Discussion:
1959
(too old to reply)
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 02:51:27 UTC
Permalink
It's gonna take much longer for me to revise and expand my yearly
lists from the 50s, but I have 1959 done. It came out exactly to a top
250.


MY TOP 100 RECORDINGS FROM 1959:
1 ¦ You're So Fine ¦ Falcons
2 ¦ Dead Man's Stroll ¦ Revels
3 ¦ What'd I Say ¦ Ray Charles
4 ¦ Rooster Blues ¦ Lightnin' Slim
5 ¦ I Know It's Hard But It's Fair ¦ Five Royales
6 ¦ Let The Good Times Roll ¦ Ray Charles
7 ¦ There You Go ¦ Clyde McPhatter (Drifters)
8 ¦ Be My Guest ¦ Fats Domino
9 ¦ Beyond The Sea ¦ Bobby Darin
10 ¦ A Big Hunk O' Love ¦ Elvis Presley
11 ¦ I Never Felt Like This ¦ Jack Scott
12 ¦ That Is Rock And Roll ¦ Coasters
13 ¦ Baby What You Want Me To Do ¦ Jimmy Reed
14 ¦ Love's Made A Fool Of You ¦ Crickets
15 ¦ 'Til I Kissed You ¦ Everly Brothers
16 ¦ Don't Mess With My Man ¦ Irma Thomas
17 ¦ I'm Ready (undubbed version) ¦ Fats Domino
18 ¦ Fannie Mae ¦ Buster Brown
19 ¦ Kansas City ¦ Little Richard
20 ¦ Back In The USA ¦ Chuck Berry
21 ¦ Gonna Stick To You Baby ¦ Lonesome Sundown
22 ¦ Alimony ¦ Frankie Ford
23 ¦ Tu-Ber-Cu-Lucas & Sinus Blues ¦ Huey "Piano" Smith & Clowns
24 ¦ Love Potion # 9 ¦ Clovers
25 ¦ Hallelujah I Love Her So (undubbed) ¦ Eddie Cochran
26 ¦ Broken Hearted Melody ¦ Sarah Vaughan
27 ¦ Rockin' Behind The Iron Curtain ¦ Bobby Marchan & The Clowns
28 ¦ Little Queenie ¦ Chuck Berry
29 ¦ Boogie Chillun (Vee Jay version) ¦ John Lee Hooker
30 ¦ "GI" Slim ¦ Lightnin' Slim
31 ¦ Poison Ivy ¦ Coasters
32 ¦ You Can't Beat Uncle Sam ¦ Chris Kenner
33 ¦ Look At Little Sister ¦ Hank Ballard & Midnighters
34 ¦ Little Girl ¦ Bo Diddley
35 ¦ Sweet Little Woman ¦ Lightnin' Slim
36 ¦ I'm Trying ¦ Little Milton
37 ¦ What In The World's Come Over You ¦ Jack Scott
38 ¦ Peggy Sue Got Married ¦ Buddy Holly
39 ¦ Handy Man ¦ Jimmy Jones
40 ¦ 40 Miles Of Bad Road ¦ Duane Eddy
41 ¦ (Do The) Mashed Potatoes ¦ Nat Kendrick & Swans
42 ¦ I Hear You Knockin' ¦ Lazy Lester
43 ¦ Lightnin's Troubles ¦ Lightnin' Slim
44 ¦ My Baby Is A Good 'Un ¦ Otis Rush
45 ¦ Kansas City ¦ Wilbert Harrison
46 ¦ All Night Long ¦ Little Richard
47 ¦ Childhood Sweetheart ¦ Chuck Berry
48 ¦ Good Good Lovin' ¦ James Brown
49 ¦ Hurry Up ¦ Paul Marvin
50 ¦ It's Late ¦ Ricky Nelson
51 ¦ Sweet Nothin's ¦ Brenda Lee
52 ¦ Kansas City ¦ Hank Ballard & Midnighters
53 ¦ Dream Lover ¦ Bobby Darin
54 ¦ Easy Rockin' ¦ Eddie Lang
55 ¦ The Great Grandfather ¦ Bo Diddley
56 ¦ It Doesn't Matter Anymore ¦ Buddy Holly
57 ¦ That's Why (I Love You So) ¦ Jackie Wilson
58 ¦ Stand By Me Father ¦ Soul Stirrers
59 ¦ Babalu's Wedding Day ¦ Eternals
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
61 ¦ Island Of Love ¦ Sheppards
62 ¦ Take Out Some Insurance ¦ Jimmy Reed
63 ¦ Buzz Me Baby ¦ Slim Harpo
64 ¦ Almost Grown ¦ Chuck Berry
65 ¦ Mountain Of Love ¦ Harold Dorman
66 ¦ Running Bear ¦ Johnny Preston
67 ¦ Bad Girl ¦ Miracles
68 ¦ Kissin' Time ¦ Bobby Rydell
69 ¦ Mack The Knife ¦ Bobby Darin
70 ¦ Shout ¦ Isley Brothers
71 ¦ Mary Lou ¦ Ronnie Hawkins
72 ¦ Hey Little Girl ¦ Dee Clark
73 ¦ I Need Your Love ¦ Gay Poppers
75 ¦ Tell Him No ¦ Travis & Bob
76 ¦ Thanks A Lot ¦ Johnny Cash
77 ¦ 59 Volvo ¦ Medallions
78 ¦ Sea Of Love ¦ Phil Phillips
79 ¦ I Want To Walk You Home ¦ Fats Domino
80 ¦ Walkin' Through The Park ¦ Muddy Waters
80 ¦ Don't Let It Go ¦ Bo Diddley
81 ¦ Go To The Mardi Gras ¦ Professor Longhair
82 ¦ Money ¦ Barrett Strong
83 ¦ Lost Week End ¦ Smiley Lewis
84 ¦ Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide ¦ Sonny Boy Williamson
85 ¦ Crazy Mixed Up World ¦ Little Walter
86 ¦ Believe What You Say (LP Version) ¦ Ricky Nelson
87 ¦ She Knows How To Rock (live) ¦ Carl Perkins
88 ¦ By The Water ¦ Smiley Lewis
89 ¦ The Woman I Love ¦ B.B. King
90 ¦ A Fool Such As I ¦ Elvis Presley
91 ¦ If I (Could Be With You Tonight) ¦ Diablos
92 ¦ I've Got To Change ¦ James Brown
93 ¦ Rock And Roll Daddy-O ¦ Joey Castle
94 ¦ Linda Lu ¦ Ray Sharpe
95 ¦ You Don't Love Me ¦ Bo Diddley
96 ¦ Good Looking And Foxy Too ¦ Roy Brown
97 ¦ You Got What It Takes ¦ Marv Johnson
98 ¦ We Got Love ¦ Bobby Rydell
99 ¦ Memphis, Tennessee ¦ Chuck Berry
100 ¦ When Day Is Done ¦ Shirley & Lee

BUBBLING UNDER FROM 1959:
101 ¦ Would You Believe It ¦ Huey "Piano" Smith & Clowns
102 ¦ Anthony Boy ¦ Chuck Berry
103 ¦ Midnight Flyer ¦ Nat King Cole
104 ¦ Crackin' Up ¦ Bo Diddley
105 ¦ Frankie And Johnny ¦ Champion Jack Dupree
106 ¦ My Last Meal ¦ Jimmy Rogers
107 ¦ I Got It ¦ Little Richard
108 ¦ Teenager In Love ¦ Dion & Belmonts
109 ¦ Love You So ¦ Ron Holden & Thunderbirds
110 ¦ Lookout ¦ Rockin' Bradley
111 ¦ Tallahassee Lassie ¦ Freddy Cannon
112 ¦ The Battle Of New Orleans ¦ Johnny Horton
113 ¦ By The Light Of The Silvery Moon ¦ Little Richard
114 ¦ Rough And Bold ¦ Andy Dio
115 ¦ I'll Be Satisfied ¦ Jackie Wilson
116 ¦ Ways Of A Man ¦ Guitar Shorty
117 ¦ Recipe For Love ¦ Muddy Waters
118 ¦ She's My Baby ¦ Flash Terry
119 ¦ Don't Blame It On Me (live) ¦ Eddie Cochran
120 ¦ I Need Your Love Tonight ¦ Elvis Presley
121 ¦ Let's Jump The Broomstick ¦ Brenda Lee
122 ¦ Never Be Anyone Else But You ¦ Ricky Nelson
123 ¦ Forty Days ¦ Ronnie Hawkins
124 ¦ Somethin' Else ¦ Eddie Cochran
125 ¦ Rockin' Little Angel ¦ Ray Smith
126 ¦ Rockin' In The Jungle ¦ Eternals
127 ¦ Guitar Boogie Shuffle ¦ Virtues
128 ¦ After I've Done The Best That I Can ¦ Hightower Brothers
129 ¦ Rock Crazy Baby ¦ Art Adams
130 ¦ Try Try Baby ¦ Clyde McPhatter (Drifters)
131 ¦ Hasten Jason ¦ Roulettes
132 ¦ Won't Have To...Anymore ¦ Jessie Lee & Rhythmaires
133 ¦ Would You ¦ Fats Domino
134 ¦ Well, You Know ¦ Dusty Brown
135 ¦ You Gonna Wreck My Life ¦ Howlin' Wolf
136 ¦ The Story Of Bo Diddley ¦ Bo Diddley
137 ¦ Six Nights A Week ¦ Crests
138 ¦ Only Sixteen ¦ Sam Cooke
139 ¦ Goin' Home ¦ Rosco Gordon
140 ¦ Stranded ¦ Little Junior Parker
141 ¦ I've Been Around ¦ Fats Domino
142 ¦ Bye Bye Baby ¦ Channels
143 ¦ My Rifle, My Pony And Me ¦ Dean Martin & Ricky Nelson
144 ¦ Why Are You So Mean ¦ Albert King
145 ¦ Done Done The Slop ¦ Ervin Rucker
146 ¦ Music To My Ear ¦ Speck & Doyle
147 ¦ Who's That Knocking ¦ Genies
148 ¦ Go, Jimmy, Go ¦ Jimmy Clanton
149 ¦ Nasty Boogie ¦ Champion Jack Dupree
150 ¦ It's So Good ¦ Little Esther
151 ¦ Going To New York ¦ Jimmy Reed
152 ¦ Let It Please By You ¦ Desires
153 ¦ Bad Habit ¦ Willie Loftin & Discords
154 ¦ Dancing Girl ¦ Bo Diddley
155 ¦ What a Difference a Day Makes ¦ Dinah Washington
156 ¦ Baby Talk ¦ Jan & Dean
157 ¦ Traveling Stranger ¦ Little Anthony & Imperials
158 ¦ Oh My Love ¦ Drifters
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
160 ¦ Mr. Soul ¦ Clifton Chenier
161 ¦ Sharpest Guy In Town ¦ Big Moe & Panics
162 ¦ A Long Vacation ¦ Ricky Nelson
163 ¦ Primrose Lane ¦ Jerry Wallace
164 ¦ At The Prom ¦ Flamingos
165 ¦ Tafu ¦ Senators
166 ¦ It Must Be Love ¦ Al Downing
167 ¦ I Better Go Now ¦ Howlin' Wolf
168 ¦ Drink Of Wine, Mop Mop ¦ Sticks McGhee
169 ¦ I Only Have Eyes For You ¦ Flamingos
170 ¦ Crying, Waiting, Hoping ¦ Buddy Holly
171 ¦ (Sorry) I Ran All The Way Home ¦ Impalas
172 ¦ My Heart Is An Open Book ¦ Carl Dobkins Jr.
173 ¦ There Must Be A Reason ¦ James Brown
174 ¦ Run Bo Diddley (version #2) ¦ Bo Diddley
175 ¦ Something About My Baby ¦ Arthur Johnson
176 ¦ Do You Ever Think of Me ¦ Little Esther
177 ¦ There Goes My Baby ¦ Drifters
178 ¦ These Three Words ¦ Spaniels
179 ¦ Rock Everybody Rock ¦ McKinley Mitchell
180 ¦ Red River Rock ¦ Johnny & Hurricanes
181 ¦ Charlie Brown ¦ Coasters
182 ¦ Along Came Jones ¦ Coasters
183 ¦ Millionaire Hobo ¦ Fantastics
184 ¦ Swing It, Little Katy ¦ Clyde Owens
185 ¦ You Better Know It ¦ Jackie Wilson
186 ¦ Blast Off ¦ Alden Holloway
187 ¦ When The Saints Go Marching In ¦ Fats Domino
188 ¦ (I Have The) Same Old Blues ¦ Little Milton
189 ¦ I'll Keep You Happy ¦ Hank Ballard & Midnighters
190 ¦ Zoom-Boom-Zing ¦ Cadillacs
191 ¦ Worry Worry ¦ B.B. King
192 ¦ Road Runner ¦ Bo Diddley
193 ¦ Mr. Airplane Man ¦ Howlin' Wolf
194 ¦ Nothing But Love ¦ Bobo Jenkins
195 ¦ Woman, You Talk Too Much ¦ Al "Dr. Horse" Pittman
196 ¦ Real Gone Daddy ¦ Jim Flaherty's Caravan
197 ¦ You're Not In Love With Me ¦ Pearls
198 ¦ Stack-O-Lee ¦ Champion Jack Dupree
199 ¦ Way Down Yonder In New Orleans ¦ Freddy Cannon
200 ¦ Sweet Talk ¦ Rusty York
201 ¦ Woo-Hoo ¦ Rock-A-Teens
202 ¦ Turn Me Loose ¦ Fabian
203 ¦ The Natchez Burnin' ¦ Howlin' Wolf
204 ¦ Shimmy, Shimmy, Ko-Ko-Bop ¦ Little Anthony & Imperials
205 ¦ Just Keep It Up ¦ Dee Clark
206 ¦ I Won't Cry ¦ Johnny Adams
207 ¦ My Love Will Never Die ¦ Channels
208 ¦ I'm Sorry ¦ Bo Diddley
209 ¦ There Is Something On Your Mind ¦ Big Jay McNeely (Little Sonny)
210 ¦ Crying For My Baby ¦ Harold Burrage
211 ¦ Tender Love ¦ King Bees
212 ¦ I Never Do Wrong ¦ Sonny Boy Williamson
213 ¦ Alice Mae Blues ¦ Sonny Boy Williams
214 ¦ Loud Mouth Annie ¦ Myles & Dupont
215 ¦ I Love An Angel ¦ Little Bill & Bluenotes
216 ¦ I Believe To My Soul ¦ Ray Charles
217 ¦ 100 Years From Today ¦ Spaniels
218 ¦ Honey, You Talk Too Much ¦ Orville Fox & Harmony Masters
219 ¦ Peter Pumpkin Eater ¦ Troupers
220 ¦ She's Alright ¦ Bo Diddley
221 ¦ Knockin' At Your Door ¦ Elmore James
222 ¦ Bad Luck And Trouble ¦ Boogie Jake
223 ¦ I Wanna Be Loved ¦ Jimmy Reed
224 ¦ Wonder Where Your Love Has Gone ¦ Five Royales
225 ¦ I Took Your Love For A Toy ¦ Five Keys
226 ¦ I'm Leaving This Town ¦ Mr. Bo
227 ¦ Playing In The Park ¦ Philip Walker
228 ¦ Black Cadillac ¦ Joyce Green
229 ¦ Lonely Blue Boy ¦ Conway Twitty
230 ¦ Why ¦ Cadillacs
231 ¦ Lipstick On Your Collar ¦ Connie Francis
232 ¦ All Night Long (part 1) ¦ Robert Parker
233 ¦ I'm Gonna Be A Wheel Someday ¦ Fats Domino
234 ¦ Misty ¦ Johnny Mathis
235 ¦ So Good ¦ Ervin Rucker
236 ¦ Little Rome ¦ Max Alexander
237 ¦ Brand New Cadillac ¦ Vince Taylor
238 ¦ Ballin' Keen ¦ Bobby & Terry Caraway
239 ¦ Brown Eyed Girl ¦ Hal Andrews
240 ¦ Rock On The Moon ¦ Deacon & Rock and Rollers
241 ¦ Billy The Kid ¦ Raves
242 ¦ Cool It, Fool ¦ Cadillacs
243 ¦ Talk That Talk ¦ Jackie Wilson
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
245 ¦ It Was I ¦ Skip & Flip
246 ¦ Mope-Itty Mope ¦ Boss-Tones
247 ¦ Have love, Will Travel ¦ Richard Berry & Pharaohs
248 ¦ Lorraine ¦ Bonnevilles
249 ¦ Lonesome And Blue ¦ Little Richard
250 ¦ Here Comes Summer ¦ Jerry Keller
Dean F.
2012-08-13 02:55:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
It's gonna take much longer for me to revise and expand my yearly
lists from the 50s, but I have 1959 done. It came out exactly to a top
250.
You might consider removing the "100" from your list names now.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 03:53:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
It's gonna take much longer for me to revise and expand my yearly
lists from the 50s, but I have 1959 done. It came out exactly to a top
250.
You might consider removing the "100" from your list names now.
No, because this is there too:

