under the Billboard Hot 100, stalling at #120 in the summer of 1963.

Ricky decided that he wanted to be a singer when he was 16 years old. With his dad's connections and the TV show that he was then starring in, and his Elvis like looks, all he needed to be able to do was half way carry a tune and he'd be a huge success. As it turned out he was a pretty good singer, and had excellent taste in music, as Carl Perkins was his favorite artist. He also loved Fats Domino and Elvis and some of the other major rock and roll acts of the day. After releasing three hit songs on Verve Records, his father finagled a 10 year contract out of Lew Chudd's Imperial Records and it was off to the races. By the end of 1962 he had already had 24 different songs that were top 20 national pop chart hits, and seven different hit albums too. He was the second rock and roll act to have a nummber one album, after Elvis.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Now let's move on to the act that came in at #94 on the list.


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-09 02:41:17 UTC
Permalink
We just heard "Sweet Home Chicago" from the #94 act on the countdown, Little Jr. Parker. Real name, Herman, his biggest influence as a harmonica player was Sonny Boy Williamson, with whom he worked before moving on to work for Howlin' Wolf in 1949. Around 1950 he was a member of Memphis's ad hoc group, the Beale Streeters, with Bobby 'Blue' Bland and B.B. King.

Junior started his recording career as a headliner on The Bihari Brothers' Modern label in 1952 which brought him to the attention of Sam Phillips who signed him to his Sun label. At that time his band was billed as Little Junior's Blue Flames. They had a big hit for Sun in 1953, Feelin' Good" and also that year they released the original version of "Mystery Train," a song that would later be done by Elvis Presley as his 5th and final release on Sun in 1955. Junior then went on to record a bunch of excellent sides for Don Robey's Duke label in Houston, even making the pop charts twice in the 50s and several more times in the 60s.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on to the #93 act on the list. This act first rose to prominence as the vocalist on one of the biggest R&B records of 1944:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-09 14:39:34 UTC
Permalink
We just heard "Person To Person," a 1952 track from the #93 act on my list, Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson. Eddie first became well known as the vocalist on the 1944 Cootie Williams blockbuster "Cherry Red." He went out on his own shortly after that and had three R&B chart hits in the late 1940s. In the 50s he continued to record for Syd Nathan's King label and released a bunch of excellent sides. Eddie was a saxophone player who sported a shaved head decades before it became popular. That started when his hair was accidentally destroyed by lye contained in a hair straightening product.

He started out as a jazz player with several different bands in the 1930s, and HIS band included a young Jon Coltrane in 1952 and 1953. In the late 1960s, touring in a strict jazz capacity with Jay McShann, Vinson's career took an upswing. In the early 1960s Vinson moved to Los Angeles and began working with the Johnny Otis Revue. A 1970 appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival with Otis spurred a bit of a comeback for Vinson. Throughout the 1970s he worked high-profile blues and jazz sessions for Count Basie, Johnny Otis, Roomful of Blues, Arnett Cobb, and Buddy Tate. He also composed steadily, including "Tune Up" and "Four", both of which have been incorrectly attributed to Miles Davis. Vinson recorded extensively during his fifty-odd year career and performed regularly in Europe and the U.S.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now let's move on in the countdown. The #92 act on the list is another Rock And Roll Hall of Famer. This act was one of the biggest influences on early piano playing rock and rollers:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-10 02:18:31 UTC
Permalink
We heard "Rockin' With Fes" by Professor Longhair aka Roy Byrd, the #92 act on the list. Longhair was the most important figure in the development of New Orleans R&B which became huge in the 50s and early 60s, with artists like Fats Domino, Lloyd Price and others becoming big national stars. His "Go To The Mardi Gras" from 1959 became the anthem of all Mardi Gras celebrations from that point on. The record was an update of his "Mardi Gras In New Orleans" from the early part of the decade.

Loading Image...

Longhair recorded for many labels in the 50s, including Atlantic, Mercury, Ebb and Ron. His song "Tipitina" was taken and used for the name of the most important music Venue in the city, Tipitina's.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move up to the #91 act on the list. another Rock And Roll Hall of Famer:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-10 15:26:11 UTC
Permalink
We heard "Baby Loves Him," a 1957 track from the act that came in here at #91, Wanda Jackson. Wanda was the top female rockabilly act of all time. The only one who came close to her was Janis Martin. First recording as a country act for Decca, Wanda hit her stride when she moved over to Capitol Records in 1956. It was there where she released rockabilly classics like "Hot Dog! That made Him Mad," "Fujiama Mama" and "Mean Mean Man." Her career culminated in a Rock And Roll Hall of Fame induction in 2009. "Fujiama Mama" was a remake of a 1955 record from Annisteen Allen, and Wanda's version hit #1 in Japan.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:


91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Let's move up now to the act that came in at #90. They formed in 1952 while in high school and at first were called the El Rays. Here is act #90:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-10 22:03:04 UTC
Permalink
Let me explain how this list was derived.

I rate every song I own on this scale:

10 - Incredibly Awesome
9 - Great
8 - Excellent
7 - Very Good
6 - Good
5 - Pretty Good
4 - Okay
3 - Not Very Good
2 - Bad
1 - Terrible
0 - Unbelievably Horrible

I use the numbers 0 through 10 to represent each ranking, but that is not in line with their value here. Two songs that are "very good" (7) are nowhere near as valuable as one song that is Incredibly Awesome (10). So here's how I valued them for the purposes of this list.

Incredibly Awesome - 10 points
Great - 6 Points
Excellent - 4 Points
Very Good - 2 Points
Good - 1 point

Anything less than good does not count towards an act's total.

I then went through every MP3 I owned from the 50s and gave each artist the values listed above for each song with that rating. The #100 act on the list (Roy Orbison) had 40 points. The top act on the list has 373 points, just nosing out the #2 act which had 369 points. They were both far ahead of the #3 act which had 269 points.

