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A question only Bobby M can answer
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DianeE
2018-11-30 00:52:07 UTC
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I've always meant to ask you this. In the middle of the song
"Hush-A-Meca" by The Casanovas
for like 3 seconds
starting at 1:54) it seems like they sing one line in Korean. Does it
actually make any sense in Korean, or is it just a nonsense lyric?

(I know how to say hello, goodbye, thank you, and I'm tired, and that's
the extent of my Korean vocabulary. I think "on yon hush a meca" in the
song is a takeoff on the Korean words for hello but I can't swear to it.)

Thanks for your expert input!

Best regards DEM
BobbyM
2018-11-30 03:03:57 UTC
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Post by DianeE
I've always meant to ask you this. In the middle of the song
"Hush-A-Meca" by The Casanovas
http://youtu.be/OI_dfPHjuiA for like 3 seconds
starting at 1:54) it seems like they sing one line in Korean. Does it
actually make any sense in Korean, or is it just a nonsense lyric?
(I know how to say hello, goodbye, thank you, and I'm tired, and that's
the extent of my Korean vocabulary. I think "on yon hush a meca" in the
song is a takeoff on the Korean words for hello but I can't swear to it.)
Thanks for your expert input!
Best regards DEM
Although my wife is Korean, I don't speak a lot of it either. I can read it fairly well, but don't understand half the words I read :) Even so, I do know that the singer's Korean is terrible. The first word he's supposed to be saying is the Korean equivalent to our "hello", but it literally means, "are you at/in peace". The second phrase sounds like he's trying to say "I love you" but I even had a Korean friend at work listen to it & he had no better guess. Finally, he says "bali iddi wah" which means "hurry" & "go/come" which ties in to the English lyric that follows.