BUBBLING UNDER FROM 1959:
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 03:29:57 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 12, 10:51 pm, The Bloomfield Buddy <***@aol.com> wrote:
.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
17 ¦ I'm Ready (undubbed version) ¦ Fats Domino
This is so much better without the hand claps.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
25 ¦ Hallelujah I Love Her So (undubbed) ¦ Eddie Cochran
It wa amazing to get this without the violins after all these years.
Thanks to my friend in Helsinki, I think.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
27 ¦ Rockin' Behind The Iron Curtain ¦ Bobby Marchan & The Clowns
The Huey Smith version without the vocal group is from later.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
62 ¦ Take Out Some Insurance ¦ Jimmy Reed
A single later on but I have it listed as an album cut in 1959:

LP-1008 - Rockin' with Reed - Jimmy Reed [9/59] Reissues with "stereo"
on the cover are actually mono. Going To New York/A String To Your
Heart/Ends And Odds/Caress Me Baby/Take Out Some Insurance/The Moon Is
Rising//Down In Virginia/I Know It's A Sin/Wanna Be Loved/Baby, What's
On Your Mind/My Bitter Seed/Rockin' With Reed
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
86 ¦ Believe What You Say (LP Version) ¦ Ricky Nelson
New on the list, this is the version that features the Jordanaires
backing him up. They recorded their part somewhere else and it was
supposed to be on the single in 1958, but there was a foulup and
Imperial released the single without the Jordanaires part. I like it
better with the group, so I'm not gonna list the single in 1958.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
87 ¦ She Knows How To Rock (live) ¦ Carl Perkins
Excellent live version of the Piano Red (Rockin' With Red) song that
Little Richard did in 1958.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
112 ¦ The Battle Of New Orleans ¦ Johnny Horton
113 ¦ By The Light Of The Silvery Moon ¦ Little Richard
115 ¦ I'll Be Satisfied ¦ Jackie Wilson
These should have been here all along. These updates are also
occasionally finding something that I somehow missed that should have
been there based on its rating in my syste, These are all "8s"
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
127 ¦ Guitar Boogie Shuffle ¦ Virtues
I had about 130 new items to rank and I surprised myself when this
finished near the top of all the new items. It rocks.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
128 ¦ After I've Done The Best That I Can ¦ Hightower Brothers
Killer item on Herman Lubinsly's Gospel label, a Savoy subsidiary.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
129 ¦ Rock Crazy Baby ¦ Art Adams
Used to have several hundred copies of this, my friend found the label
owner and we bought most of what she had.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
131 ¦ Hasten Jason ¦ Roulettes
I'd get mocked at Relic for liking this.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
133 ¦ Would You ¦ Fats Domino
The Bartholomew original is better, but this is real good too.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
139 ¦ Goin' Home ¦ Rosco Gordon
Nice midtempo shuffle version of the Fats Domino classic from '52.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
143 ¦ My Rifle, My Pony And Me ¦ Dean Martin & Ricky Nelson
This was featured in the Sopranos episode when Tony is sitting in the
barn with a horse, goat and a dog, from "Rio Bravo" I think.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
145 ¦ Done Done The Slop ¦ Ervin Rucker
Sequel to his 1958 killer "I Want To Do It."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
146 ¦ Music To My Ear ¦ Speck & Doyle
Weird looking (and named) label.

Loading Image...
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
148 ¦ Go, Jimmy, Go ¦ Jimmy Clanton
Always liked this.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
150 ¦ It's So Good ¦ Little Esther
176 ¦ Do You Ever Think of Me ¦ Little Esther
Good Savoy two sider.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
158 ¦ Oh My Love ¦ Drifters
The better side IMO.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
Price sang his version on the Huckabee TV show. He's like 80 and still
sounds good.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
161 ¦ Sharpest Guy In Town ¦ Big Moe & Panics
This is a left over track from Boyd Bennett and the Rockets King
sessions. They put this out on an EP this year on their Audio Lab
subsidiary.

Loading Image...
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
162 ¦ A Long Vacation ¦ Ricky Nelson
Very good Bo Diddley beat record from an album this year and later on
a single that bubbled under.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
164 ¦ At The Prom ¦ Flamingos
The original flip, and the better side for me.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
168 ¦ Drink Of Wine, Mop Mop ¦ Sticks McGhee
Acoustic remake of his classic song from the 1940s.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
169 ¦ I Only Have Eyes For You ¦ Flamingos
177 ¦ There Goes My Baby ¦ Drifters
Sorry folks, that's as high as I could put these.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
172 ¦ My Heart Is An Open Book ¦ Carl Dobkins Jr.
This is awesome in stereo.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
181 ¦ Charlie Brown ¦ Coasters
182 ¦ Along Came Jones ¦ Coasters
They were definitely going to be back to back, just had to figure out
in which order.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
192 ¦ Road Runner ¦ Bo Diddley
Seems to either be from the last week of 1959 or the first week of
1960.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
195 ¦ Woman, You Talk Too Much ¦ Al "Dr. Horse" Pittman
218 ¦ Honey, You Talk Too Much ¦ Orville Fox & Harmony Masters
I'm sensing a pattern that was continued in 1960 by Joe Jones,
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
200 ¦ Sweet Talk ¦ Rusty York
Little known wild rocker that was recorded in 1959 but not issued
until many years later.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
202 ¦ Turn Me Loose ¦ Fabian
Yes, I like this.....somehow.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
216 ¦ I Believe To My Soul ¦ Ray Charles
This is the record where Ray sings all the girls parts himself.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
234 ¦ Misty ¦ Johnny Mathis
Sorry, Diane. I like it.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
239 ¦ Brown Eyed Girl ¦ Hal Andrews
The little known original version of the Van Morrison hit from 1967.






JUST KIDDING
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
246 ¦ Mope-Itty Mope ¦ Boss-Tones
If Mike likes "La La" by the Cobras he might like this too....LOL
Dean F.
2012-08-13 03:58:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
25 ¦ Hallelujah I Love Her So (undubbed) ¦ Eddie Cochran
It wa amazing to get this without the violins after all these years.
Agreed!!!
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.

I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
86 ¦ Believe What You Say (LP Version) ¦ Ricky Nelson
New on the list, this is the version that features the Jordanaires
backing him up. They recorded their part somewhere else and it was
supposed to be on the single in 1958, but there was a foulup and
Imperial released the single without the Jordanaires part. I like it
better with the group, so I'm not gonna list the single in 1958.
I've never found the version with the Jordanaires on CD. And I have
the Ricky Nelson boxed set!
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
112 ¦ The Battle Of New Orleans ¦ Johnny Horton
113 ¦ By The Light Of The Silvery Moon ¦ Little Richard
115 ¦ I'll Be Satisfied ¦ Jackie Wilson
129 ¦ Rock Crazy Baby ¦ Art Adams
Used to have several hundred copies of this, my friend found the label
owner and we bought most of what she had.
In 2003, I saw Art Adams perform in a church basement in Montreal as
the headliner of a multi-act rockabilly show. (The others were latter-
day RAB groups with comparatively young members.) He performed all
four sides of his two singles and then launched into a medley of Chuck
Berry classics. Turns out, Mr. Adams is quite the fan of Mr. B!
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
143 ¦ My Rifle, My Pony And Me ¦ Dean Martin & Ricky Nelson
Really, Bruce?
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
146 ¦ Music To My Ear ¦ Speck & Doyle
Weird looking (and named) label.
Syrup Bucket?! And not even from Vermont.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
148 ¦ Go, Jimmy, Go ¦ Jimmy Clanton
Always liked this.
Me too.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
Price sang his version on the Huckabee TV show. He's like 80 and still
sounds good.
IMHO, the Mitchell version sounds desiccated compared to the Price
original.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
162 ¦ A Long Vacation ¦ Ricky Nelson
Very good Bo Diddley beat record from an album this year and later on
a single that bubbled under.
Doesn't ring a bell. I'll check the boxed set; maybe it's on there.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
169 ¦ I Only Have Eyes For You ¦ Flamingos
177 ¦ There Goes My Baby ¦ Drifters
Sorry folks, that's as high as I could put these.
Well, at least you included them!
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
172 ¦ My Heart Is An Open Book ¦ Carl Dobkins Jr.
This is awesome in stereo.
I never thought I'd see the word "awesome" used in conjunction with
any recording by Carl Dobkins, Jr.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
181 ¦ Charlie Brown ¦ Coasters
182 ¦ Along Came Jones ¦ Coasters
They were definitely going to be back to back, just had to figure out
in which order.
"Charlie Brown" made my own top 100 of the year, but I left out "Along
Came Jones" in favor of the flip.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
192 ¦ Road Runner ¦ Bo Diddley
Seems to either be from the last week of 1959 or the first week of
1960.
A kick-ass rocker that I ranked pretty high on my 1960 list.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
202 ¦ Turn Me Loose ¦ Fabian
Yes, I like this.....somehow.
It *is* his best record, but that's not saying much.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
216 ¦ I Believe To My Soul ¦ Ray Charles
This is the record where Ray sings all the girls parts himself.
I ranked this one quite a bit higher on my own '59 list (the
horrendous stereo separation notwithstanding).
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
234 ¦ Misty ¦ Johnny Mathis
Sorry, Diane. I like it.
I"m partial to the 1964 remake by the Vibrations.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
246 ¦ Mope-Itty Mope ¦ Boss-Tones
If Mike likes "La La" by the Cobras he might like this too....LOL
I love this one!!!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 04:36:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean F.
"Charlie Brown" made my own top 100 of the year, but I left out "Along
Came Jones" in favor of the flip.
Why did it have to be either or?