#95, Ricky Nelson had 43 points. Here's a breakdown of that:

[u][b]EXECELLENT (4 points each)[/b][/u]
Be-Bop Baby
I'm Walkin'
Stood Up
Believe What You Say
Lonesome Town
Poor Little Fool
It's Late

[u][b]VERY GOOD (2 points each)[/b][/u]
If You Can't Rock Me
Waitin' In School
I'm In Love Again
A Long Vacation
Never Be Anyone Else But You
You Tear Me Up

[u][b]GOOD (1 point each)[/b][/u]
I Got A Feeling
My Bucket's Got A Hole In It
Just A Little Too Much

Any record that I rate as pretty good (5) or lower does not count towards this.

So it's 7 songs at 4 points each (28) plus 6 songs at 2 points each (12) and 3 songs at 1 point each (3)

28+12+3 = 43

Songs are listed based on the year of release. In most cases an act can only get credit for one version of a song, so alternate takes and live versions of the same song do not count extra for that act. I only count the highest rated version of the song by each act. Anything that was unissued at the time and did not come out until many years later on a compilation counts towards when it was recorded. In most cases when a record features two different acts, both acts will get full credit for that record's rating. For instance, if there's a great (9) record by the Supremes and the Temptations together (I'm Gonna Make You Love Me), each act gets the 6 points for that record added to their total.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-11 02:27:49 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from act #90 on the countdown, the Dells, with their 1957 blockbuster "Why Do You Have To Go." Over the course of a 40+ year career the Dells went from Doo Wop to Soul seemlessly and had hit records in the 50s,
60s, 70s, and 80s. They had a top 20 Black Chart hit as late as 1980. In all those years as the Dells there was only one real change in the makeup of the group, with Johnny Carter replacing Johnny Funches in 1960. The other 4 members, Marvin Junior, Verne Allison, Chuck Barksdale, and Mickey McGill were in the group for 50+ years. Before they had changed their name to the Dells they were known as the El Rays and McGill's brother Lucius was a member at that time.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:


90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Next up is the #89 act on the list with a song that is one of the best examples of New York City R&B vocal group harmony of the 1950s:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-11 16:23:45 UTC
Permalink
The #89 act on the countdown was the Solitaires and we heard their 1956 killer "The Angels Sang" which was first issued with a different title (You're Back With Me). Perhaps the quintissential New York City R&B vocal group, the Solitaires released their first record in 1954 on Hy Weiss's Old Town label. They remained on Old Town throughout the 50s and even after that. After their first record or two, Milton Love joined the group and remained as the lead singer on most of their records from then on. Probably their best known song is "Walking Along" from 1957. The song was later a chart hit for the Diamonds.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:


89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Moving on now to act #88 on the countdown, they were Syd Nathan's answer to Bill Haley and the Comets:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-12 02:56:14 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from act #88 on my list, Boyd Bennett and His Rockets with their 1956 release "Rabbit Eye Pink And Charcoal Black." Boyd Bennett was the band's leader but the vocalist on most of their records was Jim "Big Moe" Muzey. Their biggest record was "Seventeen" which was a Top 5 pop chart hit in 1955, but they made a bunch of other good records between 1954 and 1957 for Syd Nathan's King label. Later in the 50s they made some records for Mercury. The band sounded similar to Bill Haley and the Comets, a white band doing their take on rhythm and blues.

Boyd Bennett is in the white suit with Big Moe right in the middle on the bottom.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:


88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we move on down to the #87 act in the countdown, this singer produced the Five Americans hit "Western Union" in 1967:


Roger Ford
2013-10-12 08:09:23 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 11 Oct 2013 19:56:14 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
We just heard from act #88 on my list, Boyd Bennett and His Rockets with th=
eir 1956 release "Rabbit Eye Pink And Charcoal Black." Boyd Bennett was the=
band's leader but the vocalist on most of their records was Jim "Big Moe" =
Muzey. Their biggest record was "Seventeen" which was a Top 5 pop chart hit=
in 1955, but they made a bunch of other good records between 1954 and 1957=
for Syd Nathan's King label. Later in the 50s they made some records for M=
ercury. The band sounded similar to Bill Haley and the Comets, a white band=
doing their take on rhythm and blues. =20
Boyd Bennett is in the white suit with Big Moe right in the middle on the b=
ottom.
http://acerecords.co.uk/images/Boyd-Bennett.jpg
My personal favorite Bennett release has always been the 1958 "Move"
that dispenses with Big Moe's vocals for a change and instead features
the vocal talents of the then Rockets bass player Skip Pendergraff. He
wasn't credited that way tho instead adopting the monniker "Cecil
McNabb Jr" for the release which appeared as King 5115.This one always
used to sail straight out of our record store on the rare occasions we
got hold of copies.



On the subject of "McNabb",from the same session that produced "Move",
he also gifted King with their next single #5116 a little number
called "Clock Tickin' Rhythm" that sold enormously for us (thanks
Henry :). I don't think it's half as good but others may not agree.
You be the judge.



And surely any discussion of Bennett & The Rockets must mention their
original King LP from 1958 that is today one of the rarest and most
sought after albums from the era. You can see it in all its glory here
in amongst a selection of other King/Federal albums guaranteed to have
you drooling

http://vinylbeat.com/album-40-King.html





ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-12 14:59:13 UTC
Permalink
My personal favorite Bennett release has always been the 1958 "Move" that dispenses with Big Moe's vocals for a change and instead features the vocal talents of the then Rockets bass player Skip Pendergraff. He wasn't credited that way tho instead adopting the monniker "Cecil McNabb Jr" for the release which appeared as King 5115. This one always used to sail straight out of our record store on the rare occasions we got hold of copies.
same session that produced "Move", he also gifted King with their next single #5116 a little number called "Clock Tickin' Rhythm" that sold enormously for us (thanks Henry :). I don't think it's half as good but others may not agree.
================================================================

"Move" is okay but I like "Clock" a lot. Never knew the connection between McNabb and Boyd Bennett. I have a nice DJ copy of "Clock" but unfortunately it's got a bad double crack in it for the first half of the grooves.

