Discussion:
How to make individual track audio files from one album audio file
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RWC
2018-10-27 07:52:31 UTC
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There are apps that will do this by first finding the brief period of silence
between tracks.

Below I explain how to use two such apps; the first is 'menu driven' and
involves multiple steps, the other is DOS-like 'command line' driven but is just
one step.

Let's say you're interested in Leo Schifrin's jazzy soundtrack to "Gone With The
Wave" - a longboard surfing movie-documentary from 1964.

The entire soundtrack can be heard here (as one continuous audio stream - ie
it's not a collection of individual track 'video' postings):


8 of the 11 tracks *can* actually be found as individual posts, but not the
remaining 3. So, you decide to download the above YouTube link, converting the
one 'long' video to one audio file, and split this single audio file into
separate mp3 or flac files for each track:

*** App #1 - the more user-friendly app perhaps (because it uses menus) although
the process does involve decoding your original audio file and then re-encoding
to produce a separate audio file for each track (which *might* slightly affect
the resulting sound quality).

This is the famous and free, digital sound editing app, "Audacity"
https://www.fosshub.com/Audacity.html

Start the Audacity app.
File > Import > Audio > browse to your 'album' audio file > Open

you should immediately notice distinct gaps in the sound wave displayed (10, in
the case of "Gone With The Wave")

Edit > Clip Boundaries > Detach At Boundaries

For each sound wave section:
1. double-left-click within the section to select it
2. press Ctrl+B to enable a label to be assigned to that section
Optionally:
3. left-click within the small upright white box at bottom of section
4. type in or paste a label name - eg the song title or artist-song for that
track/section (of course, you can go to the target folder later and edit these
labels/filenames further). If you don't name a label, the track filename will
default to "untitled".

File>Export>Export Multiple
. if the displayed target folder is not where you want the tracks to go, then
use the Choose button to browse to the desired folder (or type in a new folder
and click the Create button)
. under Name files: decide whether you want to prefix each label with a
sequential track number (good idea perhaps if you haven't named the labels)

Click on Export
. a *metadata* (ID3 and all that) editor will appear for the first song. The
Track Title and Track Number will be pre-filled from your labels, but you can
enter any additional information for that song that you wish
. click the OK button (not the Save or Add button) to go on to the next track

When you click "OK" on the window for the last song, all the tracks will export,
one after the other.

*** App #2 - involves going into your computer's (DOS-like) 'command' mode and
entering just one line of instruction (simple really, but perhaps for some, not
as 'friendly' as using a menu).

This is "mp3splt", a free utility to split mp3 and flac files *without decoding*
- it just chops up the original audio file, so to speak, using silence detection
(or other info).
http://mp3splt.sourceforge.net/mp3splt_page/home.php
to install: left-click on the blue Download label, then left-click on
"installer.exe" in the Windows section
(by default the app is placed in folder C:\Program Files\mp3splt)

the app has many command line options/switches, but keeping things basic you
only need to enter:

mp3splt -s -d "output path for individual tracks" "path & filename of original
audio/album file"

Note, you need the quotes if there are any spaces in a path name, and you can
paste a path and filename into the command line by right-clicking your mouse
within the black (or whatever) command dialog box and choosing Paste (and, btw,
F3 will re-type the previous command...).

Here is an an actual command line that works (up to > is just the prompt):

C:\Program Files\mp3splt>mp3splt -s -d C:\Mp3s\New "G:\Mp3s\Gone With The Wav
e (1964) Soundtrack - Lalo Schifrin.mp3"

The individual track mp3s will, by default, be named the same as the original
'album' mp3 but with an added _sequential number suffix. You can then go to the
target folder and change these filenames to "artist { -track} - song..." or
whatever.


Geoff
Mr. M
2018-10-27 08:16:31 UTC
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Post by RWC
This is the famous and free, digital sound editing app, "Audacity"
https://www.fosshub.com/Audacity.html
Start the Audacity app.
File > Import > Audio > browse to your 'album' audio file > Open
you should immediately notice distinct gaps in the sound wave displayed (10, in
the case of "Gone With The Wave")
Edit > Clip Boundaries > Detach At Boundaries
1. double-left-click within the section to select it
2. press Ctrl+B to enable a label to be assigned to that section
3. left-click within the small upright white box at bottom of section
4. type in or paste a label name - eg the song title or artist-song for that
track/section (of course, you can go to the target folder later and edit these
labels/filenames further). If you don't name a label, the track filename will
default to "untitled".
File>Export>Export Multiple
. if the displayed target folder is not where you want the tracks to go, then
use the Choose button to browse to the desired folder (or type in a new folder
and click the Create button)
. under Name files: decide whether you want to prefix each label with a
sequential track number (good idea perhaps if you haven't named the labels)
I use this to record a string of 45s. I record a few as one long wave
and then put the label in for each song. I also ediit the beginning
and end of each song. It may not always be advisible to have the
program find the gaps automatically if there are silent passages in a
song. Sometimes this can really bog the computer down and it's better
to just record each 45 by itself. I usually have to re-boot the
computer and unplug the modem for this to work good.