Naturally "That Is Rock And Roll" is real high on my list, and it IS
rock and roll, despitre what the Stoller clan says.
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
216 ¦ I Believe To My Soul ¦ Ray Charles
This is the record where Ray sings all the girls parts himself.
I ranked this one quite a bit higher on my own '59 list (the
horrendous stereo separation notwithstanding).
I like that separation. It makes it much easier to tell that it is
actually Ray singing the girls parts.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 04:50:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.

Loading Image...
BobbyM
2012-08-13 05:01:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 05:15:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by BobbyM
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
I don't think Mike would ever say that the Shirelles were not rock and
roll.
BobbyM
2012-08-13 05:23:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by BobbyM
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
I don't think Mike would ever say that the Shirelles were not rock and
roll.
No, I meant the "subsidiary" bit. How about, "The Temprees' version
came out on a subsidiary of Stax."? That would indicate that is part of
Stax. But, was the "We Produce" label owned or merely distributed by
Stax? In the latter, it wouldn't be a subsidiary, would it?
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 05:56:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by BobbyM
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
I don't think Mike would ever say that the Shirelles were not rock and
roll.
No, I meant the "subsidiary" bit.  How about, "The Temprees' version
came out on a subsidiary of Stax."?  That would indicate that is part of
Stax.  But, was the "We Produce" label owned or merely distributed by
Stax?  In the latter, it wouldn't be a subsidiary, would it?
I think they owned it.

No way Mike would see the Temprees version as part of rock and roll.
He doewsn;t even see the Temptations or Bo Diddley as part of rock and
roll.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 15:12:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by BobbyM
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
I don't think Mike would ever say that the Shirelles were not rock and
roll.
No, I meant the "subsidiary" bit.  How about, "The Temprees' version
came out on a subsidiary of Stax."?  That would indicate that is part of
Stax.  But, was the "We Produce" label owned or merely distributed by
Stax?  In the latter, it wouldn't be a subsidiary, would it?
I think they owned it.
No way Mike would see the Temprees version as part of rock and roll.
He doewsn;t even see the Temptations or Bo Diddley as part of rock and
roll.
You're right about me. You're also dancing around Bobby's point: If a
record label released a song through a subsidiary, the implication is
that it's targeted to a smaller, more specified (read "not r'n'r")
market.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 15:42:38 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 11:12 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by BobbyM
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
I don't think Mike would ever say that the Shirelles were not rock and
roll.
No, I meant the "subsidiary" bit.  How about, "The Temprees' version
came out on a subsidiary of Stax."?  That would indicate that is part of
Stax.  But, was the "We Produce" label owned or merely distributed by
Stax?  In the latter, it wouldn't be a subsidiary, would it?
I think they owned it.
No way Mike would see the Temprees version as part of rock and roll.
He doewsn;t even see the Temptations or Bo Diddley as part of rock and
roll.
You're right about me.  You're also dancing around Bobby's point: If a
record label released a song through a subsidiary, the implication is
that it's targeted to a smaller, more specified (read "not r'n'r")
market.
That's not his point at all. When Berry Gordy issued records on Soul
or Tamla is was only because he felt that it might be difficukt to get
airplay on too many rercords on Motown at once.

The Temprees record made the pop charts.

Bobby's point was that if the label is part of Stax that it would
indicate that it was a soul record, whereas if the label was owned by
somebody else but merely "distrubuted" by Stax, it might not
necessarily be a soul record.
x***@gmail.com
2012-08-14 22:02:08 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 Aug 2012 08:12:02 -0700 (PDT), Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by BobbyM
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
I don't think Mike would ever say that the Shirelles were not rock and
roll.
No, I meant the "subsidiary" bit.  How about, "The Temprees' version
came out on a subsidiary of Stax."?  That would indicate that is part of
Stax.  But, was the "We Produce" label owned or merely distributed by
Stax?  In the latter, it wouldn't be a subsidiary, would it?
I think they owned it.
No way Mike would see the Temprees version as part of rock and roll.
He doewsn;t even see the Temptations or Bo Diddley as part of rock and
roll.
You're right about me. You're also dancing around Bobby's point: If a
record label released a song through a subsidiary, the implication is
that it's targeted to a smaller, more specified (read "not r'n'r")
market.
If that is the case how do you explain the following three Motown
labels Motown, Gordy and Tamla that were all recording R&B/Soul Music.
Different labels were established more as a classification means
rather than specifically to target a market.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-15 03:48:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by x***@gmail.com
On Mon, 13 Aug 2012 08:12:02 -0700 (PDT), Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by BobbyM
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Dean F.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs like Aretha later did to Otis Redding on "Respect."
Again, I agree. There's nothing wrong with the Royales' original, but
the Shirelles improved on it.
I also like the 1972 remake by the Temprees on Stax.
It wasn't on Stax, it was on one of their subsidiaries.
Bruce, you should rephrase that; otherwise, you're leaving yourself wide
open to lose that ongoing "soul is rock & roll" debate that you &
Pendragon have. :>)
I don't think Mike would ever say that the Shirelles were not rock and
roll.
No, I meant the "subsidiary" bit.  How about, "The Temprees' version
came out on a subsidiary of Stax."?  That would indicate that is part of
Stax.  But, was the "We Produce" label owned or merely distributed by
Stax?  In the latter, it wouldn't be a subsidiary, would it?
I think they owned it.
No way Mike would see the Temprees version as part of rock and roll.
He doewsn;t even see the Temptations or Bo Diddley as part of rock and
roll.
You're right about me.  You're also dancing around Bobby's point: If a
record label released a song through a subsidiary, the implication is
that it's targeted to a smaller, more specified (read "not r'n'r")
market.
If that is the case how do you explain the following three Motown
labels Motown, Gordy and Tamla that were all recording R&B/Soul Music.
Different labels were established more as a classification means
rather than specifically to target a market.
I couldn't begin to explain anything about Motown (much less its
subsidiaries). I only know 3 things about Motown:

1) Connie Haines recorded some songs for them in the 1960s.
2) Tony Martin recorded some songs for them in the 1960s.
3) Apart from Ms. Haines, Mr. Martin, and any other Classic Pop
singers who might also have recorded there, "Motown" is synonymous
with (pardon my French) "dogshit."
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 04:14:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.

But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.


Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
86 ¦ Believe What You Say (LP Version) ¦ Ricky Nelson
New on the list, this is the version that features the Jordanaires
backing him up. They recorded their part somewhere else and it was
supposed to be on the single in 1958, but there was a foulup and
Imperial released the single without the Jordanaires part. I like it
better with the group, so I'm not gonna list the single in 1958.
I just listened to both versions back to back, and wholeheartedly
agree. Matter of fact, having heard the version with The Jordanaires,
the single version actually sounds incomplete.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
143 ¦ My Rifle, My Pony And Me ¦ Dean Martin & Ricky Nelson
This was featured in the Sopranos episode when Tony is sitting in the
barn with a horse, goat and a dog, from "Rio Bravo" I think.
You think right. It's a great western and a great number.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
You rank Ray Price over Guy Mitchell??? Now that's just plain
blasphemy.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
172 ¦ My Heart Is An Open Book ¦ Carl Dobkins Jr.
This is awesome in stereo.
This was never a favorite of my -- I had it on a various artist album
back in the 80s. Apparently the version I had was a remake, as it had
a slightly faster tempo. I just checked out the stereo version on
youtube, and you're right -- it's a big improvement.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
200 ¦ Sweet Talk ¦ Rusty York
Little known wild rocker that was recorded in 1959 but not issued
until many years later.
It's pretty good ... gets a little repetitive at times, though. I
think it would have benefited if one of the bigger labels had picked
it up and given it a slicker studio arrangement.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
202 ¦ Turn Me Loose ¦ Fabian
Yes, I like this.....somehow.
Glad to hear it. The lyrics are also good if you'd care to make an
exception in your listening practices.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
234 ¦ Misty ¦ Johnny Mathis
Sorry, Diane. I like it.
Me too.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
246 ¦ Mope-Itty Mope ¦ Boss-Tones
If Mike likes "La La" by the Cobras he might like this too....LOL
Thanks for thinking of me, Buddy. Unfortunately, the song just
doesn't work the same magic on me that La-La does. Here's a slightly
more upbeat version that I like better (though it's still got nothing
on La-La):

The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 04:46:43 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me. the lead on the Shirelles is really soulful,
although that's probably a negative for you.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
86 ¦ Believe What You Say (LP Version) ¦ Ricky Nelson
New on the list, this is the version that features the Jordanaires
backing him up. They recorded their part somewhere else and it was
supposed to be on the single in 1958, but there was a foulup and
Imperial released the single without the Jordanaires part. I like it
better with the group, so I'm not gonna list the single in 1958.
I just listened to both versions back to back, and wholeheartedly
agree.  Matter of fact, having heard the version with The Jordanaires,
the single version actually sounds incomplete.
It did to me too the first time I heard it. I had been listening to
the version with the Jordaniares on his Legendary Masters double album
for decades. I was shocked when I discovered that the hit single was
without the Jordanaires. But like I said, it was a mastering error. It
was never supposed to come out without the group.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
143 ¦ My Rifle, My Pony And Me ¦ Dean Martin & Ricky Nelson
This was featured in the Sopranos episode when Tony is sitting in the
barn with a horse, goat and a dog, from "Rio Bravo" I think.
You think right.  It's a great western and a great number.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
You rank Ray Price over Guy Mitchell???  Now that's just plain
blasphemy.
Most people would think the opposite, to rank an over produced pop
cover higher than a country classic by the song's originator higher
would be the blasphemy.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
172 ¦ My Heart Is An Open Book ¦ Carl Dobkins Jr.
This is awesome in stereo.
This was never a favorite of my -- I had it on a various artist album
back in the 80s.  Apparently the version I had was a remake, as it had
a slightly faster tempo.  I just checked out the stereo version on
youtube, and you're right -- it's a big improvement.
I shit the first time I heard it years ago, when the girls came on
real loud in one speaker. Got it way back from Mike Callahan when we
used to trade stereo tapes on reel to reel, about 30 years ago.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
200 ¦ Sweet Talk ¦ Rusty York
Little known wild rocker that was recorded in 1959 but not issued
until many years later.
It's pretty good ... gets a little repetitive at times, though.  I
think it would have benefited if one of the bigger labels had picked
it up and given it a slicker studio arrangement.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
202 ¦ Turn Me Loose ¦ Fabian
Yes, I like this.....somehow.
Glad to hear it.  The lyrics are also good if you'd care to make an
exception in your listening practices.
Nah.

You've got to be the only person on Earth who has ever praised the
lyrics of a Fabian record. Although, it was written by a great
songwriting team.

"Turn Me Loose" is a song written by Doc Pomus and partner, Mort
Shuman, upon the request of the managers of teen idol, Fabian. The
song became Fabian's first hit record, reaching number nine in the
Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1959.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
234 ¦ Misty ¦ Johnny Mathis
Sorry, Diane. I like it.
Me too.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
246 ¦ Mope-Itty Mope ¦ Boss-Tones
If Mike likes "La La" by the Cobras he might like this too....LOL
Thanks for thinking of me, Buddy.  Unfortunately, the song just
doesn't work the same magic on me that La-La does.  Here's a slightly
more upbeat version that I like better (though it's still got nothing
on http://youtu.be/-PHPf2D25Kw
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 15:08:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song. But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal. The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
the lead on the Shirelles is really soulful,
although that's probably a negative for you.
Yes ... although I also like the Shirelles' version.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
86 ¦ Believe What You Say (LP Version) ¦ Ricky Nelson
New on the list, this is the version that features the Jordanaires
backing him up. They recorded their part somewhere else and it was
supposed to be on the single in 1958, but there was a foulup and
Imperial released the single without the Jordanaires part. I like it
better with the group, so I'm not gonna list the single in 1958.
I just listened to both versions back to back, and wholeheartedly
agree.  Matter of fact, having heard the version with The Jordanaires,
the single version actually sounds incomplete.
It did to me too the first time I heard it. I had been listening to
the version with the Jordaniares on his Legendary Masters double album
for decades. I was shocked when I discovered that the hit single was
without the Jordanaires. But like I said, it was a mastering error. It
was never supposed to come out without the group.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
143 ¦ My Rifle, My Pony And Me ¦ Dean Martin & Ricky Nelson
This was featured in the Sopranos episode when Tony is sitting in the
barn with a horse, goat and a dog, from "Rio Bravo" I think.
You think right.  It's a great western and a great number.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
You rank Ray Price over Guy Mitchell???  Now that's just plain
blasphemy.
Most people would think the opposite, to rank an over produced pop
cover higher than a country classic by the song's originator higher
would be the blasphemy.
I thought we didn't care about who wrote a song or recorded it first
-- only about what comes out over the speakers. To me Mr. Mitchell's
version isn't "over produced" at all. The whistling, vocal, and band
all come together to make a song that really is an instant classic
(one that you know is a classic the first moment it you hear it).
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
172 ¦ My Heart Is An Open Book ¦ Carl Dobkins Jr.
This is awesome in stereo.
This was never a favorite of my -- I had it on a various artist album
back in the 80s.  Apparently the version I had was a remake, as it had
a slightly faster tempo.  I just checked out the stereo version on
youtube, and you're right -- it's a big improvement.
I shit the first time I heard it years ago, when the girls came on
real loud in one speaker. Got it way back from Mike Callahan when we
used to trade stereo tapes on reel to reel, about 30 years ago.
Uni will be happy to know that we're both big fans of early stereo.
The songs I grew up with were mostly "re-recorded to simulate stereo"
-- which seemed to mean that sound would come out of both earphones.