My favorite by them is "Hit That Jive Jack" with "Seventeen" a close second.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-12 15:44:42 UTC
Permalink
We heard "Wild Wild World" by the #87 act on the list, Dale Hawkins. His "Susie Q" is one of the most enduring classics of the 50s, but he made several other excellent records for the Checker label. Things like "Four Letter Word...Rock," "See You Soon, Baboon" and the often remade "Little Pig." A very young James Burton played lead guitar on "Susie Q."

Hawkins later became a record producer, and found success with The Uniques' "Not Too Long Ago," the Five Americans' "Western Union," Jon & Robin's "Do It Again – A Little Bit Slower." He served as executive vice president of Abnak Records; Vice President, Southwest Division, Bell Records (here he produced Bruce Channel, Ronnie Self, James Bell, the Festivals, the Dolls, and the Gentrys); and A&R director, RCA West Coast Rock Division, working with Michael Nesmith and Harry Nilsson. In the 1990s, he produced "Goin Back to Mississippi" by R. L. Burnside's slide guitarist, Kenny Brown

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A recap of the countdown so far:

87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move on up to the act that finished at #86 on the list. A very versatile singer who sang with many different groups, his untimely death at the age of 26 in 1960 was not as well publicized as the deaths of Buddy Holly, Johnny Ace and Eddie Cochran, but it was a great loss for rock and roll.


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-12 15:49:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
"Move" is okay but I like "Clock" a lot.
"Move is better than I remembered." I still like "Clock" better, but both songs get a "7" (very good) on my scale.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-13 02:15:19 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from act #86 on the list, Jesse Belvin, as the lead singer of the Gassers. Jesse fronted many different groups and sang tenor in a couple of others, along with many solo releases. His most famous song is probably "Goodnight My Love" from 1956. I counted all of his recordings with and without vocal groups towards this ranking. Also counted were his duets as Jesse and Marvin and the Cliques. He recorded for almost every major west coast label at various times, Modern, Specialty, Cash/Money, Aladdin, etc/... and ended up on a major label, RCA, by the end of the decade. He was probably THE most important singer for the west coast R&B vocal group sound of the era.

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A recap of the countdown so far:

86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Now let's move on up the list to the #85 act. It will be represented with a 1959recording that is several years ahead of its time:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-13 16:19:09 UTC
Permalink
We heard "If I, Oh I" from the #85 act on the list, Nolan Strong and the Diablos. Nolan Strong was Smokey Robinson's biggest influence, as the Diablos were a Detroit group that was very big locally when Smokey was in high school. You can hear Smokey's falsetto sound in Nolan's voice. The Diablos most famous record is their 1954 classic "The Wind," but they made lots of good records for Jack and Devora Brown's Fortune label. Berry Gordy wanted to buy their contract badly but the Brown's refused to sell. This led to Gordy signing the guys that became the Temptations as Berry felt that if he could not get the Diablos he would put his own group together to record the type songs he had in mind for them. He even covered one of Nolan Strong's hit records records (Mind Over Matter) with the Temptations and called them the Pirates on that release, to try and get back at the Browns for their refusal to let him have the Diablos.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King


As me move on up the list, the #84 act is next:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-14 02:17:28 UTC
Permalink
We just heard "That Ain't Nothin' But Right," a 1956 rockabilly classic from the act that came in at #84 on the countdown, Mac Curtis. Mac was only 17 years old when he started making records for King Records that year. Curtis hailed from Fort Worth, Texas. He later became a DJ and also made some country records, including several chart hits in the late 60s and early 70s. But he's on THIS list for his great 1950s rockabilly sides, songs like "Grandaddy's Rockin'" and "If I Had Me A Woman" and his biggest seller "You Ain't Treatin' Me Right" which Alan Freed played the hell out of in New York City.

Loading Image...

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Next at #83 is an act that I always associate with Mac Curtis. Ironically they tied with the same point total in this tally, with this act being placed higher due to having the best single song that either act ever released:


Roger Ford
2013-10-14 05:41:36 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 19:17:28 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
We just heard "That Ain't Nothin' But Right," a 1956 rockabilly classic fro=
m the act that came in at #84 on the countdown, Mac Curtis. Mac was only 17=
years old when he started making records for King Records that year. Curti=
s hailed from Fort Worth, Texas. He later became a DJ and also made some co=
untry records, including several chart hits in the late 60s and early 70s. =
But he's on THIS list for his great 1950s rockabilly sides, songs like "Gra=
ndaddy's Rockin'" and "If I Had Me A Woman" and his biggest seller "You Ain=
't Treatin' Me Right" which Alan Freed played the hell out of in New York C=
ity.
http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/49615011/Mac+Curtis+maccurtis2.jpg
http://koolsville.com/WebRoot/LCN/Shops/www_koolsville_com/500E/8341/7F21/C=
086/7843/0A0C/05E8/8803/Mac-Curtis-Poster.jpg
My favorite by Mac Curtis is "Grandaddy's Rockin'" which like most of
his other singles never saw light of day on this side of the pond.

The one Curtis record we DID get here was his biggest seller (courtesy
Alan Freed who featured him in one of his stage extravaganzas) "You
Ain't Treatin' Me Right" which appeared on the very pre-Beatles
Parlophone label. According to local legend the record famously
recieved just ONE play on BBC radio here. Today it is one of the
rarest of all 50's UK 45RPM pressings easily commanding four figure
sums for a decent copy.

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-14 14:34:36 UTC
Permalink
Act #83 is Charlie Feathers and we just heard "Get With It" which was one of his great 1950s releases. It was issued on the Meteor label:

Loading Image...

Charlie Feathers is one of the "Big Four" acts among rockabilly fans. The other three have not yet shown up on this list (Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Johnny Burnette Trio) but perhaps one or two of them will. Charlie co-wrote Elvis Presley's biggest hit record on the Sun Label, "I Forgot To Remember To Forget," which was a monstrous country chart hit in 1955. But he is on my list for his awesome rockabilly records from the 50s. He had one of the greatest two siders in history on the King label late in 1956 (One Hand Loose / Bottle To The Baby) along with several other killer sides. The reason I think of him and Mac Curtis together is because they each made their best records or the King label and because the first time that those records were reissued with good sound quality on an album Charlie and Mac shared that album, an album that my friend Roger Ford helped put together:

Loading Image...

