Discussion:
The Number Ones: Connie Francis’ “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool”
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Bob Roman
2018-11-28 19:47:00 UTC
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A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.

Connie Francis – “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool”
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks

We’ve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went country aren’t so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her fame, made the transition from pop to country — or a very pop version of country, anyway — and it proved to be a smart move.

Francis was an unlikely country star — an Italian kid from New Jersey who regularly cut records in German and Yiddish. (A polkafied German-language version of “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool” hit #1 in Germany.) Francis had made her name with down-the-middle late-’50s dance-party hits like “Stupid Cupid” and “Lipstick On Your Collar.”

“Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool” moved her gently away from sock-hop fare. It’s fast enough that it’s not quite a ballad and ruminative enough that it’s not quite a dance song. The organ on the intro sounds more like “Baby Elephant Walk” than like country music. The lyrics nod toward world-weary wisdom while Francis’ delivery sounds distinctly teenage. It’s all slightly awkward, but there’s a nice plaint in her voice, and it really sells the song.

GRADE: 5/10
SavoyBG
2018-11-28 20:13:59 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis – “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool”
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
We’ve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went country aren’t so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her fame, made the transition from pop to country — or a very pop version of country, anyway — and it proved to be a smart move.
Francis was an unlikely country star —
Connie was a country star like this clod is gonna win Novel Prizes for his (cough) writing.
SavoyBG
2018-11-28 20:16:30 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis – “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool”
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
We’ve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went country aren’t so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her fame, made the transition from pop to country — or a very pop version of country, anyway — and it proved to be a smart move.
Francis was an unlikely country star —
Connie was a country star like this clod is gonna win Novel Prizes for his (cough) writing.
I wish this forum allowed editing of posts like every other forum.