When I first started listening to stereo recordings from the late 50s-
early 60s, I was amazed that I could recreate an aural landscape in my
mind, where the horns were on one side, the chorus on the other, and
the singer in the center.

They don't seem to use stereo as boldly in later recordings. I guess
the novelty wore off and tptb felt it was more tasteful if the stereo
didn't call attention to itself.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
200 ¦ Sweet Talk ¦ Rusty York
Little known wild rocker that was recorded in 1959 but not issued
until many years later.
It's pretty good ... gets a little repetitive at times, though.  I
think it would have benefited if one of the bigger labels had picked
it up and given it a slicker studio arrangement.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
202 ¦ Turn Me Loose ¦ Fabian
Yes, I like this.....somehow.
Glad to hear it.  The lyrics are also good if you'd care to make an
exception in your listening practices.
Nah.
You've got to be the only person on Earth who has ever praised the
lyrics of a Fabian record. Although, it was written by a great
songwriting team.
 "Turn Me Loose" is a song written by Doc Pomus and partner, Mort
Shuman, upon the request of the managers of teen idol, Fabian. The
song became Fabian's first hit record, reaching number nine in the
Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1959.
And I'll bet I'm not the only one to praise a Pomus and Shuman song.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
234 ¦ Misty ¦ Johnny Mathis
Sorry, Diane. I like it.
Me too.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
246 ¦ Mope-Itty Mope ¦ Boss-Tones
If Mike likes "La La" by the Cobras he might like this too....LOL
Thanks for thinking of me, Buddy.  Unfortunately, the song just
doesn't work the same magic on me that La-La does.  Here's a slightly
more upbeat version that I like better (though it's still got nothing
on http://youtu.be/-PHPf2D25Kw
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 15:39:18 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness. You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
You rank Ray Price over Guy Mitchell???  Now that's just plain
blasphemy.
Most people would think the opposite, to rank an over produced pop
cover higher than a country classic by the song's originator higher
would be the blasphemy.
I thought we didn't care about who wrote a song or recorded it first
"We" don't, but most people, including a segment of this group, do.
-- only about what comes out over the speakers.  To me Mr. Mitchell's
version isn't "over produced" at all.  The whistling, vocal, and band
all come together to make a song that really is an instant classic
(one that you know is a classic the first moment it you hear it).
I like both of them as you can see by the rankings but I prefer
country fiddles (which are different to violins) to the style of
production that Mitch used in those days. Less is more. But I do much
prefer Guy's version of "Singing The Blues" to the Marty Robbins
original. Speaking of which, I'm dreading updating my 1956 list. I
expect it to be like a top 750 maybe.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 15:47:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?

"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."

It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
159 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Ray Price
244 ¦ Heartaches By The Number ¦ Guy Mitchell
You rank Ray Price over Guy Mitchell???  Now that's just plain
blasphemy.
Most people would think the opposite, to rank an over produced pop
cover higher than a country classic by the song's originator higher
would be the blasphemy.
I thought we didn't care about who wrote a song or recorded it first
"We" don't, but most people, including a segment of this group, do.
-- only about what comes out over the speakers.  To me Mr. Mitchell's
version isn't "over produced" at all.  The whistling, vocal, and band
all come together to make a song that really is an instant classic
(one that you know is a classic the first moment it you hear it).
I like both of them as you can see by the rankings but I prefer
country fiddles (which are different to violins) to the style of
production that Mitch used in those days. Less is more. But I do much
prefer Guy's version of "Singing The Blues" to the Marty Robbins
original. Speaking of which, I'm dreading updating my 1956 list. I
expect it to be like a top 750 maybe.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 16:27:26 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?

If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 17:40:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield. But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 18:58:38 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 1:40 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield.  But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
Where did you get the idea that the man is a soldier and that he is
halfway around the world from the woman?

The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of the
Korean war.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 20:32:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:40 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield.  But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
Where did you get the idea that the man is a soldier and that he is
halfway around the world from the woman?
Regarding the soldier: I wasn't talking about the song. I was talking
about a popular urban legend that is commonly used as an example of
spiritual connection. I see this as being a similar, though extreme,
version of your statement that "If they are far away for awhile
geographically there's no reason that the intensity of their love is
not still there."

Regarding the distance: I was merely using the phrase as a
generalization for "far away."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of the
Korean war.
Not that this would matter. It's not inconceivable that one might a
write war-related song during peacetime.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 23:45:41 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 4:32 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:40 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield.  But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
Where did you get the idea that the man is a soldier and that he is
halfway around the world from the woman?
Regarding the soldier: I wasn't talking about the song.  I was talking
about a popular urban legend that is commonly used as an example of
spiritual connection.  I see this as being a similar, though extreme,
version of your statement that "If they are far away for awhile
geographically there's no reason that the intensity of their love is
not still there."
Regarding the distance: I was merely using the phrase as a
generalization for "far away."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of the
Korean war.
Not that this would matter.  It's not inconceivable that one might a
write war-related song during peacetime.
But much less likely.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-14 02:24:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 4:32 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:40 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield.  But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
Where did you get the idea that the man is a soldier and that he is
halfway around the world from the woman?
Regarding the soldier: I wasn't talking about the song.  I was talking
about a popular urban legend that is commonly used as an example of
spiritual connection.  I see this as being a similar, though extreme,
version of your statement that "If they are far away for awhile
geographically there's no reason that the intensity of their love is
not still there."
Regarding the distance: I was merely using the phrase as a
generalization for "far away."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of the
Korean war.
Not that this would matter.  It's not inconceivable that one might a
write war-related song during peacetime.
But much less likely.
Not really. South Pacific was written in 1949, several years after
the end of WWII.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-14 02:43:45 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 10:24 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 4:32 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:40 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield.  But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
Where did you get the idea that the man is a soldier and that he is
halfway around the world from the woman?
Regarding the soldier: I wasn't talking about the song.  I was talking
about a popular urban legend that is commonly used as an example of
spiritual connection.  I see this as being a similar, though extreme,
version of your statement that "If they are far away for awhile
geographically there's no reason that the intensity of their love is
not still there."
Regarding the distance: I was merely using the phrase as a
generalization for "far away."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of the
Korean war.
Not that this would matter.  It's not inconceivable that one might a
write war-related song during peacetime.
But much less likely.
Not really.  South Pacific was written in 1949, several years after
the end of WWII.
I think there's a big difference between writing an entire play/movie
about an event from the past and writing a singular song about wartime
during peacetime.

Outisde of full movies and plays, can you name a song written about
being away at war that was written several years away from a war?
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-14 04:19:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 10:24 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 4:32 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:40 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield.  But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
Where did you get the idea that the man is a soldier and that he is
halfway around the world from the woman?
Regarding the soldier: I wasn't talking about the song.  I was talking
about a popular urban legend that is commonly used as an example of
spiritual connection.  I see this as being a similar, though extreme,
version of your statement that "If they are far away for awhile
geographically there's no reason that the intensity of their love is
not still there."
Regarding the distance: I was merely using the phrase as a
generalization for "far away."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of the
Korean war.
Not that this would matter.  It's not inconceivable that one might a
write war-related song during peacetime.
But much less likely.
Not really.  South Pacific was written in 1949, several years after
the end of WWII.
I think there's a big difference between writing an entire play/movie
about an event from the past and writing a singular song about wartime
during peacetime.
Outisde of full movies and plays, can you name a song written about
being away at war that was written several years away from a war?
Now you're just stacking the deck against me.

Let's change that to, can I name a song written about being away in
the military that was written during peacetime. Answer: yes. "G.I.
Blues."
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-14 13:09:35 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 14, 12:19 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 10:24 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 4:32 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:40 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:08 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 12:14 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
60 ¦ Dedicated To The One I Love ¦ Shirelles
Better than the Five Royales version IMO. They stole the song away and
made it theirs
Agreed.
But I also think that The Mamas and Papas' version is even better.
too wimpy for me.
It's got a soft feeling to it, as befits a love song.  But the real
attraction for me is the intricate interplay of harmonies of the
vocal.  The M&P's were truly masters of this form.
For me some love songs are more about the intensity of the love that
is felt, rather than the tenderness.  You should understand this, with
the styles of some of your favorites (Laine, Ray) on many of their
love songs. The Mamas & Papas vocal almost sounds like it's a daydream
off in the clouds somewhere.
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
Well, I pay no attention to lyrics, but why would it be a daydream?
If they are far away for awhile geographically there's no reason that
the intensity of their love is not still there. They are not
fantasicing about being together when they are not together. They are
just professing the strength of their love even though they are not
phsically together at that time.
Well I've heard many variations on the story where a soldier and his
bride each dream of making love on the night before he goes to his
death on the battlefield.  But in general, I'd say that praying for a
distant lover is closer to a romantic daydream than to an example of
lovers' souls communing from halfway across the world.
Where did you get the idea that the man is a soldier and that he is
halfway around the world from the woman?
Regarding the soldier: I wasn't talking about the song.  I was talking
about a popular urban legend that is commonly used as an example of
spiritual connection.  I see this as being a similar, though extreme,
version of your statement that "If they are far away for awhile
geographically there's no reason that the intensity of their love is
not still there."
Regarding the distance: I was merely using the phrase as a
generalization for "far away."
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of the
Korean war.
Not that this would matter.  It's not inconceivable that one might a
write war-related song during peacetime.
But much less likely.
Not really.  South Pacific was written in 1949, several years after
the end of WWII.
I think there's a big difference between writing an entire play/movie
about an event from the past and writing a singular song about wartime
during peacetime.
Outisde of full movies and plays, can you name a song written about
being away at war that was written several years away from a war?
Now you're just stacking the deck against me.
Let's change that to, can I name a song written about being away in
the military that was written during peacetime.  Answer: yes.  "G.I.
Blues."
Two more came to me last night: "Navy Blue" and "Soldier Boy."

The latter is on the borderline per your criteria, as it dates from
1962 (only 3 years before the US entered the Vietnam War). Your
stipulation that it had to have been "written several years away from
a war" only leaves me the years 1956-1961.
F R
2012-08-14 03:02:13 UTC
Permalink
Pendragon>
Not really. South Pacific was written in 1949, several years after the
end of WWII.
---------------------
It was not written in '49. It made it's Broadway debut that year but
it's more than likely it was in the works as early as '47 and and surely
by '48. So it could have had it's genisis just 2 years after WW2 ended
Dean F.
2012-08-14 03:22:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by F R
Pendragon>
Not really. South Pacific was written in 1949, several years after the
end of WWII.
---------------------
It was not written in '49. It made it's Broadway debut  that year but
it's more than likely it was in the works as early as '47 and and surely
by '48. So it could have had it's genisis just 2 years after WW2 ended
"Tales of the South Pacific is a Pulitzer Prize-winning book, which is
a collection of sequentially related short stories about World War II,
written by James A. Michener in 1946 and published in 1947. The
stories were based on observations and anecdotes he collected while
stationed as a lieutenant commander in the US Navy on the island of
Espiritu Santo in the New Hebrides Islands (now known as Vanuatu)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tales_of_the_South_Pacific
F R
2012-08-14 03:45:06 UTC
Permalink
Dean>
"Tales of the South Pacific is a Pulitzer Prize-winning book, which is a
collection of sequentially related short stories about World War II,
written by James A. Michener in 1946 and published in 1947. The stories
were based on observations and anecdotes he collected while stationed as
a lieutenant commander in the US Navy on the island of Espiritu Santo in
the New Hebrides Islands (now known as Vanuatu)."
-------------------------
True Dean, but SP made it's debut on Broadway in April of '49 so it was
obviously written at least in '48, if not '47. It was not WRITTEN in '49
as Mike stated.
Dean F.
2012-08-14 04:08:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by F R
True Dean, but SP made it's debut on Broadway in April of '49 so it was
obviously written at least in '48, if not '47. It was not WRITTEN in '49
as Mike stated.
The musical was based on Michener's book, which he wrote in 1946, i.e.
almost immediately after the end of World War Two.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-14 04:10:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by F R
Dean>
"Tales of the South Pacific is a Pulitzer Prize-winning book, which is a
collection of sequentially related short stories about World War II,
written by James A. Michener in 1946 and published in 1947. The stories
were based on observations and anecdotes he collected while stationed as
a lieutenant commander in the US Navy on the island of Espiritu Santo in
the New Hebrides Islands (now known as Vanuatu)."
-------------------------
True Dean, but SP made it's debut on Broadway in April of '49 so it was
obviously written at least in '48, if not '47. It was not WRITTEN in '49
as Mike stated.
I agree. The songs were probably written in 48. I was recycling
Bruce's words to drive home the point:

Bruce: The song was written in 1957, several years after the end of
the Korean war.

Me: Not really. South Pacific was written in 1949, several years
after the end of WWII.

Looks like it didn't come off quite the way I'd planned.

Still a 1948 vintage makes it a good 3 years after the end of WWII --
only one year shy of "Dedicated"'s composition, 4 years after the end
of the Korean War.

*Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with
a soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that
purpose).
F R
2012-08-14 13:02:14 UTC
Permalink
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
SixStringStu
2012-08-14 13:49:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-14 15:09:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations. "My time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you" implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.

I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.

I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely. You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart, Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc. None of these songs mention the war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible. But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die, Sound
Off.)

I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier Boy, and
Navy Blue).