I played the fuck out of that album for years. Feathers was quite a character. If you believed him you;d think that he created rockabilly and that he produced Presley's records on Sun rather than Sam Phillips. Here's a picture of Charlie with his band, Jody and Jerry. Charlie is the hillbilly in the middle.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

We're gonna change styles drastically now as we move up to the #82 act on the list. An act that rarely gets mentioned here in the group:


Sharxster
2013-10-15 00:27:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Act #83 is Charlie Feathers and we just heard "Get With It" which
was one of his great 1950s releases. It was issued on the Meteor
http://rcs-discography.com/rcs/pics/06/6255.jpg
Charlie Feathers is one of the "Big Four" acts among rockabilly
fans. The other three have not yet shown up on this list (Elvis
Presley, Carl Perkins, Johnny Burnette Trio) but perhaps one or
two of them will. Charlie co-wrote Elvis Presley's biggest hit
record on the Sun Label, "I Forgot To Remember To Forget," which
was a monstrous country chart hit in 1955. But he is on my list
for his awesome rockabilly records from the 50s. He had one of
the greatest two siders in history on the King label late in 1956
(One Hand Loose / Bottle To The Baby) along with several other
killer sides. The reason I think of him and Mac Curtis together
is because they each made their best records or the King label
and because the first time that those records were reissued with
good sound quality on an album Charlie and Mac shared that album,
http://www.raucousrecords.com/products/600px/mac-curtis-charlie-feathers-rockabilly.jpg
I played the fuck out of that album for years. Feathers was quite
a character. If you believed him you;d think that he created
rockabilly and that he produced Presley's records on Sun rather
than Sam Phillips. Here's a picture of Charlie with his band,
Jody and Jerry. Charlie is the hillbilly in the middle.
http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/53337661/Charlie+Feathers+with+Jody++Jerry+ddddddd.jpg
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
86 - Jesse Belvin
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
91 - Wanda Jackson
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
95 - Ricky Nelson
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
We're gonna change styles drastically now as we move up to the
#82 act on the list. An act that rarely gets mentioned here in
http://youtu.be/gx1_UE2jNF4
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-15 00:32:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
99 - LaVern Baker
So you don't hate L. Baker like your asshole buddy Mike.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-15 02:12:18 UTC
Permalink
We heard "You Should Care For Me," a great ballad by the #82 act on the list, the Flairs. The Flairs were a prolific vocal group from Los Angeles that at various times had famous members such as Richard Berry, Arthur Lee Maye, Young Jessie and Cornell Gunter. All went on to other fame as solo artists or with other groups (Gunter - Coasters) and in Maye's instance, as a major league baseball player playing in the same outfield as Hank Aaron. Maye led the National League in doubles in 1964.

Loading Image...

The Flairs made most of their records for Hollywood and Flair, but also recorded for ABC and some other labels along the way. Some of their best known songs were things like "I Had A Love" and "She Wants To Rock" and "This Is The Night For Love."

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:


82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King


And now we move on up to the act that came in at #81 on the list. Back to New Orleans we go:


Sharxster
2013-10-15 05:37:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
99 - LaVern Baker
So you don't hate L. Baker like your asshole buddy Mike.
I don't HAVE any "asshole buddies"--that's more like what Dean and
peneny are into. Dennis--I'm not sure...yet.
Roger Ford
2013-10-15 12:43:49 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 14 Oct 2013 07:34:36 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Act #83 is Charlie Feathers and we just heard "Get With It" which was one o=
http://rcs-discography.com/rcs/pics/06/6255.jpg
Charlie Feathers is one of the "Big Four" acts among rockabilly fans. The o=
ther three have not yet shown up on this list (Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins,=
Johnny Burnette Trio) but perhaps one or two of them will. Charlie co-wrot=
e Elvis Presley's biggest hit record on the Sun Label, "I Forgot To Remembe=
r To Forget," which was a monstrous country chart hit in 1955. But he is on=
my list for his awesome rockabilly records from the 50s. He had one of the=
greatest two siders in history on the King label late in 1956 (One Hand Lo=
ose / Bottle To The Baby) along with several other killer sides. The reason=
I think of him and Mac Curtis together is because they each made their bes=
t records or the King label and because the first time that those records w=
ere reissued with good sound quality on an album Charlie and Mac shared tha=
http://www.raucousrecords.com/products/600px/mac-curtis-charlie-feathers-ro=
ckabilly.jpg
I played the fuck out of that album for years. Feathers was quite a charact=
er. If you believed him you;d think that he created rockabilly and that he =
produced Presley's records on Sun rather than Sam Phillips. Here's a pictur=
e of Charlie with his band, Jody and Jerry. Charlie is the hillbilly in the=
middle.
http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/53337661/Charlie+Feathers+with+Jody++Je=
rry+ddddddd.jpg
If you go to alt.binaries.rock-n-roll and check out the file
"Memphis68" you'll see a pic of Charlie Feathers taken circa 1968
outside Tom Phillips' Select-O-Hits warehouse gbuilding in Memphis.

He's flanked by a couple of British fans who were conducting one of
the first interviews ever held with the singer. The one on the right
is my friend Jumpin' Jim Loader who'd moved out to Canada by that time
and was currently residing in Toronto.

