Discussion:
It's All In The Games
Add Reply
Roger Ford
2018-11-03 19:19:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Tying in with the recent thread on Tommy Edwards' 1958 #1 hit "It's
All In The Game" here is my take on a few other versions of the much
recorded song

Here's my favorites :-

1. TOMMY EDWARDS (1958)

One of the very best examples of an artist re-visiting one of his much
earlier recordings and coming up with a much improved version (and
certainly a much bigger selling one).And one that STILL remains the
best ever rendering of the song for me



2. FOUR TOPS (1970)

Taken from their LP "Still Waters Run Deep" this very good soulful
version did much better here in UK (Top 3 in NME) than back in the
boys' native USA



3. NAT "KING" COLE (1957)

The ultra smooth Nat Cole version (that precedes Tommy Edwards'
remake) appeared on his best LP "Love Is The Thing" that year that
also spawned one of his finest ever recordings---"When I Fall In Love"



4. TYRONE DAVIS (1973)

From his LP of the same title the always reliable Tyrone lives up to
his biggest hit and promptly turns back the hands of time to stamp his
own marker on the Tommy Edwards classic and bring it slam bang up to
date in the soul age



5. RICKY NELSON (1959)

Here's the recent "man of the moment" on here.The song comes from his
third Imperial LP "Ricky Sings Again" and was written by Jerry Fuller
the YT poster says. I don't think so somehow. Ricky does a competent
but unspectacular version that he obviously plugged on his parents TV
show that never made it to the UK. Wonder if that endless lip synching
he did on there ever really fooled anyone? .



HONORABLE MENTIONS

LOUIS ARMSTRONG (1951)

Satch is in fine vocal form here on his version (that was in direct
competition with Tommy Edwards first time out) but the long over
burdened string filled intro (thanks to Gordon Jenkins) does little
for me and may well kill it dead for others



EDDIE HOLMAN (1969)

I was hooked on Eddie Holman from the first time I ever heard "This
Can't Be True". Later his biggest hit "Hey There Lonely Girl" was a
favorite and was hindered for me not one jot by having this nice
version of the song under scutiny here on the flip



CLIFF RICHARD (1963)

Surprisingly not bad version by our own Sir Cliff that was a huge UK
hit (on Columbia) and did OK on US chart too (on Epic)



and for historic interest.......

JIMMY DORSEY (1940)

An earlier incarnation of the song based on the same Dawes melody but
with different lyrics (Bob Eberly vcl) and titled "Let Me Dream".



Lots more versions out there!

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
Dean F.
2018-11-04 01:29:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
Lots more versions out there!
Van Morrison completely recast the song in 1979.
Roger Ford
2018-11-04 07:54:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 3 Nov 2018 18:29:00 -0700 (PDT), "Dean F."
Post by Dean F.
Post by Roger Ford
Lots more versions out there!
Van Morrison completely recast the song in 1979.
Soryy Dean but for me the very disappointing Van The Man version is
down there with Donny & Marie for me on this song. I was also
surprised at how dire the Johnny Mathis version turned out and also
the way-too-fast Buddy Bailey & The Clovers attempt

OTOH the inevitable Pat Boone rendering is slightly better than might
be expected :)

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
SavoyBG
2018-11-04 01:49:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
Tying in with the recent thread on Tommy Edwards' 1958 #1 hit "It's
All In The Game" here is my take on a few other versions of the much
recorded song
Here's my favorites :-
3. NAT "KING" COLE (1957)
The ultra smooth Nat Cole version (that precedes Tommy Edwards'
remake) appeared on his best LP "Love Is The Thing" that year that
also spawned one of his finest ever recordings---"When I Fall In Love"
I figured that Cole's version was the template for Edwards 1958 version.
RWC
2018-11-04 09:42:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
Tying in with the recent thread on Tommy Edwards' 1958 #1 hit "It's
All In The Game" here is my take on a few other versions of the much
recorded song
The melody was composed in 1912, by Brig. Gen. Charles G. Dawes (1865-1951), a
Chicago bank president at the time, and future US Vice President (1925-29 under
Calvin Coolidge).

"It wasn't until 1951 when lyricist Carl Sigman wrote the more familiar set of
words to "It's All in the Game"".
Post by Roger Ford
Here's my favorites :-
1. TOMMY EDWARDS (1958)
One of the very best examples of an artist re-visiting one of his much
earlier recordings
, from 1951, with Leroy Holmes Orch.