I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service. Was the Korean War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s? Were the patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor? Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time. Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?
SixStringStu
2012-08-14 15:37:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations. "My time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you" implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.

I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.

I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely. You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart, Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc. None of these songs mention the war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible. But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die, Sound
Off.)

I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier Boy, and
Navy Blue).

I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service. Was the Korean War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s? Were the patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor? Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time. Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?

_________________

I have two Korean war Vets in my life. Both are in their 80's and both say
they enlisted while still under age. neither one will talk much about their
experiance, except one who tells me that fish head soup can be mighty tasty
after a few days of not eating in a P.O.W. camp.
That was a very brutal "police action" <<<heavy sarcasm, so the lack of
talking about it certianly is understandable.
F R
2012-08-14 16:52:22 UTC
Permalink
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a
P.O.W. camp.
------------------------
But if that was the case, how did he know his "time's about up"? People
in P.O.W. camps had practically no outside information and what little
incoming mail they may have recieved was surely first read and censored,
no? A prisoner would not know when he might be released.

To me it makes more sense that he was just in the military, but not a
P.O.W. camp.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-14 17:27:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations.  "My time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you" implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.
I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.
I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely.  You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart, Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc.  None of these songs mention the war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible.  But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die, Sound
Off.)
I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier Boy, and
Navy Blue).
I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service.  Was the Korean War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s?  Were the patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor?  Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time.  Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?
_________________
I have two Korean war Vets in my life. Both are in their 80's and both say
they enlisted while still under age. neither one will talk much about their
experiance, except one who tells me that fish head soup can be mighty tasty
after a few days of not eating in a P.O.W. camp.
That was a very brutal "police action" <<<heavy sarcasm, so the lack of
talking about it certianly is understandable.
My father was in the air force during the war, but was stationed in
the Pacific on Johnston Island. Which means his worst war experience
was peeling 1,000s of potatoes when on k.p. Either that or the
relentless boredom of being stationed on what he described as a
blacktopped island the size of a large parking lot.
Sharx35
2012-08-14 23:47:47 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 14, 11:37 am, "SixStringStu"
On Aug 14, 9:49 am, "SixStringStu"
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to
that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a
tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle
Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things
we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll
repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations. "My
time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you"
implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.
I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.
I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs
addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely.
You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart,
Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc. None of these songs mention the
war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible. But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also
sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die,
Sound
Off.)
I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier
Boy, and
Navy Blue).
I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service. Was the Korean
War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s? Were the
patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary
public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor? Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time. Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?
_________________
I have two Korean war Vets in my life. Both are in their 80's
and both say
they enlisted while still under age. neither one will talk much about their
experiance, except one who tells me that fish head soup can be mighty tasty
after a few days of not eating in a P.O.W. camp.
That was a very brutal "police action" <<<heavy sarcasm, so the lack of
talking about it certianly is understandable.
My father was in the air force during the war, but was stationed in
the Pacific on Johnston Island. Which means his worst war
experience
was peeling 1,000s of potatoes when on k.p. Either that or the
relentless boredom of being stationed on what he described as a
blacktopped island the size of a large parking lot.
Personally, I'd rather be bored on Johnson Island rather than
killed on Iwo Jima!!
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-15 03:54:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sharx35
On Aug 14, 11:37 am, "SixStringStu"
On Aug 14, 9:49 am, "SixStringStu"
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll
repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations.  "My time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you"
implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.
I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.
I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs
addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely.
You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart, Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc.  None of these songs mention the war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible.  But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die, Sound
Off.)
I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier Boy, and
Navy Blue).
I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service.  Was the Korean War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s?  Were the
patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor?  Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time.  Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?
_________________
I have two Korean war Vets in my life. Both are in their 80's and both say
they enlisted while still under age. neither one will talk much about their
experiance, except one who tells me that fish head soup can be mighty tasty
after a few days of not eating in a P.O.W. camp.
That was a very brutal "police action" <<<heavy sarcasm, so the lack of
talking about it certianly is understandable.
My father was in the air force during the war, but was stationed in
the Pacific on Johnston Island.  Which means his worst war
experience
was peeling 1,000s of potatoes when on k.p.  Either that or the
relentless boredom of being stationed on what he described as a
blacktopped island the size of a large parking lot.
Personally, I'd rather be bored on Johnson Island rather than
killed on Iwo Jima!!
Well natch! Although Iwo Jima was probably just as safe during the
Korean War.
SixStringStu
2012-08-15 12:58:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations. "My time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you" implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.
I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.
I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely. You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart, Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc. None of these songs mention the war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible. But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die, Sound
Off.)
I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier Boy, and
Navy Blue).
I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service. Was the Korean War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s? Were the patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor? Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time. Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?
_________________
I have two Korean war Vets in my life. Both are in their 80's and both say
they enlisted while still under age. neither one will talk much about
their experiance, except one who tells me that fish head soup can be
mighty tasty after a few days of not eating in a P.O.W. camp.
That was a very brutal "police action" <<<heavy sarcasm, so the lack of
talking about it certianly is understandable.
Is it possible that I have mistaken one song for another?
Was the P.O.W. refernce connected to "I'll be home for Christmas"?
More proof that the broken synaps, caused by a T.B.I., don't always
reconnect properly. :(
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-15 13:27:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by SixStringStu
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations.  "My time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you" implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.
I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.
I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely.  You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart, Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc.  None of these songs mention the war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible.  But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die, Sound
Off.)
I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier Boy, and
Navy Blue).
I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service.  Was the Korean War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s?  Were the patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor?  Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time.  Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?
_________________
I have two Korean war Vets in my life. Both are in their 80's and both say
they enlisted while still under age. neither one will talk much about
their experiance, except one who tells me that fish head soup can be
mighty tasty after a few days of not eating in a P.O.W. camp.
That was a very brutal "police action" <<<heavy sarcasm, so the lack of
talking about it certianly is understandable.
Is it possible that I have mistaken one song for another?
Was the P.O.W. refernce connected to "I'll be home for Christmas"?
More proof that the broken synaps, caused by a T.B.I., don't always
reconnect properly. :(
"I'll Be Home for Christmas" is a WWII era song, and while there's
nothing to verify this in the lyric, it's said to be "sung from the
point of view of an overseas soldier during WWII, writing a letter to
his family." (Wikipedia)

I've never heard that one connected with a P.O.W. camp either,
although it also lends itself to such a reading.
SixStringStu
2012-08-15 18:01:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by SixStringStu
Post by SixStringStu
Post by F R
Again, this is not to imply that "Dedicated" has anything to do with a
soldier or a war (although it could easily lend itself to that purpose).
------------------------------
Speaking of soldiers at war, how about the lyrics of "Ill Be Home"? It
sounds like (very slightly), the guy is in prison
as opposed to being at war. Twice the lyric says their love will be
free, which implies serving a prison term as opposed to a tour of duty
in the military. But, when I was serving active duty in the late 60s, we
spoke of "freedom".... finishing our commitment to Uncle Sam.
Is being in prison a topic a young teen-ager could identify with?
--------------------------------
I'll be home my darling, Please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together; once more our love will be free
At the corner drug store each Saturday we would meet
I'd walk you home, in the moonlight, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling as I write this letter, here's hoping you're thinking of me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, all of these things we'll repeat
So darling, as I write this letter, here's hoping you're
Thinking about me
My times about up, so long until I'll be home to start
Serving you
I'll be home my darling, please wait there for me
We'll stroll along together, our love, will, be free.
I was told many years ago that the 1st person in the song was in a P.O.W.
camp.
It seems to work equally well with both interpretations. "My time's
about up, so long until I'll be home to start serving you" implies
that he's currently serving time of some sort.
I agree with Frank's observation that teens would be more likely to
identify with serving time in the military (the draft was still in
effect), than in prison.
I've also noticed that many of the Korean War era songs addressed the
topic of wartime separation (intentionally or not) obliquely. You
Belong to Me, Wish You Were Here, Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart, Till I
Waltz Again With You, Vaya Con Dios, Have You Heard, Don't Let the
Stars Get in You Eyes, etc. None of these songs mention the war, and
the exotic settings of some (Vaya Con Dios, Auf Wiederseh'n, You
Belong to Me) geographically remove them about as far from Korea as
possible. But one can feel an added level of poignancy in them when
taking the war into account.
(The few Korean War era songs that have a military theme also sidestep
the issue of the war: Now Hear This, Old Soldiers Never Die, Sound
Off.)
I'll Be Home is much more clear about the forced nature of the
separation than any of the above (as are G.I. Blues, Soldier Boy, and
Navy Blue).
I find it interesting that the Korean War era songs would avoid the
topic of the war, whereas several peacetime songs from the late 50s/
early 60s actually focus on military service. Was the Korean War
something of a taboo subject in the early 50s? Were the patriotic
songs of WWII now considered "hokey" by a cynical, war weary public?
Was the specter of the atom bomb a factor? Otoh, war films and war
novels were popular at this time. Perhaps music was looked on as a
form of escapism?
_________________
I have two Korean war Vets in my life. Both are in their 80's and both say
they enlisted while still under age. neither one will talk much about
their experiance, except one who tells me that fish head soup can be
mighty tasty after a few days of not eating in a P.O.W. camp.
That was a very brutal "police action" <<<heavy sarcasm, so the lack of
talking about it certianly is understandable.
Is it possible that I have mistaken one song for another?
Was the P.O.W. refernce connected to "I'll be home for Christmas"?
More proof that the broken synaps, caused by a T.B.I., don't always
reconnect properly. :(
"I'll Be Home for Christmas" is a WWII era song, and while there's
nothing to verify this in the lyric, it's said to be "sung from the
point of view of an overseas soldier during WWII, writing a letter to
his family." (Wikipedia)

I've never heard that one connected with a P.O.W. camp either,
although it also lends itself to such a reading.

_____________________

Damn this damaged brain, I wish I could recall where I was and who was
telling me this. It could've been an interview I watched OR it could've been
a fellow artist.
Cest le vie 4 me. :-(
F R
2012-08-16 01:13:08 UTC
Permalink
"I'll Be Home for Christmas" is a WWII era song, and while there's
nothing to verify this in the lyric, it's said to be "sung from the
point of view of an overseas soldier during WWII, writing a letter to
his family." (Wikipedia)
---------------
But the last line of the song, after the final time he sings "I'll be
home for Christmas"..... is...
"But only on my dreams."
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-16 04:41:18 UTC
Permalink
 "I'll Be Home for Christmas" is a WWII era song, and while there's
nothing to verify this in the lyric, it's said to be "sung from the
point of view of an overseas soldier during WWII, writing a letter to
his family." (Wikipedia)
---------------
But the last line of the song, after the final time he sings "I'll be
home for Christmas"..... is...
"But only on my dreams."
"If only in my dreams," as I recall.

Since I learned the song from the radio in the 1960s (during the
holiday season), I didn't associate it with WWII until much later.
I'd always taken this to mean he that he'll be home in spirit, even if
other circumstances keep him from returning.

From a soldier's p.o.v., he's implying that he doubts the war will be
over by then ... or perhaps he fears that he'll be wounded or killed
in battle ... or he could be/end up a p.o.w.

One of the things that's made it such a lasting Christmas staple is
that its message is universal. It applies to everyone who wants to
return to their family/home/Christmases past -- and especially to
those who can't return for whatever reasons.

I'll never be going home for Christmas, as my family is gone and the
house I grew up in belongs to strangers. But I can still return there
in my memories. And I think it applies to just about everybody in all
walks of life and circumstances. Even non-Christians need only
substitute Chanukah or Kwanzaa or Yule to make the identification more
personal.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-16 05:29:49 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 16, 12:41 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
 "I'll Be Home for Christmas" is a WWII era song, and while there's
nothing to verify this in the lyric, it's said to be "sung from the
point of view of an overseas soldier during WWII, writing a letter to
his family." (Wikipedia)
---------------
But the last line of the song, after the final time he sings "I'll be
home for Christmas"..... is...
"But only on my dreams."
"If only in my dreams," as I recall.
Since I learned the song from the radio in the 1960s (during the
holiday season), I didn't associate it with WWII until much later.
I'd always taken this to mean he that he'll be home in spirit, even if
other circumstances keep him from returning.
From a soldier's p.o.v., he's implying that he doubts the war will be
over by then ... or perhaps he fears that he'll be wounded or killed
in battle ... or he could be/end up a p.o.w.
One of the things that's made it such a lasting Christmas staple is
that its message is universal.  It applies to everyone who wants to
return to their family/home/Christmases past -- and especially to
those who can't return for whatever reasons.
I'll never be going home for Christmas, as my family is gone and the
house I grew up in belongs to strangers.
You're old. Bing was only 39 or 42 when he sang it (there's a dispute
on his birth year, 01 or 04).
Post by Michael Pendragon
But I can still return there
in my memories.  And I think it applies to just about everybody in all
walks of life and circumstances.  Even non-Christians need only
substitute Chanukah or Kwanzaa or Yule to make the identification more
personal.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-16 13:18:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 16, 12:41 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
 "I'll Be Home for Christmas" is a WWII era song, and while there's
nothing to verify this in the lyric, it's said to be "sung from the
point of view of an overseas soldier during WWII, writing a letter to
his family." (Wikipedia)
---------------
But the last line of the song, after the final time he sings "I'll be
home for Christmas"..... is...
"But only on my dreams."
"If only in my dreams," as I recall.
Since I learned the song from the radio in the 1960s (during the
holiday season), I didn't associate it with WWII until much later.
I'd always taken this to mean he that he'll be home in spirit, even if
other circumstances keep him from returning.
From a soldier's p.o.v., he's implying that he doubts the war will be
over by then ... or perhaps he fears that he'll be wounded or killed
in battle ... or he could be/end up a p.o.w.
One of the things that's made it such a lasting Christmas staple is
that its message is universal.  It applies to everyone who wants to
return to their family/home/Christmases past -- and especially to
those who can't return for whatever reasons.
I'll never be going home for Christmas, as my family is gone and the
house I grew up in belongs to strangers.
You're old. Bing was only 39 or 42 when he sang it (there's a dispute
on his birth year, 01 or 04).
Age has nothing to do with it. It's been that way since I was 23.
Way Back Jack
2012-08-16 00:56:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by SixStringStu
Is it possible that I have mistaken one song for another?
Was the P.O.W. refernce connected to "I'll be home for Christmas"?
More proof that the broken synaps, caused by a T.B.I., don't always
reconnect properly. :(
Those broken synapses were caused by the stupidity of a shit-for-brains
moron by the name of James Stuart Hodges (aka SixStringStu) who got the
crap beaten out of him because he though that he was Rambo and decided to
single-handedly take on a gang of rival drug dealers. Now this criminal,
pathological liar, self-proclaimed sociopath and societal parasite gets a
monthly governmental handout compliments of the the American taxpayer for
doing absolutely nothing other than sitting on his ass and entertaining
himself on the UseNet.