Mr. M
RWC
2018-10-27 14:38:48 UTC
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On Sat, 27 Oct 2018 04:16:31 -0400, Mr. M <***@gmail.com> wrote:
(btw, I made a typo, it should be
Edit > Clip Boundaries > Detach At *Silences*)
It may not always be advisible to have the program find the gaps
automatically if there are silent passages in a song.
True, but a 'false' track boundary can be removed before labeling:
With the left mouse button, click and 'scrape across' an area of the sound wave
that straddles the boundary, then press Ctrl+J (or Edit > Clip Boundaries >
Join) to remove the boundary.
DianeE
2018-10-29 12:10:27 UTC
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Permalink
Post by RWC
(btw, I made a typo, it should be
Edit > Clip Boundaries > Detach At *Silences*)
It may not always be advisible to have the program find the gaps
automatically if there are silent passages in a song.
With the left mouse button, click and 'scrape across' an area of the sound wave
that straddles the boundary, then press Ctrl+J (or Edit > Clip Boundaries >
Join) to remove the boundary.
---------
Audacity is one of the most useful apps/programs ever. Personally, when
dividing a full-album mp3 into individual tracks I do it visually, then
start playback a few seconds before the silence just to make sure it's
actually the end of the track.
As Martin said it's also great for doing the reverse process, creating a
medley for example.
My only problem with Audacity is that it doesn't work with .flac
(lossless) files. Yet.
Ken Whiton
2018-10-29 19:36:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
*-* On Mon, 29 Oct 2018, at 08:10:27 -0400,
*-* In Article <-7KdnVqiid4gZUvGnZ2dnUU7-***@giganews.com>,
*-* DianeE wrote
*-* About Re: How to make individual track audio files from one album
audio file

[ ... ]
Post by DianeE
My only problem with Audacity is that it doesn't work with .flac
(lossless) files. Yet.
It should. According to our e-mails exchange about a year and a
half ago I'm using a slightly older version of Audacity than the one
you downloaded at that time, and both the Open/Import and Export Audio
dialogs in mine list .flac as a supported file type. I don't have any
.flac files available to test it with however. The older version you
had previously used didn't support .flac. Is it possible that you're
still thinking in terms of that older version, and haven't actually
tried it in the newer version?

Ken Whiton
--
FIDO: 1:132/152
InterNet: ***@surfglobal.net.INVAL (remove the obvious to reply)
Mr. M
2018-10-29 20:06:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 29 Oct 2018 15:36:47 -0400, Ken Whiton
Post by Ken Whiton
*-* On Mon, 29 Oct 2018, at 08:10:27 -0400,
*-* About Re: How to make individual track audio files from one album
audio file
[ ... ]
Post by DianeE
My only problem with Audacity is that it doesn't work with .flac
(lossless) files. Yet.
It should. According to our e-mails exchange about a year and a
half ago I'm using a slightly older version of Audacity than the one
you downloaded at that time, and both the Open/Import and Export Audio
dialogs in mine list .flac as a supported file type. I don't have any
.flac files available to test it with however. The older version you
had previously used didn't support .flac. Is it possible that you're
still thinking in terms of that older version, and haven't actually
tried it in the newer version?
Ken Whiton
I use an older edition of Audacity and I have recorded loads of flacs
with it, posted a lot of them also. I think it was Cool Edit that
didn't support flac.

Mr. M
Ken Whiton
2018-10-31 08:22:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
*-* On Mon, 29 Oct 2018, at 16:06:58 -0400,
*-* In Article <***@4ax.com>,
*-* Mr. M wrote
*-* About Re: How to make individual track audio files from one album
audio file
Post by Mr. M
On Mon, 29 Oct 2018 15:36:47 -0400, Ken Whiton
Post by Ken Whiton
[ ... ]
Post by DianeE
My only problem with Audacity is that it doesn't work with .flac
(lossless) files. Yet.
[ ... ]
Post by Mr. M
Post by Ken Whiton
The older version you had previously used didn't support .flac. Is
it possible that you're still thinking in terms of that older
version, and haven't actually tried it in the newer version?
I use an older edition of Audacity and I have recorded loads of
flacs with it, posted a lot of them also. I think it was Cool Edit
that didn't support flac.
Early versions of Audacity didn't support .flac. According to
comments in the Audacity forums .flac support was added in version
1.3.