The dark incredibly handsome one on the left? Well I let you guess but
suffice to say he had a lot more hair---and a lot less stomach---in
those days :)

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-15 14:52:29 UTC
Permalink
We heard "4 X 11 = 44" by one of New Orleans finest vocal groups of the 50s, Bobby Mitchell and the Toppers. They came in at #81 on this list, and the listing includes Bobby Mitchell's solo records. He had a hit in 1956 (Try Rock And Roll) and also did the original version of "I'm Gonna Be A Wheel Someday" in 1957, a song that Fats Domino had a huge hit with a couple of years after that. The Toppers had a very raw sound on things like "One Friday Morning" and "Sister Lucy" and "Rack 'em Back" and other items that they did for Lew Chudd's Imperial label.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:


81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we break into the top 80 with the original version of a song that was redone many times after this:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-16 02:06:32 UTC
Permalink
We heard the original version of "Seventh Son," a 1955 release from the #80 act on my list, Willie Mabon. Willie burst on to the scene late in 1952 when his "I Don't Know" was a sensation in the black community, shooting right to #1 on the R&B chart and staying there for 8 weeks. That classic record spawned several answer records from other acts and then Willie himself followed it up with another killer record called "Im Mad," which continued the story he was telling in "I Don't Know." He continued to make excellent records for Chess for the next few years. "I Don't Know" was done by John Belushi on the Blues Brothers #1 album "Briefcase Full of Vlues" in 1978. Mabon went on to make a bunch of good blues records on various Chicago labels in the 1960s, several of them sounding very similar to his 50s hits.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Now we get to the #79 act on the list, a legendary vocalist:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-16 15:25:31 UTC
Permalink
We just heard "Suffering With The Blues," a 1956 release from the #79 act on the list, Little Willie John. After an early Christmas record on an odd label Willie did all of his recording for King Records. He first hit it big with his 1955 cover of Titus Turner's "All Around The World." Soon after came his two most acclaimed songs; "Need Your Love So Bad" and "Fever." He went on to place a total of 14 songs on Billboard's Pop singles chart through 1961. A favorite of many other singers, James Brown even did a tribute album to him. Unfortunately his life took a turn for the worse in the mid-1960s and he ended up dying in prison in 1968.

Loading Image...

Little Willie John received 52 points in my tabulation. Here's how it broke down:

INCREDIBLY AWESOME (10 points)
All Around The World
Fever

GREAT (6 points)
I've Been Around

EXCELLENT (4 points)
Home At Last
Need Your Love So Bad
I'm Sticking With You Baby

VERY GOOD (2 points)
Are You Ever Coming Back
Letter From My Darling
My Nerves
Suffering With The Blues
There is Someone in This World For Me

GOOD (1 point)
Do Something For Me
You Got To Get Up Early in The Morning
Talk To Me, Talk To Me
Tell It Like It Is


A recap of the countdown so far:

79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we move up to the #78 act on the list, it's an R&B vocal group from the midwest that specialized in covers. Here is their best known record:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-17 02:25:05 UTC
Permalink
Otis Williams and the Charms are act #78 on the list and you heard their most famous record "Hearts Of Stone." The Charms covered a lot of records for the De Luxe label in the 50s. They covered hits by black groups like the Jewels, the 5 Keys and the Robins and white groups like the Cheers and the Crescendos. They even covered a few country hits and also pop hits like "Ivory Tower" by Cathy Carr. In between they also did many songs of their own. Add it all up and they had a lot of good records between 1953 and 1958 or so. Otis Williams was the lead singer and the youngest member of the group, and no relation to the singer of the same name in the Temptations.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And at #77 we have another R&B vocal group, and like many of the other groups of the day they were named after a type of bird:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-17 14:22:15 UTC
Permalink
We heard "Come Back My Love" from the #77 act on the list, The Cardinals. This great vocal group recorded for Ahmet Ertegun's Atlantic Record Label. They were on the R&B charts already in 1951 with a classic ballad called "Shouldn't I Know" and went on to make a slew of really good records throughout the decade. Other highlights include "The Door Is Still Open" in 1955 and an R&B take on "Wheel Of Fortune" in 1952. Ernie Lee Warren was their lead singer.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:


77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And as we move up to the #76 act on the list I am bringing in Alan Freed to introduce the song that represents this act. This comes from an aircheck of one of Freed's "Top 25" countdowns, from January or February of 1955. Every week Freed would count down the "Top 25 Rock 'n' Roll Songs" on his radio show on WINS in New York City. This record was #23 on his survey this week:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-18 02:23:15 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from the #76 act on the list, Pee Wee Crayton and his 1954 record "I Need Your Love." Pee Wee was a great guitarist and the Beatles even "borrowed" a riff from him that they used to open their song "Revolution."



Crayton had some big hits already in the late 1940s and in the 50s he recorded mainly for Imperial but also for Vee Jay and some other labels. My favorite by him is a record called "Yours Truly" from 1955 but that one was not on youtube.

Loading Image...

We are now one quarter of the way through the top 100.

A recap of the countdown so far:

76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Now let's break into the top 75 with a very influential act that unfortunately was the first major tragic death in rock and roll history:


Roger Ford
2013-10-18 12:32:08 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 17 Oct 2013 19:23:15 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
We just heard from the #76 act on the list, Pee Wee Crayton and his 1954 record "I Need Your Love." Pee Wee was a great guitarist and the Beatles even "borrowed" a riff from him that they used to open their song "Revolution."
http://youtu.be/_Dfh9QIjR3Q
Crayton had some big hits already in the late 1940s and in the 50s he recorded mainly for Imperial but also for Vee Jay and some other labels. My favorite by him is a record called "Yours Truly" from 1955 but that one was not on youtube.
"Yours Truly" is a favorite by him of mine too and its now on YouTube



(That is,the YouTube thought police in the USA permitting)

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-18 14:16:39 UTC
Permalink
"Yours Truly" is a favorite by him of mine too and its now on YouTube http://youtu.be/uXtRakajALM (That is,the YouTube thought police in the USA permitting)
It's blocked.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-18 14:57:45 UTC
Permalink
We heard from the #75 act on the list, John Marshall Alexander, better known as Johnny Ace, with his 1953 blockbuster "The Clock." Rarely did an act leave such a lasting legacy in such a short career. Johnny killed himself while playing Russian Roulette backstage around Christmas of 1954, just as he was starting to cross over as a mainstream act. He was only 25 years old. His songs (My Song, Pledging My Love. Never Let Me Go,) have been redone by some of the greatest acts of the rock era (Aretha Franklin, Elvis, the Impressions) and his influence is massive. Other than an early track he did for Flair (that wasn't released until after he had hits), Johnny spent his entire career recording for Don Robey's Duke label out of Houston. His famous "Memorial album" was a big seller for decades after his death.