That's NOBEL prizes.
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-28 20:38:56 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis ­ ³Everybody¹s Somebody¹s Fool²
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
We¹ve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from
country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went
country aren¹t so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career
self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her
fame, made the transition from pop to country ‹ or a very pop version of
country, anyway ‹ and it proved to be a smart move.
Francis was an unlikely country star ‹ an Italian kid from New Jersey who
regularly cut records in German and Yiddish. (A polkafied German-language
version of ³Everybody¹s Somebody¹s Fool² hit #1 in Germany.) Francis had made
her name with down-the-middle late-¹50s dance-party hits like ³Stupid Cupid²
and ³Lipstick On Your Collar.²
³Everybody¹s Somebody¹s Fool² moved her gently away from sock-hop fare. It¹s
fast enough that it¹s not quite a ballad and ruminative enough that it¹s not
quite a dance song. The organ on the intro sounds more like ³Baby Elephant
Walk² than like country music. The lyrics nod toward world-weary wisdom while
Francis¹ delivery sounds distinctly teenage. It¹s all slightly awkward, but
there¹s a nice plaint in her voice, and it really sells the song.
GRADE: 5/10
He seems to have this muddled with an earlier song of the same title
that was a country hit for Little Jimmy Dickens. (If I have this wrong,
blame Wikipedia.) I never thought Connie's record as anything but
slightly rock-tinged pop--if I ever actually thought about it at all.
It was the sort of move towards pop that a lot of white artists who had
some early r'n'r hits were making at the time, and that led to
newspapers reporting rock was dead. They had, of course, said the same
thing earlier when the calypso craze went big with Belafonte and when
the Kingston Trio was leading a folkie march to the charts. In fact
r'n'r kept being reported dead all through the cusp years until Motown
and the Brits showed it was alive and thriving, and only the real 50s
aficionados now worried about its health.
--
--md
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SavoyBG
2018-11-28 20:48:09 UTC
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Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis ­ łEverybodyąs Somebodyąs Fool˛
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
Weąve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from
country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went
country arenąt so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career
self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her
fame, made the transition from pop to country ‹ or a very pop version of
country, anyway ‹ and it proved to be a smart move.
Francis was an unlikely country star ‹ an Italian kid from New Jersey who
regularly cut records in German and Yiddish. (A polkafied German-language
version of łEverybodyąs Somebodyąs Fool˛ hit #1 in Germany.) Francis had made
her name with down-the-middle late-ą50s dance-party hits like łStupid Cupid˛
and łLipstick On Your Collar.˛
łEverybodyąs Somebodyąs Fool˛ moved her gently away from sock-hop fare. Itąs
fast enough that itąs not quite a ballad and ruminative enough that itąs not
quite a dance song. The organ on the intro sounds more like łBaby Elephant
Walk˛ than like country music. The lyrics nod toward world-weary wisdom while
Francisą delivery sounds distinctly teenage. Itąs all slightly awkward, but
thereąs a nice plaint in her voice, and it really sells the song.
GRADE: 5/10
He seems to have this muddled with an earlier song of the same title
that was a country hit for Little Jimmy Dickens. (If I have this wrong,
blame Wikipedia.)
The Connie got into the 20s on the BB Country chart, but it's not like she started a slew of country hits or something.
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-28 22:17:00 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis - ?Everybody?s Somebody?s Foolœ
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
We?ve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from
country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went
country aren?t so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career
self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her
fame, made the transition from pop to country Ð or a very pop version of
country, anyway Ð and it proved to be a smart move.
Francis was an unlikely country star Ð an Italian kid from New Jersey who
regularly cut records in German and Yiddish. (A polkafied German-language
version of ?Everybody?s Somebody?s Foolœ hit #1 in Germany.) Francis had
made
her name with down-the-middle late-?50s dance-party hits like ?Stupid
Cupidœ
and ?Lipstick On Your Collar.œ
?Everybody?s Somebody?s Foolœ moved her gently away from sock-hop fare.
It?s
fast enough that it?s not quite a ballad and ruminative enough that it?s
not
quite a dance song. The organ on the intro sounds more like ?Baby Elephant
Walkœ than like country music. The lyrics nod toward world-weary wisdom
while
Francis? delivery sounds distinctly teenage. It?s all slightly awkward,
but
there?s a nice plaint in her voice, and it really sells the song.
GRADE: 5/10
He seems to have this muddled with an earlier song of the same title
that was a country hit for Little Jimmy Dickens. (If I have this wrong,
blame Wikipedia.)
The Connie got into the 20s on the BB Country chart, but it's not like she started a slew of country hits or something.
Wasn't this the period when the Billboard charts spilled into each
other in a big way?
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
SavoyBG
2018-11-28 22:22:09 UTC
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Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis - ?Everybody?s Somebody?s Foolœ
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
We?ve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from
country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went
country aren?t so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career
self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her
fame, made the transition from pop to country Ð or a very pop version of
country, anyway Ð and it proved to be a smart move.
Francis was an unlikely country star Ð an Italian kid from New Jersey who
regularly cut records in German and Yiddish. (A polkafied German-language
version of ?Everybody?s Somebody?s Foolœ hit #1 in Germany.) Francis had
made
her name with down-the-middle late-?50s dance-party hits like ?Stupid
Cupidœ
and ?Lipstick On Your Collar.œ
?Everybody?s Somebody?s Foolœ moved her gently away from sock-hop fare.
It?s
fast enough that it?s not quite a ballad and ruminative enough that it?s
not
quite a dance song. The organ on the intro sounds more like ?Baby Elephant
Walkœ than like country music. The lyrics nod toward world-weary wisdom
while
Francis? delivery sounds distinctly teenage. It?s all slightly awkward,
but
there?s a nice plaint in her voice, and it really sells the song.
GRADE: 5/10
He seems to have this muddled with an earlier song of the same title
that was a country hit for Little Jimmy Dickens. (If I have this wrong,
blame Wikipedia.)
The Connie got into the 20s on the BB Country chart, but it's not like she started a slew of country hits or something.
Wasn't this the period when the Billboard charts spilled into each
other in a big way?
Only pop and R&B, not country.
Roger Ford
2018-11-29 05:35:44 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:38:56 -0600, Mark Dintenfass
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis ­ ³Everybody¹s Somebody¹s Fool²
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
We¹ve heard plenty of stories of singers, or songs, crossing over from
country audiences to the pop mainstream. Stories of pop singers who went
country aren¹t so common, and these days, they tend to involve late-career
self-reinventors like Darius Rucker. But Connie Francis, at the peak of her
fame, made the transition from pop to country ‹ or a very pop version of
country, anyway ‹ and it proved to be a smart move.
Francis was an unlikely country star ‹ an Italian kid from New Jersey who
regularly cut records in German and Yiddish. (A polkafied German-language
version of ³Everybody¹s Somebody¹s Fool² hit #1 in Germany.) Francis had made
her name with down-the-middle late-¹50s dance-party hits like ³Stupid Cupid²
and ³Lipstick On Your Collar.²
³Everybody¹s Somebody¹s Fool² moved her gently away from sock-hop fare. It¹s
fast enough that it¹s not quite a ballad and ruminative enough that it¹s not
quite a dance song. The organ on the intro sounds more like ³Baby Elephant
Walk² than like country music. The lyrics nod toward world-weary wisdom while
Francis¹ delivery sounds distinctly teenage. It¹s all slightly awkward, but
there¹s a nice plaint in her voice, and it really sells the song.
GRADE: 5/10
He seems to have this muddled with an earlier song of the same title
that was a country hit for Little Jimmy Dickens. (If I have this wrong,
blame Wikipedia.)
It was Little Jimmy Scott who sang on the different earlier
"Everybody's Fool" but the 1950 record credits just "Lionel Hampton &
Band"



Kay Starr had the big pop record on the song that year and of course
the Heartbeats revived the same song later
Post by Mark Dintenfass
I never thought Connie's record as anything but
slightly rock-tinged pop--if I ever actually thought about it at all.
Same here



ROGER FORD
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Roger Ford
2018-11-29 05:28:36 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 11:47:00 -0800 (PST), Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit =
#1 in the Billboard Hot 100.
Connie Francis =E2=80=93 =E2=80=9CEverybody=E2=80=99s Somebody=E2=80=99s Fo=
ol=E2=80=9D
HIT #1: June 27, 1960
STAYED AT #1: 2 weeks
So-so Connie on a jaunty enough pop number that owes nothing to
previous songs of the same name. and also owes little (if anything) to
country music

Surprisingly it was her first #1 in USA (both "Who's Sorry Now" and
"Stupid Cupid" had topped the charts previously here in the USA).

Here's how it did in the 1960 Singles Battle

R1
16 Connie Francis - Everybody's Somebody's Fool - MGM 12899
10 Joyce Harris - No Way Out - Domino 905**
R2
15 Connie Francis - Everybody's Somebody's Fool - MGM 12899
19 The Devotions - Rip Van Winkle - Delta 1001
** The Joyce Harris record is excellent and she was badly robbed here


ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
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Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
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