<https://forum.audacityteam.org/search.php?st=0&sk=t&sd=a&sr=posts&sid=4ecf9b330f34419bfb374dabde2d66a7&keywords=flac+support>
(or <https://preview.tinyurl.com/y9ttsf3a>)

Diane's older version that I referred to was version 1.2.4.

Ken Whiton
--
FIDO: 1:132/152
InterNet: ***@surfglobal.net.INVAL (remove the obvious to reply)
DianeE
2018-10-31 04:25:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Whiton
*-* On Mon, 29 Oct 2018, at 08:10:27 -0400,
*-* About Re: How to make individual track audio files from one album
audio file
          [ ... ]
Post by DianeE
My only problem with Audacity is that it doesn't work with .flac
(lossless) files.  Yet.
     It should.  According to our e-mails exchange about a year and a
half ago I'm using a slightly older version of Audacity than the one
you downloaded at that time, and both the Open/Import and Export Audio
dialogs in mine list .flac as a supported file type.  I don't have any
.flac files available to test it with however.  The older version you
had previously used didn't support .flac.  Is it possible that you're
still thinking in terms of that older version, and haven't actually
tried it in the newer version?
                                        Ken Whiton
--------------
You're right. I just used it on a .flac file and was able to amplify
it, trim a few dead seconds off the end, and fix the tag. What I wasn't
able to do was change it from stereo (redundant, the 2 tracks are
identical) to mono.
Jim Colegrove
2018-10-30 00:08:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DianeE
Post by RWC
(btw, I made a typo, it should be
Edit > Clip Boundaries > Detach At *Silences*)
It may not always be advisible to have the program find the gaps
automatically if there are silent passages in a song.
With the left mouse button, click and 'scrape across' an area of the sound wave
that straddles the boundary, then press Ctrl+J (or Edit > Clip Boundaries >
Join) to remove the boundary.
---------
Audacity is one of the most useful apps/programs ever. Personally, when
dividing a full-album mp3 into individual tracks I do it visually, then
start playback a few seconds before the silence just to make sure it's
actually the end of the track.
As Martin said it's also great for doing the reverse process, creating a
medley for example.
My only problem with Audacity is that it doesn't work with .flac
(lossless) files. Yet.
Audacity Ver 2.1.3 supports .flac. I can covert to it and play it.
RWC
2018-10-30 06:08:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DianeE
Audacity is one of the most useful apps/programs ever. Personally, when
dividing a full-album mp3 into individual tracks I do it visually, then
start playback a few seconds before the silence just to make sure it's
actually the end of the track.
For anyone interested, the following steps are one way to *visually* divide the
album (or, as not infrequently seen/heard on YouTube, the two sides of a
single).

After you've opened the album mp3 in Audacity:

. first, to make the 'silence between tracks' wider (to ease visual marking)
Zoom In the sound wave once or twice, by clicking on the small 'magnify plus'
icon above the soundwave (or press Ctrl+1).

. place the mouse cursor within a track gap (a relatively wide flat-line part of
the soundwave), left-click and press Ctrl+B (= Edit > Labels > Add
Label At Selection) - this starts a label track beneath the sound track(s);
repeat for each track gap, using (if you have zoomed) the horizontal
scroll bar beneath the tracks. You also need to add a label boundary at
the start of the soundwave.

. you can now Zoom Out to do away with the need for horizontal scrolling - press
Ctrl+F to Fit Project To Width.

. check that the number of label regions matches the number of 'album' tracks

. optionally, to make sure it really is the end of a track, you can listen to
the audio by left-clicking just above the sound track - to stop playback,
just press the X key, or the <space> key to return the cursor to your
starting point.

. now add label descriptions: Edit > Labels > Edit Labels
This brings up a dialog box allowing you to enter label/track descriptions
(eg artist - song) - the Label column can be widened, by the way.
When you've finished entering Label names, click OK to transfer these names to
the Label Track.

. as previously described, go from:
File>Export>Export Multiple
...