Here's a later pressing from the 1970s or so, as the album remained in print for many years:

Loading Image...

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Time for the #74 act. If you like the sound of vocal group harmony at all the record that I am featuring to represent this act is one of the finest examples of the best of vocal group harmony in the 1950s. If it doesn't send a chill up your spine you better go have your pulse checked and see if you are dead:


Roger Ford
2013-10-18 15:21:03 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 07:16:39 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
"Yours Truly" is a favorite by him of mine too and its now on YouTube http://youtu.be/uXtRakajALM (That is,the YouTube thought police in the USA permitting)
It's blocked.
They really seem to be on the ball in the USA these days


ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-18 16:06:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
They really seem to be on the ball in the USA these days
They have to protect those big revenue generating masters like "Yours Truly."
Roger Ford
2013-10-18 18:18:17 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 18 Oct 2013 09:06:21 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Roger Ford
They really seem to be on the ball in the USA these days
They have to protect those big revenue generating masters like "Yours Truly."


How about now?


ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-18 18:26:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
How about now?
Still blocked.

This video contains content from EMI Music Publishing and EMI, one or more of whom have blocked it in your country on copyright grounds.

Sorry about that.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-19 03:20:24 UTC
Permalink
We heard "Your Way" a 1956 record from the #74 act on the list, the Heartbeats featuring their stupendous lead singer James "Shep" Sheppard. The group hailed from Queens, NY and they made several of the finest group harmony records of the 50s. The songs were usually written by Shep and many of them told a continuing story of a man and a woman, a story that continued into the 60s when Shep fronted a new group, Shep and the Limelites. Their best known record as the Heartbeats was "A Thousand Miles Away" but other classics included "Crazy For You" and "Darling How Long." They recorded mainly for George Goldner's Rama and Gee labels but also had records on a couple of Philadelphia labels, Network and Guyden.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we move on up to act #73 on the list, it's another vocal group, this time the most popular vocal group of the 1950s:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-19 14:41:55 UTC
Permalink
We just heard from the #73 act on the list, the Platters, and their 1956 record "You'll Never Never Know." The record featured their bass singer Herb Reed and their fabulous lead singer Tony Williams. The Platters were international stars in the 50s thanks to records like "Only You" and "The Great Pretender" and "My Prayer." They were equally comfortable doing doo wop as well as pop, having started out as more of an R&B group in their early days while recording for Federal Records. Tony Williams was a special singer who could easily have done opera, and he was singing opera when he first auditioned for a record deal in the early 50s. The group was popular with adults as well as teenagers and had some of the biggest hits of the decade with remakes of old standards like "Twilight Time" and "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes."

http://civilwartalk.com/attachments/platters-jpg.4971/


A recap of the countdown so far:


73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we move along now ironically this next act had a lot to do with the Platters making it big. Both acts had the same manager and when this act had a smash hit record early in 1955 Mercury wanted to sign them. Their manager, Buck Ram, would not let Mercury have this act unless they also signed the Platters, who they did not really want based on the lack of sales of their early records. But Ram insisted so Mercury reluctantly took the Platters too. As it turned out this act never sold many records for Mercury but the Platters became their biggest act of the 1955-1959 period. Here's the #72 act on the list with the B side of their most famous record:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-20 02:34:14 UTC
Permalink
The #72 act on the list is the Penguins and we heard "Hey Senorita" which was a popular song on the flip side of their legendary hit "Earth Angel." The record was released on Dootsie Williams' Dootone label in October of 1954. The group was from Los Angeles and they released several other real good records for Dootone before they switched over to Mercury. They also did some good sides for Mercury, and even had a hit record for Atlantic along the way. Cleve Duncan was the lead singer with the golden voice that helped make "Earth Angel" one of the most memorable records of the era. They also had a good record in the 1960s (Memories of El Monte) that was written by a young Frank Zappa.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we move now to the #71 act on the list, it's another star who died tragically in the 1950s. He actually died 4 days after Buddy Holly in 1959:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-20 14:41:17 UTC
Permalink
We heard from the #71 act on the list, Eddie Jones, who was better known as Guitar Slim. Despite what the video says (I'm Guitar Slim) the song we heard is simply called "Guitar Slim." It was an unissued track from 1954 that was eventually issued on an album in 1970. Slim was a rock star before there even was such a thing. Traveling around with a huge entouroge of "Shaker Girls" and hookers and hangers on, he was like the Pied Piper back in 1954. He was riding high on the heels of one of the biggest R&B hits of the decade, his classic "The Things That I Used To Do." Slim was a big influence on Ray Charles, who was in New Orleans at that time and played on the record. Ray also recorded a version of Slim's "Feelin' Sad" and was said to have been very taken with Slim's entire way.
Slim recorded for several labels in the 50s, but most notably for Art Rupe's Specialty label. He died of Pneumonia at the age of 31 in 1959.

Loading Image...

A recap of the countdown so far:

71 - Guitar Slim
72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

As we break into the top 70 now, we will hear from a Texas blueman who dubbed himself "Mr. Magnificent."