James Stuart Hodges, aka SixStringStu, is a life-long societal parasite,
a Christian hypocrite, a pathological liar and a self-proclaimed
sociopath who has a long criminal record and several felony arrests, one
of which got him locked up by the Feds in a loony bin. Loony-bin boy
also fathered a child who was murdered because the woman who he
impregnated didn't want to spend the best years of her life rasing the
illegitimate child of a criminal freak.

James Stuart Hodges
1442 SW Haygood Loop
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 438-8968
http://tinyurl.com/6tbq5ap


At age 50, loony-bin boy searched every flop house, whore house, out
house, dog house and trailer park on the east coast, and found his
perfect bride.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/***@N08/?saved=1
http://s1120.photobucket.com/albums/l487/wesolouseki/
http://www.facebook.com/people/Suzanne-Roberta-Hodges/100001276048983
Isn't she classy?
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 16:32:34 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
It was intended by the songwriter to be sung emotionally like the
Shirelles version was. The evidence is that the songwriter's group,
the Five Royales, sang their version in that style.


Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 17:44:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
It was intended by the songwriter to be sung emotionally like the
Shirelles version was. The evidence is that the songwriter's group,
the Five Royales, sang their version in that style.
http://youtu.be/zAuRMFzBCqw
Many singers interpret songs differently from the writer's intent.
Songwriter Churchill Kohlman was supposedly unhappy with Johnnie Ray's
interpretation of "Cry," yet it's Mr. Ray's interpretation that
defines the song.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 18:00:48 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 1:44 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
It was intended by the songwriter to be sung emotionally like the
Shirelles version was. The evidence is that the songwriter's group,
the Five Royales, sang their version in that style.
http://youtu.be/zAuRMFzBCqw
Many singers interpret songs differently from the writer's intent.
Songwriter Churchill Kohlman was supposedly unhappy with Johnnie Ray's
interpretation of "Cry," yet it's Mr. Ray's interpretation that
defines the song.
That's different than when the songwriter is himself a recording
artist. A non-artist songwriter cannot really interpret the song.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 18:11:08 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 1:44 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
It was intended by the songwriter to be sung emotionally like the
Shirelles version was. The evidence is that the songwriter's group,
the Five Royales, sang their version in that style.
http://youtu.be/zAuRMFzBCqw
Many singers interpret songs differently from the writer's intent.
Songwriter Churchill Kohlman was supposedly unhappy with Johnnie Ray's
interpretation of "Cry," yet it's Mr. Ray's interpretation that
defines the song.
Also, the Mamas & Papas sing the song as an ensemble rather than as
one distinct lead singer as the person in the story. To me this is
turning a very personal story of one person singing to his/her lover
into some kind of hokey production number.

Other than the opening. The group sings the lyrics in unison,
alternating at times between the men and the women singing lines or
parts of lines.

In the Shirelles version, essentially only the lead singer sings the
lyrics. The rest of the group just sings harmony. They never sing the
lyrics except for a little part of the chorus when they alternate
lines with the lead, because it's just the one person's personal
story.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 19:02:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:44 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
It was intended by the songwriter to be sung emotionally like the
Shirelles version was. The evidence is that the songwriter's group,
the Five Royales, sang their version in that style.
http://youtu.be/zAuRMFzBCqw
Many singers interpret songs differently from the writer's intent.
Songwriter Churchill Kohlman was supposedly unhappy with Johnnie Ray's
interpretation of "Cry," yet it's Mr. Ray's interpretation that
defines the song.
Also, the Mamas & Papas sing the song as an ensemble rather than as
one distinct lead singer as the person in the story. To me this is
turning a very personal story of one person singing to his/her lover
into some kind of hokey production number.
I wouldn't equate group harmony with a production number.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
Other than the opening. The group sings the lyrics in unison,
alternating at times between the men and the women singing lines or
parts of lines.
In the Shirelles version, essentially only the lead singer sings the
lyrics. The rest of the group just sings harmony. They never sing the
lyrics except for a little part of the chorus when they alternate
lines with the lead, because it's just the one person's personal
story.
Yes The Shirelle's version is presented in a straightforward manner as
a girl singing to the memory of her far away lover. It works ... well
enough to make their version universally acknowledged as the
definitive one.

With the M&Ps' version, you can look at it from several p.o.v.s. The
straightforward one would be that two pairs of lovers are serenading
one another over distance; but one can also say that the male vocals
represent one male; the females, one female. Or we can just look at
the vocal as being of a universal nature.

If I were including the number in a musical score, I'd probably go
with the single lead vocalist approach.

But then I'm just listening to what's coming out of the speakers, and
"suspending my disbelief" so to speak as regards the number of
singers. Anyway, the concept of a lovelorn girl serenading her long
distance lover via a bedtime prayer *with several of her girlfriends
singing backup* is equally absurd.

So for me, it's The M&Ps' version.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 18:46:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:44 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
It was intended by the songwriter to be sung emotionally like the
Shirelles version was. The evidence is that the songwriter's group,
the Five Royales, sang their version in that style.
http://youtu.be/zAuRMFzBCqw
Many singers interpret songs differently from the writer's intent.
Songwriter Churchill Kohlman was supposedly unhappy with Johnnie Ray's
interpretation of "Cry," yet it's Mr. Ray's interpretation that
defines the song.
That's different than when the songwriter is himself a recording
artist. A non-artist songwriter cannot really interpret the song.
Not really. A singer-songwriter can be just as mistaken as a
songwriter. After all, we both agree that The Shirelles' version is
better than the original.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 19:08:40 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 2:46 pm, Michael Pendragon
Not really.  A singer-songwriter can be just as mistaken as a
songwriter.  After all, we both agree that The Shirelles' version is
better than the original.
For me it's only marginally better (both versions get an "8* for
excellent, the M&P gets a "5" for pretty good) but it has nothing to
do with the interpretation. The Shirelles version is almost an exact
copy of the 5 Royales arrangement. I just prefer theirs slightly
because I think the lead singer there sells it better. I can feel more
"lomging for the lover" in her voice.
Michael Pendragon
2012-08-13 20:34:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 2:46 pm, Michael Pendragon
Not really.  A singer-songwriter can be just as mistaken as a
songwriter.  After all, we both agree that The Shirelles' version is
better than the original.
For me it's only marginally better (both versions get an "8* for
excellent, the M&P gets a "5" for pretty good) but it has nothing to
do with the interpretation. The Shirelles version is almost an exact
copy of the 5 Royales arrangement. I just prefer theirs slightly
because I think the lead singer there sells it better. I can feel more
"lomging for the lover" in her voice.
The greater emotional intensity of the longing would constitute a
different interpretation.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 23:45:05 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 4:34 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 2:46 pm, Michael Pendragon
Not really.  A singer-songwriter can be just as mistaken as a
songwriter.  After all, we both agree that The Shirelles' version is
better than the original.
For me it's only marginally better (both versions get an "8* for
excellent, the M&P gets a "5" for pretty good) but it has nothing to
do with the interpretation. The Shirelles version is almost an exact
copy of the 5 Royales arrangement. I just prefer theirs slightly
because I think the lead singer there sells it better. I can feel more
"lomging for the lover" in her voice.
The greater emotional intensity of the longing would constitute a
different interpretation.
No, I think both the 5 Royales and the Shirelles were intending to
have a more intense delivery by the lead, It's just the it was
executed more convincingly by the Shirelles lead IMO.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 23:55:28 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 2:46 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 1:44 pm, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
On Aug 13, 11:47 am, Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Isn't a sort of daydream?
"Each night before you go to bed, my baby/Whisper a little prayer for
me, my baby/And tell all the stars above/This is dedicated to the one
I love."
It's an idealized longing for a lover who's far away.
It was intended by the songwriter to be sung emotionally like the
Shirelles version was. The evidence is that the songwriter's group,
the Five Royales, sang their version in that style.
http://youtu.be/zAuRMFzBCqw
Many singers interpret songs differently from the writer's intent.
Songwriter Churchill Kohlman was supposedly unhappy with Johnnie Ray's
interpretation of "Cry," yet it's Mr. Ray's interpretation that
defines the song.
That's different than when the songwriter is himself a recording
artist. A non-artist songwriter cannot really interpret the song.
Not really.  A singer-songwriter can be just as mistaken as a
songwriter.
While I don't agree in THIS case, I certainly agree with the general
point you're making. For instance, I think Chuck Berry misfired by
recording his version of "Memphis" as a lower tempo sort of bouncer
rather than as a rocker the way Johhny Rivers did it. Even Chuck
acknowledges that Johnny's version is THE version.
Steve Mc
2012-08-14 11:54:33 UTC
Permalink
86 Š Believe What You Say (LP Version) Š Ricky Nelson
New on the list, this is the version that features the Jordanaires
backing him up. They recorded their part somewhere else and it was
supposed to be on the single in 1958, but there was a foulup and
Imperial released the single without the Jordanaires part. I like it
better with the group, so I'm not gonna list the single in 1958.



One of my favorite Ricky's, but have never heard the LP version, so I went a
searchin'. Interesting additions. Thanks for the turn on buddy.
--
Steve Mc

DNA to SBC to respond
carl
2012-08-13 05:24:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
It's gonna take much longer for me to revise and expand my yearly
lists from the 50s, but I have 1959 done. It came out exactly to a top
250.
1 ¦ You're So Fine ¦ Falcons
2 ¦ Dead Man's Stroll ¦ Revels
3 ¦ What'd I Say ¦ Ray Charles
4 ¦ Rooster Blues ¦ Lightnin' Slim
5 ¦ I Know It's Hard But It's Fair ¦ Five Royales
6 ¦ Let The Good Times Roll ¦ Ray Charles
7 ¦ There You Go ¦ Clyde McPhatter (Drifters)
8 ¦ Be My Guest ¦ Fats Domino
9 ¦ Beyond The Sea ¦ Bobby Darin
10 ¦ A Big Hunk O' Love ¦ Elvis Presley
My top 250, it's getting a lot harder to keep to 200. Lot more pop on top I'm afraid. This is the year I started listening to the radio, and I have good memories of a lot of what was popular.