Diane, in case you're not aware, there is a hierarchy in the Korean language. While you may know one "hello" and "goodbye", for example, the endings of many words differ depending upon whether you're talking to a senior or a person of a higher class vs. your equal or lesser class. That's why the first things a Korean normally asks a person is how old are you & what's your job.
SavoyBG
2018-11-30 03:09:17 UTC
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Post by BobbyM
Diane, in case you're not aware, there is a hierarchy in the Korean language. While you may know one "hello" and "goodbye", for example, the endings of many words differ depending upon whether you're talking to a senior or a person of a higher class vs. your equal or lesser class.
That is REALLY fucked up.
BobbyM
2018-11-30 03:55:08 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by BobbyM
Diane, in case you're not aware, there is a hierarchy in the Korean language. While you may know one "hello" and "goodbye", for example, the endings of many words differ depending upon whether you're talking to a senior or a person of a higher class vs. your equal or lesser class.
That is REALLY fucked up.
I agree & I don't use the superlative myself. However, unlike the US, they were a country of kings & other royalty & peasants for hundreds of years & then they were under Japanese rule, so they didn't have a president until that guy that Billy Joel sang about in We Didn't Start the Fire. And it's only been recently, probably less than 40 years, that a middle class developed.
BobbyM
2018-11-30 06:32:37 UTC
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Post by BobbyM
Post by DianeE
I've always meant to ask you this. In the middle of the song
"Hush-A-Meca" by The Casanovas
http://youtu.be/OI_dfPHjuiA for like 3 seconds
starting at 1:54) it seems like they sing one line in Korean. Does it
actually make any sense in Korean, or is it just a nonsense lyric?
(I know how to say hello, goodbye, thank you, and I'm tired, and that's
the extent of my Korean vocabulary. I think "on yon hush a meca" in the
song is a takeoff on the Korean words for hello but I can't swear to it.)
Thanks for your expert input!
Best regards DEM
Although my wife is Korean, I don't speak a lot of it either. I can read it fairly well, but don't understand half the words I read :) Even so, I do know that the singer's Korean is terrible. The first word he's supposed to be saying is the Korean equivalent to our "hello", but it literally means, "are you at/in peace". The second phrase sounds like he's trying to say "I love you" but I even had a Korean friend at work listen to it & he had no better guess. Finally, he says "bali iddi wah" which means "hurry" & "go/come" which ties in to the English lyric that follows.
Diane, in case you're not aware, there is a hierarchy in the Korean language. While you may know one "hello" and "goodbye", for example, the endings of many words differ depending upon whether you're talking to a senior or a person of a higher class vs. your equal or lesser class. That's why the first things a Korean normally asks a person is how old are you & what's your job.
Forgot to mention that the title of the song, "Hush-A-Meca" is probably the superlative ending of the Korean word for "hello"; but with the first syllable missing, I don't think it has any meaning.
Dennis C
2018-11-30 13:33:23 UTC
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Koreans really got into that Seoul music, baby!
DianeE
2018-11-30 16:16:00 UTC
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Post by BobbyM
Post by DianeE
I've always meant to ask you this. In the middle of the song
"Hush-A-Meca" by The Casanovas
http://youtu.be/OI_dfPHjuiA for like 3 seconds
starting at 1:54) it seems like they sing one line in Korean. Does it
actually make any sense in Korean, or is it just a nonsense lyric?
(I know how to say hello, goodbye, thank you, and I'm tired, and that's
the extent of my Korean vocabulary. I think "on yon hush a meca" in the
song is a takeoff on the Korean words for hello but I can't swear to it.)
Thanks for your expert input!
Best regards DEM
Although my wife is Korean, I don't speak a lot of it either. I can read it fairly well, but don't understand half the words I read :) Even so, I do know that the singer's Korean is terrible. The first word he's supposed to be saying is the Korean equivalent to our "hello", but it literally means, "are you at/in peace". The second phrase sounds like he's trying to say "I love you" but I even had a Korean friend at work listen to it & he had no better guess. Finally, he says "bali iddi wah" which means "hurry" & "go/come" which ties in to the English lyric that follows.
Diane, in case you're not aware, there is a hierarchy in the Korean language. While you may know one "hello" and "goodbye", for example, the endings of many words differ depending upon whether you're talking to a senior or a person of a higher class vs. your equal or lesser class. That's why the first things a Korean normally asks a person is how old are you & what's your job.
------------No, I didn't know that!
My experience obviously is with Korean-*Americans*, of whom there are
very many here in Queens, and I think they've adapted pretty quickly to
American culture, because of the hundreds I've met not one has asked how
old I am!
But thanks for the tip--in case I meet someone who hasn't acculturated yet.
BobbyM
2018-11-30 21:29:28 UTC
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Post by DianeE
Post by BobbyM
I've always meant to ask you this.  In the middle of the song
"Hush-A-Meca" by The Casanovas
http://youtu.be/OI_dfPHjuiA for like 3 seconds
starting at 1:54) it seems like they sing one line in Korean. Does it
actually make any sense in Korean, or is it just a nonsense lyric?
(I know how to say hello, goodbye, thank you, and I'm tired, and that's
the extent of my Korean vocabulary.  I think "on yon hush a meca" in the
song is a takeoff on the Korean words for hello but I can't swear to it.)
Thanks for your expert input!
Best regards DEM
Although my wife is Korean, I don't speak a lot of it either. I can
read it fairly well, but don't understand half the words I read :)
Even so, I do know that the singer's Korean is terrible.  The first
word he's supposed to be saying is the Korean equivalent to our
"hello", but it literally means, "are you at/in peace".  The second
phrase sounds like he's trying to say "I love you"  but I even had a
Korean friend at work listen to it & he had no better guess.  Finally,
he says "bali iddi wah" which means "hurry" & "go/come" which ties in
to the English lyric that follows.
Diane, in case you're not aware, there is a hierarchy in the Korean
language.  While you may know one "hello" and "goodbye", for example,
the endings of many words differ depending upon whether you're talking
to a senior or a person of a higher class vs. your equal or lesser
class.  That's why the first things a Korean normally asks a person is
how old are you & what's your job.
------------No, I didn't know that!
My experience obviously is with Korean-*Americans*, of whom there are
very many here in Queens, and I think they've adapted pretty quickly to
American culture, because of the hundreds I've met not one has asked how
old I am!
But thanks for the tip--in case I meet someone who hasn't acculturated yet.
They're less likely to ask if you are older than they are, because they
are probably still raised to respect their elders. FYI kids are
initially taught to say a shortened version of hello, "anyong" & it's
common to use that with close friends, no matter how old you are. The
word translates to "peace" & Koreans of all ages still frequently give
the peace sign when taking pictures.
Bob Roman
2018-11-30 21:36:18 UTC
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Post by BobbyM
They're less likely to ask if you are older than they are, because they
are probably still raised to respect their elders. FYI kids are
initially taught to say a shortened version of hello, "anyong"
As seen on the sitcom "Arrested Development."

https://arresteddevelopment.fandom.com/wiki/Annyong_Bluth

--
BR

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