Frank
2013-10-20 22:26:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
We just heard from the #73 act on the list, the Platters, and their 1956 record "You'll Never Never Know." The record featured their bass singer Herb Reed and their fabulous lead singer Tony Williams. The Platters were international stars in the 50s thanks to records like "Only You" and "The Great Pretender" and "My Prayer." They were equally comfortable doing doo wop as well as pop, having started out as more of an R&B group in their early days while recording for Federal Records. Tony Williams was a special singer who could easily have done opera, and he was singing opera when he first auditioned for a record deal in the early 50s. The group was popular with adults as well as teenagers and had some of the biggest hits of the decade with remakes of old standards like "Twilight Time" and "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes."
http://civilwartalk.com/attachments/platters-jpg.4971/
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King
http://youtu.be/MCkC2kg2KlQ
Fortunately, someone I must have known discovered the "B" side early on and it got lots of play at parties. Is that the original label?
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-20 22:47:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank
Fortunately, someone I must have known discovered the "B" side early on and it got lots of play at parties. Is that the original label?
No, this is, the maroon copy:

Loading Image...
Frank
2013-10-20 23:42:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Frank
Fortunately, someone I must have known discovered the "B" side early on and it got lots of play at parties. Is that the original label?
http://i.ebayimg.com/t/THE-PENGUINS-Hey-Senorita-45-Earth-Angel-Dootone-records-348-Curtis-Williams-7-/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/$T2eC16dHJG!E9nm3rIkVBP+QfZD0J!~~60_35.JPG
Thanks. That's the one I remember, but then questioned myself when I watched the video. "Hey Senorita" was also played at college dances, since the Slop was a big dance favorite in Toledo c. 62-63 and HS fit the bill nicely.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-21 03:00:05 UTC
Permalink
We just heard "Please Don't Go," a 1953 track from act #70 on my list, Floyd Dixon. He's also one of Poisoned Rose's favorites. Floyd had 5 national R&B chart hits in the late 40s and early 50s, but is probably best known today for doing the original version of "Hey Bartender" in 1955. The song was later done by the Blues Brothers and was also a huge country hit by Johnny Lee in the 1980s. Floyd recorded for several labels in the 50s, including Specialty, Cat, Peacock and Aladdin. Cat was an Atlantic subsidiary, the label that "Sh-Boom" by the Chords was on.

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

70 - Floyd Dixon
71 - Guitar Slim
72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

And now we move down to act #69, the first rock and roll vocal group:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-21 14:59:27 UTC
Permalink
The Ravens came in as the #69 act on my list. We heard their fabulous rendition of "Count Every Star," from 1950. The group had their first records released in 1946 and were big stars by the end of the 1940s. The highlight of the group was their superstar bass singer Jimmy Ricks, who sang lead on many of their records, but the lead tenor Maithe Marshall was also tremendous. Marshall was repaced by Joe Van Loan in 1951. In the 50s they recorded for Columbia, Okeh, Mercury, Jubilee, Argo and other labels. Some of their best 1950s records were "Going Home" and "A Simple Prayer" and "Green Eyes," a revival of the classic 1940s hit from Jimmy Dorsey. In 1948 they released their jazzed up version of "White Christmas," which became a big hit and was later redone by the Drifters, using the same arrangement, and that version became a bigger hit. Who knows, we could be hearing from the Drifters somewhere along the way in this countdown :-)

Loading Image...


A recap of the countdown so far:

69 - The Ravens
70 - Floyd Dixon
71 - Guitar Slim
72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King


As we move up the list now to act #68, we hear from a former boxer who had 107 bouts in his pugilistic career.


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-22 01:39:02 UTC
Permalink
The record was "Shim Sham Shimmy, on Bobby Robinson's Red Robin label out of Harlem, and it came from the #68 act on the list, Champion Jack Dupree. Jack was born sometime between 1908 and 1910 and he lived a very interesting life.
His father was from the Belgian Congo and his mother was part African American and Cherokee. He was orphaned at the age of two, and sent to the New Orleans Home for Colored Waifs (also the alma mater of Louis Armstrong).

He taught himself piano there and later apprenticed with Tuts Washington and Willie Hall, whom he called his 'father' and from whom he learned "Junker's Blues". He was also "spy boy" for the Yellow Pochahantas tribe of Mardi Gras Indians and soon began playing in barrelhouses and other drinking establishments.

He began a life of traveling, living in Chicago, where he worked with Georgia Tom, and in Indianapolis, Indiana where he met Scrapper Blackwell and Leroy Carr. While always playing piano he also worked as a cook. In Detroit, after Joe Louis encouraged him to become a boxer, he fought in 107 bouts, winning Golden Gloves and other championships and picking up the nickname 'Champion Jack', which he used the rest of his life.

He returned to Chicago at the age of 30 and joined a circle of recording artists, including Big Bill Broonzy and Tampa Red, who introduced him to the record producer Lester Melrose, who claimed composer credit and publishing on many of Dupree's songs. Dupree's career was interrupted by military service in World War II. He was a cook in the United States Navy and spent two years as a Japanese prisoner of war.

In the 1950s he recorded for several labels including King, Red Robin and Atlantic. His King version of "Rub A Little Boogie" is among my 10 favorite records of all time.

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRbC6jC9bWfdisUDwKsIsPF7rZexb1j9ql56vn3niiuKRKNr4nO


68 - Champion Jack Dupree
69 - The Ravens
70 - Floyd Dixon
71 - Guitar Slim
72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Next up the #67 act on the list, an incredibly powerful female vocalist:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-22 14:58:35 UTC
Permalink
Act #67 was Big Maybelle and we heard "One Monkey Don't Stop No Show" from 1955. Big Maybelle had several big R&B chart hits in the 50s (Way Back Home, Gabbin' Blues, I've Got A Feeling, Candy) for labels like Okeh and Savoy. If you haven't heard of her it's difficult to desribe how great she was with words, but here is an excerpt from an interview with Betty LaVette from a few years ago......

Q. What do you think of the state of R&B these days? Are there any singers you like?

A. There aren’t any R&B singers. I feel so bad about the title R&B because now they’ve made anything that’s black R&B, and that’s just not true. I think these lovely young ladies, Beyoncé, and, what’s the cute little girl’s name, Alicia Keys — all of them should be pop singers. They aren’t rhythm and blues singers. If they were standing on a stage next to Big Maybelle, like I was, they’d be blown off the stage.