1 Bobby Darin - Mack The Knife - Atco 6147
2 Ricky Nelson - It's Late - Imperial 5565
3 The Everly Brothers - ('Til) I Kissed You - Cadence 1369
4 Wilbert Harrison - Kansas City - Fury 1023
5 Fabian - Turn Me Loose - Chancellor 1033
6 Freddy Cannon - Tallahassee Lassie - Swan 4031
7 The Viscounts - Harlem Nocturne - Madison 123
8 The Impalas - Sorry (I Ran All The Way Home) - Cub 9022
9 Freddy Cannon - Way Down Yonder In New Orleans - Swan 4043
10 Ray Smith - Rockin' Little Angel - Judd 1016
11 Ronnie Hawkins - Mary Lou - Roulette 4177
12 Lloyd Price - Personality - ABC-Paramount 10018
13 Eddie Cochran - Somethin' Else - Liberty 55203
14 Paul Anka - Put Your Head On My Shoulder - ABC-Paramount 10040
15 Chuck Berry - Memphis Tennessee - Chess 1729
16 Ronnie Hawkins - Forty Days - Roulette 4154
17 Ray Sharpe - Linda Lu - Jamie 1128
18 Conway Twitty - Lonely Blue Boy - MGM 12857
19 Ray Charles - Don't Let The Sun Catch You Cryin' - Atlantic 2047
20 Ricky Nelson - Just A Little Too Much - Imperial 5595
21 The Shirelles - Dedicated To The One I Love - Scepter 1203
22 Jimmy Reed - Take Out Some Insurance - Vee-Jay 314
23 Duane Eddy - Three-30-Blues - Jamie 1122
24 The Crests - Six Nights A Week - Coed 509
25 Buddy Holly - Peggy Sue Got Married - Coral 62134
26 The Wailers - Tall Cool One - Golden Crest 518
27 The Drifters - There Goes My Baby - Atlantic 2025
28 Carl Mann - Mona Lisa - Phillips International 3539
29 Dion & The Belmonts - Where Or When - Laurie 3044
30 Johnnie Allan & The Krazy Kats - Lonely Days And Lonely Nights - Jin 111
31 Duane Eddy - Moovin' N' Groovin' - Jamie 1101
32 Lloyd Price - Won'tcha Come Home - ABC Paramount 10062
33 Bo Diddley - I'm Sorry - Checker 914
34 Johnny & The Hurricanes - Lazy - Warwick 502
35 The Four Preps - Down By the Station - Capitol 4312
36 Lavern Baker - So High So Low - Atlantic 2033
37 The Flamingos - I Only Have Eyes For You - End 1046
38 Hank Ballard & The Midnighters - Look At Little Sister - King 5289
39 Jimmy Reed - Baby What You Want Me To Do - Vee-Jay 333
40 Johnny Adams - I Won't Cry - Ric 961
41 Jivin' Gene & The Jokers - Breaking Up Is Hard To Do - Jin 116
42 Brenda Lee - Sweet Nothin's - Decca 30967
43 Duane Eddy - Bonnie Came Back - Jamie 1144
44 Nina Simone - Little Girl Blue - Bethlehem 11052
45 Marty Robbins - El Paso - Columbia 41511
46 Chuck Berry - Little Queenie - Chess 1722
47 Charlie Ryan & The Timberline Riders - Hot Rod Lincoln - 4 Star 1733
48 Screamin' Joe Neal - Rock 'n' Roll Deacon - Shippings 13229
49 Elvis Presley - (Now And Then There's) A Fool Such As I - RCA 47-7506
50 The Crests - The Angels Listened In - Coed 515
51 Fabian - Tiger - Chancellor 1037
52 Lloyd Price - Have You Ever Had The Blues - ABC-Paramount 10018
53 Lonesome Lee - Lonely Travelin' - Bandera 2501
54 Connie Francis - Frankie - MGM 12793
55 Jesse Belvin - Guess Who - RCA 47-7469
56 Nina Simone - Chilly Winds Don't Blow - Colpix 116
57 The Falcons - You're So Fine - Flick 001
58 Buddy Holly - Raining In My Heart - Coral 62074
59 Patsy Cline - Gotta Lot Of Rhythm In My Soul - Decca 30929
60 Buddy Holly - It Doesn't Matter Anymore - Coral 62074
61 The Derbys - Night After Night - Mercury 71437
62 The Clovers - Love Potion No 9 - United Artists 180
63 Jackie Wilson - That's Why - Brunswick 55121
64 Buster Brown - Fannie Mae - Fire 1008
65 Tommy Edwards - The Morning Side Of The Mountain - M-G-M 12757
66 Buddy Holly - Crying Waiting Hoping - Coral 62134
67 Ray Charles - What'd I Say - Atlantic 2031
68 The Everly Brothers - Since You Broke My Heart - Cadence 1376
69 Hank Ballard & The Midnighters - Sugaree - King 5215
70 Bobby Darin - Dream Lover - Atco 6140
71 Jack Scott - The Way I Walk - Carlton 514
72 Lavern Baker - I Waited Too Long - Atlantic 2021
73 The Knockouts - Darling Lorraine - Shad 5013
74 Brenda Lee - Weep No More My Baby - Decca 30967
75 The Drifters - (If You Cry) True Love True Love - Atlantic 2040
76 Johnny Adams & The Gondoliers - Come On - Ric 963
77 Phil Phillips & The Twilights - Sea Of Love - Khoury's 711
78 The Coasters - Charlie Brown - Atco 6132
79 The Rock-A-Teens - Woo-Hoo - Doran 3515
80 Fats Domino - I Want To Walk You Home - Imperial 5606
81 Jimmy McCracklin - The Wobble - Mercury 71412
82 Lonesome Sundown - I'm Gonna Stick To You Baby - Excello 2163
83 The Coasters - Run Red Run - Atco 6153
84 Elvis Presley - A Big Hunk O' Love - RCA 47-7600
85 Miss Toni Fisher - The Big Hurt - Signet 275
86 The Channels - Bye Bye Baby - Fury 1021
87 Jimmy Jones - Handy Man - Cub 9049
88 Brenda Lee - Bill Bailey Won't You Please Come Home - Decca 30806
89 The Strangers - A Lost Soul - Titan 1702
90 Lloyd Price - I'm Gonna Get Married - ABC-Paramount 10032
91 Billy Lee Riley - Down By The Riverside - Sun 313
92 Nina Simone - I Loves You Porgy - Bethlehem 11021
93 Duane Eddy - Yep! - Jamie 1122
94 Don & Dewey - Farmer John - Specialty 659
95 Lazy Lester - I Hear You Knockin' - Excello 2155
96 The Passions - Just To Be With You - Audicon 102
97 Preston Epps - Bongo Rock - Original Sound 4
98 The Arcades - Fine Little Girl - Johnson 320
99 The Fleetwoods - Mr Blue - Dolton 5
100 Johnny Preston - Running Bear - Mercury 71474
101 Slim Harpo - Late Last Night - Excello 2171
102 The Skyliners - This I Swear - Calico 106
103 Johnny Powers & The Chris Casello Trio - With Your Love With Your Kiss - Sun 327
104 The Fireballs - Torquay - Top Rank 2008
105 Chuck Berry - Almost Grown - Chess 1722
106 Sam Cooke - Everybody Loves To Cha Cha Cha - Keen 2018
107 The Fireballs - Bulldog - Top Rank 2026
108 Santo & Johnny - Sleep Walk - Canadian-American 10
109 Jackie Wilson - You Better Know It - Brunswick 55149
110 Larry Williams - Bad Boy - Specialty 658
111 Paul Anka - It's Time To Cry - ABC-Paramount 10064
112 Bobby Rydell - We Got Love - Cameo 169
113 Jackie Wilson - Talk That Talk - Brunswick 55165
114 Ray Charles - Let The Good Times Roll - Atlantic 2047
115 Jackie Wilson - I'll Be Satisfied - Brunswick 55136
116 Sandy Nelson - Teen Beat - Original Sound 5
117 The Skyliners - Lonely Way - Calico 109
118 Tarheel Slim & Little Ann - Lock Me In Your Heart - Fire 1009
119 Frank Sinatra - High Hopes - Capitol 4214
120 Mark Dinning - Teen Angel - M-G-M 12845
121 Bobby Rydell - Kissin' Time - Cameo 167
122 Connie Francis - Lipstick On Your Collar - MGM 12793
123 Marv Johnson - You Got What It Takes - United Artists 185
124 The Wailers - Mau Mau - Golden Crest 591
125 The Drifters - Dance With Me - Atlantic 2040
126 The Coasters - Along Came Jones - Atco 6141
127 Jeujene & The Jaybops - Thunderin' Guitar - Zero 7-3279
128 Tommy Edwards - Please Mr Sun - M-G-M 12757
129 Huey 'Piano' Smith And His Clowns - Tu-Ber-Cu-Lucas And The Sinus Blues - Ace 571
130 Connie Francis - Among My Souvenirs - MGM 12841
131 Johnny & The Hurricanes - Buckeye - Warwick 509
132 Jimmy Clanton - Go Jimmy Go - Ace 575
133 Irma Thomas - Don't Mess With My Man - Ron 328
134 Elvis Presley - My Wish Came True - RCA 47-7600
135 The Skyliners - It Happened Today - Calico 109
136 Hank Ballard & The Midnighters - Never Knew - King 5275
137 Frankie Avalon - Venus - Chancellor 1031
138 Freddy Cannon - You Know - Swan 4031
139 Jerry Lee Lewis - Big Blon' Baby - Sun 317
140 Neil Sedaka - Oh! Carol - RCA 47-7595
141 Jeujene & The Jaybops - Arroongah - Zero 7-3279
142 Roy Orbison - Uptown - Monument 412
143 Hank Ballard & The Midnighters - I'll Keep You Happy - King 5195
144 Barrett Strong - Money (That's What I Want) - Anna 1111
145 George Jones - White Lightning - Mercury 71406
146 Johnny Cash - Luther Played The Boogie - Sun 316
147 The Monotones - Fools Will Be Fools - Argo 5339
148 The King Crooners - Won't You Let Me Know - Excello 2168
149 Lightnin' Slim - Rooster Blues - Excello 2169
150 Bobby Blue Bland - I Lost Sight On The World - Duke 300
151 Duane Eddy - Forty Miles Of Bad Road - Jamie 1126
152 The King Crooners - Now That She's Gone - Excello 2168
153 The Strangers - Hill Stomp - Titan 1702
154 Cookie & The Cupcakes - Close Up the Back Door - Judd 1015
155 The Everly Brothers - Oh What A Feeling - Cadence 1369
156 The Fleetwoods - Come Softly To Me - Dolphin 1
157 Ron Holden - Love You So - Nite Owl 10
158 Dave 'Baby' Cortez - The Happy Organ - Clock 1009
159 The Rockin' Saints - Cheat On Me Baby - Decca 31144
160 The Royal Teens - Believe Me - Capitol 4261
161 Harold Dorman - Mountain Of Love - Rita 1003
162 Big Jay McNeely - There Is Something On Your Mind - Swingin' 614
163 Dee Clark - Hey Little Girl - Abner 1029
164 Christine Kittrell - I'm Just What You're Looking For - Champion 1005
165 Jerry Lee Lewis - Lovin' Up A Storm - Sun 317
166 The Harptones - Laughing On The Outside - Warwick 500
167 Ray Charles - I Believe To My Soul - Atlantic 2043
168 The Capers - Candy Store Blues - Vee-Jay 315
169 Wilbert Harrison - Cheating Baby - Fury 1027
170 Larry Williams - She Said Yeah - Specialty 658
171 Slim Harpo - Buzz Me Babe - Excello 2171
172 Sheriff & The Ravels - The Lonely One - Vee-Jay 306
173 The Eternals - Babalu's Wedding Day - Hollywood 70
174 The Isley Brothers - Shout - RCA 47-7588
175 Jerry McGill & The Topcoats - Lovestruck - Sun 326
176 Little Milton - I'm Tryin' - Bobbin 112
177 The Desires - Let It Please Be You - Hull 730
178 Connie Francis - You're Gonna Miss Me - MGM 12824
179 Bobby & Terry Caraway & The Rockets - Ballin' Keen - Crest 1065
180 Chuck Berry - Back In The USA - Chess 1729
181 Link Wray & The Wraymen - Slinky - Epic 5-9343
182 Dion & The Belmonts - Every Little Thing I Do - Laurie 3035
183 The Coasters - Three Cool Cats - Atco 6132
184 Eddie Cochran - Little Angel - Liberty 55217
185 John Lee Hooker - Maudie - Vee-Jay 308
186 The Crickets - When You Ask About Love - Brunswick 55153
187 The Eternals - Rockin' In The Jungle - Hollywood 68
188 James Brown & The Famous Flames - It Hurts To Tell You - Federal 12352
189 The Coasters - I'm A Hog For You - Atco 6146
190 Johnny Burnette - Sweet Baby Doll - Freedom 44017
191 The Dells - Dry Your Eyes - Vee-Jay 324
192 The Fireflies - You Were Mine - Ribbon 6901
193 The Coasters - That Is Rock And Roll - Atco 6141
194 Fats Domino - When The Saints Go Marching In - Imperial 5569
195 Al Chase & The Midnighters - Lubby Lou - Jin 118
196 Bo Diddley - Say Man - Checker 931
197 The Bobbettes - You Are My Sweetheart - Atlantic 2027
198 The Moonbeems - Cryin' The Blues - Sapphire 2250
199 The Everly Brothers - Poor Jenny - Cadence 1364
200 The Kingston Trio - MTA - Capitol 4221
201 Johnny & The Hurricanes - Red River Rock - Warwick 509
202 Otis Rush - Double Trouble - Cobra 5030
203 Jackie Lee Cochran - Georgia Lee Brown - Jaguar 3031
204 The Flamingos - But Not For Me - End 1040
205 Connie Francis - If I Didn't Care - MGM 12769
206 The Channels - My Love Will Never Die - Fury 1021
207 The Lyrics - Oh Please Love Me - Coral 62322
208 The Vocaleers - I Need Your Love So Bad - Paradise 113
209 The Youngtones - Can I Come Over - X-Tra 120
210 The Olympics - (Baby) Hully Gully - Arvee 562
211 The Altairs - If You Love Me - Amy 803
212 Fenton Robinson - As The Years Go Passing By - Duke 312
213 James Brown & The Famous Flames - There Must Be A Reason - Federal 12348
214 Professor Longhair - Everyday Everynight - Ron 329
215 Bo Diddley - Oh Yeah - Checker 914
216 The Vocaleers - Have You Ever Loved Someone - Paradise 113
217 Johnny Cash - Five Feet High And Rising - Columbia 41427
218 Dion & The Belmonts - A Teenager In Love - Laurie 3027
219 The Crests - Molly Mae - Coed 511
220 Chuck Berry - Anthony Boy - Chess 1716
221 The Mystics - Hushabye - Laurie 3028
222 The Dee Cals - Stars In The Blue What Should I Do - Co-ed 1960
223 Professor Longhair - Go To The Mardi Gras - Ron 329
224 The Strangers - Caterpillar Crawl - Titan 1701
225 Paul Anka - Lonely Boy - ABC-Paramount 10022
226 Johnny Mathis - Misty - Columbia 41483
227 The Coasters - Poison Ivy - Atco 6146
228 Sheriff & The Ravels - Shombalor - Vee-Jay 306
229 Bobby Adams - Don't Leave - Symbol 905
230 Skip & Flip - It Was I - Brent 7002
231 Ricky Nelson - Never Be Anyone Else But You - Imperial 5565
232 Travis & Bob - Tell Him No - Sandy 1017
233 The Platters - Enchanted - Mercury 71427
234 Jack Scott - Midgie - Carlton 514
235 Carl Dobkins Jr - My Heart Is An Open Book - Decca 30803
236 Hal Paige & The Whalers - Going Back To My Home Town - Fury 1024
237 Ray Charles - That's Enough - Atlantic 2022
238 The Heartbeats - One Million Years - Guyden 2011
239 Marty Robbins - The Hanging Tree - Columbia 41325
240 Johnny & the Hurricanes - Storm Warning - Warwick EP EX 700
241 Larry Hall - Sandy - Hot 1
242 Nat 'King' Cole - Midnight Flyer - Capitol 4248
243 Bo Diddley - Crackin' Up - Checker 924
244 Ronnie Dawson - Rockin' Bones - Rockin' 1
245 Little Ike - She Can Rock - Champion 1011
246 Bill Black's Combo - Smokie Part 2 - Hi 2018
247 Percy Faith - Theme From A Summer Place - Columbia 41490
248 The Crickets - Love's Made A Fool Of You - Brunswick 55124
249 Ivo Robic - Morgen - Polydor (Germany) 23
250 Connie Stevens - Sixteen Reasons - Warner Bros 5137
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 06:30:31 UTC
Permalink
On Aug 13, 1:24 am, carl <***@cox.net> wrote:
\>
My top 250,  it's getting a lot harder to keep to 200.  Lot more pop on top I'm afraid.  This is the year I started listening to the radio, and I have good memories of a lot of what was popular.
1       Bobby Darin - Mack The Knife - Atco 6147
The 45 version is a must. The mix on the album version has much louder
sopunding horns that detract from the record IMO. Same vocal, just
raised levels of the horns in the background on the stereo LP mix.
5       Fabian - Turn Me Loose - Chancellor 1033
LOL....THIS HIGH?
31      Duane Eddy - Moovin' N' Groovin' - Jamie 1101
This is 1958, possibly even Dec 1957.