Geoff
DianeE
2018-10-29 12:12:49 UTC
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Permalink
....Let's say you're interested in Leo Schifrin's jazzy soundtrack to "Gone With The
Wave" - a longboard surfing movie-documentary from 1964....
--------------
Is that Lalo Schifrin's brother?
RWC
2018-10-30 00:28:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DianeE
....Let's say you're interested in Leo Schifrin's jazzy soundtrack to "Gone With The
Wave" - a longboard surfing movie-documentary from 1964....
--------------
Is that Lalo Schifrin's brother?
No, it was my impromptu nickname for Argentinian born American pianist Lalo (or
was I conflating his name with fellow star band member, reedman Leo Wright)? :-)

btw, a review of that short movie from http://dougpayne.com/ls_rev.htm

Gone With The Wave / October 1964 / Colpix
A terrific collection of catchy, upbeat jazz tunes accompanying a documentary
film on surfing. The magic is provided by 12 of LA's best studio jazz musicians
at their peak: including Paul Horn (as,f), Frank Rosolino (tb), Victor Feldman
(p), Shelly Manne (d) and Howard Roberts and Laurindo Almeida (g). Very, very
hard to find...but highly recommended. In 1965, Down Beat said that the album
"consists of brief pieces of currently fashionable atmosphere music, ground out
like neatly packaged sausages--bossa nova, funky waltz, blues, twist, etc. The
performances are capable but quite impersonal." I beg to differ: Schifrin is
masterful here.
Will Dockery
2018-11-07 19:21:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RWC
There are apps that will do this by first finding the brief period of silence
between tracks.

Below I explain how to use two such apps; the first is 'menu driven' and
involves multiple steps, the other is DOS-like 'command line' driven but is
just
one step.

Let's say you're interested in Leo Schifrin's jazzy soundtrack to "Gone With
The
Wave" - a longboard surfing movie-documentary from 1964.

The entire soundtrack can be heard here (as one continuous audio stream - ie
it's not a collection of individual track 'video' postings):
http://youtu.be/ivVAHqI61pQ

8 of the 11 tracks *can* actually be found as individual posts, but not the
remaining 3. So, you decide to download the above YouTube link, converting
the
one 'long' video to one audio file, and split this single audio file into
separate mp3 or flac files for each track:

*** App #1 - the more user-friendly app perhaps (because it uses menus)
although
the process does involve decoding your original audio file and then
re-encoding
to produce a separate audio file for each track (which *might* slightly
affect
the resulting sound quality).

This is the famous and free, digital sound editing app, "Audacity"
https://www.fosshub.com/Audacity.html

Start the Audacity app.
File > Import > Audio > browse to your 'album' audio file > Open

you should immediately notice distinct gaps in the sound wave displayed (10,
in
the case of "Gone With The Wave")

Edit > Clip Boundaries > Detach At Boundaries

For each sound wave section:
1. double-left-click within the section to select it
2. press Ctrl+B to enable a label to be assigned to that section
Optionally:
3. left-click within the small upright white box at bottom of section
4. type in or paste a label name - eg the song title or artist-song for that
track/section (of course, you can go to the target folder later and edit
these
labels/filenames further). If you don't name a label, the track filename
will
default to "untitled".

File>Export>Export Multiple
. if the displayed target folder is not where you want the tracks to go,
then
use the Choose button to browse to the desired folder (or type in a new
folder
and click the Create button)
. under Name files: decide whether you want to prefix each label with a
sequential track number (good idea perhaps if you haven't named the labels)

Click on Export
. a *metadata* (ID3 and all that) editor will appear for the first song. The
Track Title and Track Number will be pre-filled from your labels, but you
can
enter any additional information for that song that you wish
. click the OK button (not the Save or Add button) to go on to the next
track

When you click "OK" on the window for the last song, all the tracks will
export,
one after the other.

*** App #2 - involves going into your computer's (DOS-like) 'command' mode
and
entering just one line of instruction (simple really, but perhaps for some,
not
as 'friendly' as using a menu).

This is "mp3splt", a free utility to split mp3 and flac files *without
decoding*
- it just chops up the original audio file, so to speak, using silence
detection
(or other info).
http://mp3splt.sourceforge.net/mp3splt_page/home.php
to install: left-click on the blue Download label, then left-click on
"installer.exe" in the Windows section
(by default the app is placed in folder C:\Program Files\mp3splt)

the app has many command line options/switches, but keeping things basic you
only need to enter:

mp3splt -s -d "output path for individual tracks" "path & filename of
original
audio/album file"

Note, you need the quotes if there are any spaces in a path name, and you
can
paste a path and filename into the command line by right-clicking your mouse
within the black (or whatever) command dialog box and choosing Paste (and,
btw,
F3 will re-type the previous command...).

Here is an an actual command line that works (up to > is just the prompt):

C:\Program Files\mp3splt>mp3splt -s -d C:\Mp3s\New "G:\Mp3s\Gone With The
Wav
e (1964) Soundtrack - Lalo Schifrin.mp3"

The individual track mp3s will, by default, be named the same as the
original
'album' mp3 but with an added _sequential number suffix. You can then go to
the
target folder and change these filenames to "artist { -track} - song..." or
whatever.
Post by RWC
Geoff
Thanks, saving this for later...

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