As I mentioned earlier in the countdown, Big Maybelle did the original version of "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On." There's a great scene in the movie "Great Balls Of Fire" where a young Jerry Lee Lewis sneaks over to the black club on the other side of town and spies Big Maybelle singing that song. Her version of "Candy" was featured on an episode of the Cosby Show.

Loading Image...

Loading Image...


A recap of the list so far:

67 - Big Maybelle
68 - Champion Jack Dupree
69 - The Ravens
70 - Floyd Dixon
71 - Guitar Slim
72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

At #66 now is a legendary act that should be known to everybody:


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-23 03:17:00 UTC
Permalink
We heard from act #66 on the countdown, the Everly Brothers. The selection was "I Wonder If I Care As Much," the flip side of their 1957 blockbuster "Bye Bye Love." Phil and Don Everly were singing already as young kids as part of a family act with their parents. Doing strictly country music until they signed with Archie Bleyer's Cadence label in 1957 and became rock and rollers. They shot to stardom right away and ended up being among the first 10 acts inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Famous for their mesmerizing two part harmony they also were very influential on 1960s rock and roll acts like the Beatles and Simon and Garfunkel, who tried to emulate those harmonies.

You would think that this act would have been higher on my list, but the facts are that the Everly Brothers just did not release all that many tracks in the 1950s. They only had 6 songs released by the end of 1957 and ended up with a lot of releases in 1958 and 1959, but they still only totaled around 40 tracks for the 1950s, including two early unissued country tracks that they did for Columbia. This total also included an album called "Songs Our Daddy Taught Us" which included all old time country songs that they had learned growing up. They did continue to make good records in the 1960s and will surely be on my 1960s list when I get to that.

Loading Image...


The Everly Brothers scored 63 points in my tabulation, which breaks down like this:

INCREDIBLY AWESOME (10 points)
Bye Bye Love

GREAT (6 points)
Wake Up Little Susie
Should We Tell Him
('Til) I Kissed You

EXCELLENT (4 points)
I Wonder If I Care As Much
Bird Dog
This Little Girl of Mine

VERY GOOD (2 points)
Keep A' Loving Me
The Sun Keeps Shining
All I Have To Do Is Dream
Be-Bop-A-Lula
Brand New Heartache
Claudette
Devoted To You
Problems

GOOD (1 point)
That's The Life I Have To Live
Maybe Tomorrow
Hey Doll Baby
I'm Hear To Get My Baby Out of Jail
Rip It Up
Let It Be Me
Poor Jenny


A recap of the list so far:

66 - The Everly Brothers
67 - Big Maybelle
68 - Champion Jack Dupree
69 - The Ravens
70 - Floyd Dixon
71 - Guitar Slim
72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King


Which brings us now to the #65 act on the list, this act is primarilly known for big country hits but he's on my list mainly for his rockabilly material.


The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-23 14:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Marty Robbins was #65 on the countdown and from 1955 we heard "Pretty Mama," one of his great rockabilly tracks. Marty had a bigger hit than Elvis with his version of "That's All Right" and also did other succesful covers of rock and roll records like "Maybellene" and "Long Tall Sally." Others rockers like "Tennessee Toddy" and "Mean Mama Blues" were also excellent. He had the original version of "Singing The Blues" which was a big country chart hit for him and the song became one of the biggest overall records of the decade as done by Guy Mitchell.

Robbins then changed his sound to country with a pop edge to it and had his biggest record to date in 1957 with "A White Sport Coat." He ended the decade with the release of his best known single (El Paso) and the album that it was on (Gunfighter Ballads).

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A recap of the list so far:

65 - Marty Robbins
66 - The Everly Brothers
67 - Big Maybelle
68 - Champion Jack Dupree
69 - The Ravens
70 - Floyd Dixon
71 - Guitar Slim
72 - The Penguins
73 - The Platters
74 - The Heartbeats
75 - Johnny Ace
76 - Pee Wee Crayton
77 - The Cardinals
78 - Otis Williams and The Charms
79 - Little Willie John
80 - Willie Mabon
81 - Bobby Mitchell & the Toppers
82 - The Flairs
83 - Charlie Feathers
84 - Mac Curtis
85 - Nolan Strong and the Diablos
86 - Jesse Belvin
87 - Dale Hawkins
88 - Boyd Bennett and His Rockets
89 - The Solitaires
90 - The Dells
91 - Wanda Jackson
92 - Professor Longhair
93 - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson
94 - Little Jr. Parker
95 - Ricky Nelson
96 - Ivory Joe Hunter
97 - Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers
98 - Roy Milton
99 - LaVern Baker
100 - Roy Orbison
------------------------------------
101 - Roy Hall
102 - Richard Berry
103 - James "Sugarboy" Crawford
104 - Lula Reed
105 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton
106 - The Larks
107 - The Hollywood Flames
108 - The Jewels
109 - Brownie McGhee
110 - Earl King

Let's move up now to the #64 act. One of the "funkiest" sounding R&B acts of the decade is here with his biggest hit:


Roger Ford
2013-10-23 16:42:07 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Oct 2013 07:46:54 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Marty Robbins was #65 on the countdown and from 1955 we heard "Pretty Mama,=
" one of his great rockabilly tracks. Marty had a bigger hit than Elvis wit=
h his version of "That's All Right" and also did other succesful covers of =
rock and roll records like "Maybellene" and "Long Tall Sally." Others rocke=
rs like "Tennessee Toddy" and "Mean Mama Blues" were also excellent. He had=
the original version of "Singing The Blues" which was a big country chart =
hit for him and the song became one of the biggest overall records of the d=
ecade as done by Guy Mitchell.=20
I believe there was an earlier demo version of "Singing The Blues"
recorded by Melvin Endsley which has never surfaced. However Robbins
certainly had the first released version.


ROGER FORD
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The Bloomfield Buddy
2013-10-23 16:56:45 UTC
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I believe there was an earlier demo version of "Singing The Blues" recorded by Melvin Endsley which has never surfaced.
Demos are not being counted as being the original version of a song by anybody who keeps track of such things. If they were than many originals as we know them would change, like "Heartbreak Hotel" for instance.



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