http://rcs-discography.com/rcs/artist.php?key=eddy1000
47      Charlie Ryan & The Timberline Riders - Hot Rod Lincoln - 4 Star 1733
Roger thinks this is much earlier originally.
48      Screamin' Joe Neal - Rock 'n' Roll Deacon - Shippings 13229
This is 1956 I think.
71      Jack Scott - The Way I Walk - Carlton 514
Out already in 48 on an album.
198     The Moonbeems - Cryin' The Blues - Sapphire 2250
I've got 1958 on this.
215     Bo Diddley - Oh Yeah - Checker 914
I like this much better by the Shadows Of Knight.
234     Jack Scott - Midgie - Carlton 514
Also on an album in 1958.

CARLTON STLP 12/107 - Jack Scott - Jack Scott [1958] Save My Soul (S)/
With Your Love (S)/Leroy (E)/No One Will Ever Know (S)/Geraldine (S)/I
Can't Help It (S)//Indiana Waltz (S)/Midgie (S)/My True Love (E)/The
Way I Walk (S)/I'm Dreaming Of You (S)/Goodbye Baby (S)
247     Percy Faith - Theme From A Summer Place - Columbia 41490
Amost made my list, but could not take all the violins.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 06:38:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
71      Jack Scott - The Way I Walk - Carlton 514
Out already in 48 on an album.
That's 58.
carl
2012-08-13 07:21:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
\>
My top 250,  it's getting a lot harder to keep to 200.  Lot more pop on top I'm afraid.  This is the year I started listening to the radio, and I have good memories of a lot of what was popular.
1       Bobby Darin - Mack The Knife - Atco 6147
The 45 version is a must. The mix on the album version has much louder
sopunding horns that detract from the record IMO. Same vocal, just
raised levels of the horns in the background on the stereo LP mix.
Agreed
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
5       Fabian - Turn Me Loose - Chancellor 1033
LOL....THIS HIGH?
Just heard my number 4 Kansas City on my station, think I'm gonna move Turn Me Loose up to number 4. I know there's not a lot of love for Fabian on this board, but I list to Turn Me Loose probably a 100 times a year and never tire of it.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
31      Duane Eddy - Moovin' N' Groovin' - Jamie 1101
This is 1958, possibly even Dec 1957.
http://rcs-discography.com/rcs/artist.php?key=eddy1000
Just added it to my 58 list a few months ago andneglected to take it off the 59 list.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
47      Charlie Ryan & The Timberline Riders - Hot Rod Lincoln - 4 Star 1733
Roger thinks this is much earlier originally.
There may have been two versions of this. >
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
48      Screamin' Joe Neal - Rock 'n' Roll Deacon - Shippings 13229
This is 1956 I think.
I saw this on an earlier list of yours as 1956, but I found two different sources on the web I believe, as 1959, so I'm really son't know.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
71      Jack Scott - The Way I Walk - Carlton 514
Out already in 48 on an album.
When I prepared my lists, I was usig the single release date, the year they were listed in the yearly battles. I've tried to use album release dates only if no single release.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
198     The Moonbeems - Cryin' The Blues - Sapphire 2250
I've got 1958 on this.
215     Bo Diddley - Oh Yeah - Checker 914
I like this much better by the Shadows Of Knight.
First heard it by the Shadows myself. Haven't heard they're version for many years though so I don;t have an opinion
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
234     Jack Scott - Midgie - Carlton 514
Also on an album in 1958.
CARLTON STLP 12/107 - Jack Scott - Jack Scott [1958] Save My Soul (S)/
With Your Love (S)/Leroy (E)/No One Will Ever Know (S)/Geraldine (S)/I
Can't Help It (S)//Indiana Waltz (S)/Midgie (S)/My True Love (E)/The
Way I Walk (S)/I'm Dreaming Of You (S)/Goodbye Baby (S)
247     Percy Faith - Theme From A Summer Place - Columbia 41490
Amost made my list, but could not take all the violins.
Just checked out my first omission from your list, Dead Man's Stroll. Could've swore I listened to it 10 years ago and it wss an instrumental. Just downloaded it, though, great song, seems to be called Midnight Stroll now. Appreciate your lists and the comments.

Carl
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 14:36:25 UTC
Permalink
Just checked out my first omission from your list, Dead Man's Stroll.  Could've swore I listened to it 10 years ago and it wss an instrumental.  Just downloaded it, though, great song, seems to be called Midnight Stroll now.  Appreciate your lists and the comments.
The first pressing of the 45 said "Dead Man's Stroll" but they changed
it to "Midnight Stroll" before it ever charted. I suppose when people
saw the "Dead" title they were not getting any airplay. Back in the
1970s someone found a shitload of copies of the first pressing and we
had big stock on it at Relic.

Loading Image...

Loading Image...
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 14:45:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by carl
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
48      Screamin' Joe Neal - Rock 'n' Roll Deacon - Shippings 13229
This is 1956 I think.
I saw this on an earlier list of yours as 1956, but I found two different sources on the web I believe, as 1959, so I'm really son't know.
Here's the record:

Loading Image...

I gotta admit, it doesn't sound like anything else from 1956. The
first record anything like it is "Keep A' Knockin" in late 1957.

Roger, do you have any substantial info on when this thing is from?
Roger Ford
2012-08-13 19:52:16 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 Aug 2012 07:45:00 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by carl
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
48 =A0 =A0 =A0Screamin' Joe Neal - Rock 'n' Roll Deacon - Shippings 1=
3229
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
This is 1956 I think.
I saw this on an earlier list of yours as 1956, but I found two different=
sources on the web I believe, as 1959, so I'm really son't know.
http://www.heebiejeebies.nl/images/labels/1152.gif
I gotta admit, it doesn't sound like anything else from 1956. The
first record anything like it is "Keep A' Knockin" in late 1957.
Roger, do you have any substantial info on when this thing is from?
Nothing at all I'm afraid. All I have is the common internet spiel
that it was supposed to be out in 1956 on Emerge,a St Louis local
label. I can find no other details on either Neal or the Emerge
company. No mention in Billboard ever of either AFAIK

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
Dean F.
2012-08-13 06:29:32 UTC
Permalink
And here's the link to my own list of '59 faves:

http://rateyourmusic.com/list/goldwax317/1959__my_personal_top_100_
Roger Ford
2012-08-13 07:10:14 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 Aug 2012 19:51:27 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
It's gonna take much longer for me to revise and expand my yearly
lists from the 50s, but I have 1959 done. It came out exactly to a top
250.
24 =A6 Love Potion # 9 =A6 Clovers
Is this as the released single? Or is it the "real" unedited "Love
Potion #10" version?
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
25 =A6 Hallelujah I Love Her So (undubbed) =A6 Eddie Cochran
I don't think I have this but in any case I don't like the song by him
very much
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
93 =A6 Rock And Roll Daddy-O =A6 Joey Castle
There used to be some controversy over here about this guy relating to
a record issued by UK Decca in 1957 by one "Joey Castell" (sic)
"Trying To Get To You"/"I'm Left You're Right She's Gone" that was
rumored for years to actually be this guy Bronx-born Joey Castle with
songs recorded whilst on a visit to London. He died in 1978 and his
Mother was adamant that he never set foot outside the USA. That seemed
to end the mystery but for the fact that Castle did do an Elvis clone
act on several ocassions most notably as "Cliff Rivers" in 1963 on
"True Lips" for the NYC based Thanks label
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
106 =A6 My Last Meal =A6 Jimmy Rogers
Nice take by Rogers on the 1956 "The Last Meal" by Hurricane Harry. I
also very much like the Danny Cobb revamp of this (also 1956) as "Hey
Mr Warden"
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
109 =A6 Love You So =A6 Ron Holden & Thunderbirds
The flip of this "My Babe" was always the more popular side over here.
I like it better too
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
127 =A6 Guitar Boogie Shuffle =A6 Virtues
Suprising that this never scored better in the 1959 Singles Battle and
so didn't make the Instrumental contest
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
196 =A6 Real Gone Daddy =A6 Jim Flaherty's Caravan
Here's a RAB thing I never heard before. On the Jenn label I see.
Don't rewmember ever seeing that so I'm pretty sure I never passed up
any 25 count boxes of it which maskes me feel better. Not a bad sound
at all.
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
222 =A6 Bad Luck And Trouble =A6 Boogie Jake
This came out first as Minit 601 credited to Matthew Jacobs (Jake's
real name). The "Jake" version was Minit 602. Both from 1959 before
Minit had the Imperial distribution deal. Hence the Jake record was
leased to Chess for national distribution and was reissued for a third
time as Chess 1746
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
234 =A6 Misty =A6 Johnny Mathis
Diane is out on her own with this cos I like this one a lot too.
Kittens up trees and all!!!! lol!
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
237 =A6 Brand New Cadillac =A6 Vince Taylor
Gosh,a BRITISH recording here... in 1959. And one of the very best
things these islands produced in those late 50's
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
250 =A6 Here Comes Summer =A6 Jerry Keller
You REALLY went and spoiled it with this very last record. I HATE this
thing!! It is so SUGARY! Yukk!!! (and of course 'twas #1 here in UK!!
:)

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "b" in my e-mail address (***@bblueyonder.co.uk).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 07:16:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
On Sun, 12 Aug 2012 19:51:27 -0700 (PDT), The Bloomfield Buddy
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
It's gonna take much longer for me to revise and expand my yearly
lists from the 50s, but I have 1959 done. It came out exactly to a top
250.
24 =A6 Love Potion # 9 =A6 Clovers
Is this as the released single? Or is it the "real" unedited "Love
Potion #10" version?
I have both, but it's the regular version that's in my playlist.
Post by Roger Ford
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
196 =A6 Real Gone Daddy =A6 Jim Flaherty's Caravan
Here's a RAB thing I never heard before. On the Jenn label I see.
Don't rewmember ever seeing that so I'm pretty sure I never passed up
any 25 count boxes of it which maskes me feel better. Not a bad sound
at all.
Would have been a costly passing up, Price guide says 200-300.
Post by Roger Ford
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
250 =A6 Here Comes Summer =A6 Jerry Keller
You REALLY went and spoiled it with this very last record. I HATE this
thing!! It is so SUGARY! Yukk!!! (and of course 'twas #1 here in UK!!
Wait till you show us your 250, I;m sure there's worse on there !!!

Fleetwoods maybe?
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-13 16:48:17 UTC
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Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
221 ¦ Knockin' At Your Door ¦ Elmore James
This has been deleted. I already have it on the 1960 list, where it
belongs. I had a slightly different title so I thought they were two
different records I guess.
The Bloomfield Buddy
2012-08-18 06:06:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Bloomfield Buddy
113 ¦ By The Light Of The Silvery Moon ¦ Little Richard
This has been dropped.

When I did this the other day I could not figure out why it was not on
the list already. I was sure I had it ranked. I finally figured out
what happened, It's on the 1958 list, where it belongs. I had the tag
on the MP3 listed as 1959 in one place and 1958 in another place. When
I pulled up everything ffrom 1959 to revise this list, it came up.
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