- MusicProf78; a waltz
Post by Roger Ford
and coming up with a much improved version (and
certainly a much bigger selling one).
** And one that STILL remains the best ever rendering of the song for me **
http://youtu.be/X0qjtP5EUDs
- a rock shuffle rhythm
Post by Roger Ford
2. FOUR TOPS (1970)
Taken from their LP "Still Waters Run Deep" this very good soulful
version did much better here in UK (Top 3 in NME) than back in the
boys' native USA
http://youtu.be/_85dx1nl3RA
just for this one, an alternative copy if I may:

Post by Roger Ford
3. NAT "KING" COLE (1957)
The ultra smooth Nat Cole version (that precedes Tommy Edwards'
remake) appeared on his best LP "Love Is The Thing" that year that
also spawned one of his finest ever recordings---"When I Fall In Love"
http://youtu.be/dqUImQmqQ7s
the un-smooth 'in your face' strings ruin this version, for me (even if the
original 1912 "Melody in A major" was published as a violin solo :-); the
instrumentation should have been more sparse, with just Nat on piano and ...
Post by Roger Ford
4. TYRONE DAVIS (1973)
From his LP of the same title the always reliable Tyrone lives up to
his biggest hit and promptly turns back the hands of time to stamp his
own marker on the Tommy Edwards classic and bring it slam bang up to
date in the soul age
http://youtu.be/hol-cISkYhA
Again, the instrumentation is too busy and too much to the fore, as if the vocal
is just another instrument in a rowdy large 'band'.
Post by Roger Ford
5. RICKY NELSON (1959)
Here's the recent "man of the moment" on here.The song comes from his
third Imperial LP "Ricky Sings Again. Ricky does a competent
but unspectacular version that he obviously plugged on his parents TV
show that never made it to the UK.
http://youtu.be/jPgHn1ekUvY
At last, a nice arrangement for this song; this version is 'pleasant' at the
very least. Ricky, it seems, had some solid and sophisticated (by pop-rock
standards anyway) producers/arrangers/sound engineers behind him at Imperial
(from Sep 1957 onwards) - his recordings are not 'overcooked'.
Post by Roger Ford
and for historic interest.......
JIMMY DORSEY (1940)
An earlier incarnation of the song based on the same Dawes melody but
with different lyrics (Bob Eberly vcl) and titled "Let Me Dream".
http://youtu.be/SfIwVMYGGU4
and on June 17, 1942, brother Tommy Dorsey, AHO, recorded this tune as "Melody"
(no vocal, but a trombone solo by Tommy) - released on Victor's more serious
'classical' Red label
- from original 78 by MusicProf

In Aug 1940, Eddie South (jazz violinist, 1904-1962) released a beautifully
played 'gypsy' version of Melody in A major (on Columbia album 'Dark Angel of
the Violin'):

"One of the top violinists of the pre-bop era, Eddie South was a brilliant
technician who, were it not for the universal racism of the time, would probably
have been a top classical violinist."
"In 1937, Eddie South, an African-American, returned to Paris and
performed and recorded with Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli.":
- Bach
- Sweet Georgia Brown

The first release (according to secondhandsongs) was by
Fritz Kreisler - Melody in A major [Victrola 725-A] - recorded March 31, 1921; a
violin solo, accompanied by Carl Lamson on piano
or


the tune (I nearly said Melody :-) is even clearer here:
Dorothy Miller Duckwitz - piano roll issued Feb 1925


These are the few other versions in my collection:

Buddy Bailey and The Clovers - [Porwin 1004 A] - 1963
Sammy Kaye, v. Cliff Ayers - [Columbia 39531; b-side] - 1951
Mike Redway - [UK Embassy WB586] - 1963
Bobby Vee - [LP Liberty ... Sings Your Favourites] - 1960; violins up front,
with chimming piano in the distance; vocal with distinct tremelo
Dinah Shore - [RCA 4233] - 1951
Freddy Fender - [LP If You're Ever In Texas] - 1976 - a tidy smorgasbord of
instrumention (and it's on a Reprise single in 1991)
Andy Williams - [LP Two Time Winners] - 1959; the chimming piano rules, with
string orchestra, and occasional clever melody-shifting guitar
Hank Marvin - [LP Hank Plays Cliff] - 1995
Jane Morgan - [LP ... Sings the Great Golden Hits] - 1961
Johnnie Ray - [LP A Sinner I Am] - 1959
Lenny Dee - [LP ... Plays the Hits] - 1959 - organ instro
Narvel Felts - the last track on [LP Hi 'This Time'] - 1976
Pat Boone - recorded Aug 13, 1960 [Dot unissued] - typical okay Pat Boone ballad
at Dot, like they simply changed the sheet music between session songs
Sammy Davis Jr - [LP ... Sings the Big Ones for Young Lovers] - 1964
Loading...