Discussion:
The Number Ones: The Kingston Trio’s “Tom Dooley”
Add Reply
Bob Roman
2018-11-05 02:55:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1 in the Billboard Hot 100.

The Kingston Trio – “Tom Dooley”
HIT #1: November 17, 1958
STAYED AT #1: 1 week

The most interesting thing about the Coen Brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis — and, as far as I can tell, the most accurate — was the way the Coens depicted the early-’60s Greenwich Village folk scene as something other than a hive of starving geniuses bouncing ideas off of each other. Instead, the movie showed us an anachronistic form of mercenary capitalism. These young people clearly took themselves seriously, but they were also hustling to make a buck — to put together a catchy-enough novelty song, or to craft a salable persona, or to land a decent-paying gig at a Chicago nightclub. And all of them were, in one way or another, trying to be the Kingston Trio.

The Kingston Trio weren’t from Greenwich Village; they were from San Francisco, by way of Hawaii and San Diego. But their phenomenal, hard-to-explain late-’50s popularity was a huge part of the reason the folk music boom happened in the first place. Folk-music historians and activists like Harry Smith, Pete Seeger, and Woody Guthrie helped shape the popular image of folk music as a noble American tradition, but the Kingston Trio were the ones who actually succeeded in turning it into pop. And the song that made them famous was “Tom Dooley,” a nearly century-old traditional about a former Confederate soldier and prisoner of war who murdered one of his lovers.

Tom Doula was a real person, a North Carolina Civil War vet who, for reasons never quite discovered, murdered a woman named Laura Foster in 1866 and who was hung for it. The song existed in a number of different forms before the Kingston Trio got their hands on it. They made it into a chaste choirboy singalong that never gave any sense of the fear or rage or pain or uncertainty of any of the song’s characters. Rather than digging into the song’s specifics, the Kingston Trio used it as a showcase for their tastefully plucked banjos and their bleached-out harmonies.

Heard today, “Tom Dooley” sounds like the rankest kind of poverty tourism, and the fact that the people involved were real human beings makes it grosser. The members of the group do what they can to resurrect those old forms, but they sound like buttoned-up patricians, not like narrators who could’ve actually known any of the people involved. It’s a flat, detached piece of music. And at the first-ever Grammy Awards, in 1959 — where “Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu (Volare)” won both Record Of The Year and Song Of The Year — “Tom Dooley” took home the trophy for Best Country & Western performance, despite not being a remotely country or western song. (No folk award existed at that point.) And thus began the grand Grammy tradition of handing out awards that don’t make any sense at all.

GRADE: 2/10
SavoyBG
2018-11-05 05:40:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
This guy is a real asshole. I can envision when he gets to dogshit like "West End Girls" by the Pet Shop Boys and give it an 8 or something.
Eric Ramon
2018-11-05 19:02:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SavoyBG
This guy is a real asshole. I can envision when he gets to dogshit like "West End Girls" by the Pet Shop Boys and give it an 8 or something.
last I saw he was somewhere in the 60s and irritating me with his non-understanding the context of the time. This column could be called "An Xer looks at older records and how they relate to his taste in Xer music".

Still, kind of fun to see how wrong he is and, occasionally, he's right.
SavoyBG
2018-11-05 19:23:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Eric Ramon
Post by SavoyBG
This guy is a real asshole. I can envision when he gets to dogshit like "West End Girls" by the Pet Shop Boys and give it an 8 or something.
last I saw he was somewhere in the 60s and irritating me with his non-understanding the context of the time.
This column could be called "An Xer looks at older records and how they relate to his taste in Xer music".
Exactly!
Bob Roman
2018-11-05 19:25:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Eric Ramon
last I saw he was somewhere in the 60s and irritating me with his non-
understanding the context of the time. This column could be called "An Xer
looks at older records and how they relate to his taste in Xer music".
Still, kind of fun to see how wrong he is and, occasionally, he's right.
To me, that's what makes it interesting. History is always ultimately written by a generation that was not there, that views past artifacts through the lens of a later time. The farther we move forward in time, the more the discussion about the music this group likes will be written by people his age and younger. So this column, for good or bad, gives a preview of history's final judgment.

The complaint "You don't get it" is of course true, but inevitable.

--
BR
Dennis C
2018-11-05 19:59:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
And upon reading this forum, so you think the future generations will monastically preserve,study and revere a "Canticle for Blumenthal"?
Dennis C
2018-11-05 14:30:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Tom Doula was HANGED for his crime
. His Tarheel slave was hung,baby!!
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-05 15:07:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
The Kingston Trio ­ ³Tom Dooley²
HIT #1: November 17, 1958
STAYED AT #1: 1 week
The most interesting thing about the Coen Brothers¹ Inside Llewyn Davis ‹
and, as far as I can tell, the most accurate ‹ was the way the Coens depicted
the early-¹60s Greenwich Village folk scene as something other than a hive of
starving geniuses bouncing ideas off of each other. Instead, the movie showed
us an anachronistic form of mercenary capitalism. These young people clearly
took themselves seriously, but they were also hustling to make a buck ‹ to
put together a catchy-enough novelty song, or to craft a salable persona, or
to land a decent-paying gig at a Chicago nightclub. And all of them were, in
one way or another, trying to be the Kingston Trio.
The Kingston Trio weren¹t from Greenwich Village; they were from San
Francisco, by way of Hawaii and San Diego. But their phenomenal,
hard-to-explain late-¹50s popularity was a huge part of the reason the folk
music boom happened in the first place. Folk-music historians and activists
like Harry Smith, Pete Seeger, and Woody Guthrie helped shape the popular
image of folk music as a noble American tradition, but the Kingston Trio were
the ones who actually succeeded in turning it into pop. And the song that
made them famous was ³Tom Dooley,² a nearly century-old traditional about a
former Confederate soldier and prisoner of war who murdered one of his
lovers.
Tom Doula was a real person, a North Carolina Civil War vet who, for reasons
never quite discovered, murdered a woman named Laura Foster in 1866 and who
was hung for it. The song existed in a number of different forms before the
Kingston Trio got their hands on it. They made it into a chaste choirboy
singalong that never gave any sense of the fear or rage or pain or
uncertainty of any of the song¹s characters. Rather than digging into the
song¹s specifics, the Kingston Trio used it as a showcase for their
tastefully plucked banjos and their bleached-out harmonies.
Heard today, ³Tom Dooley² sounds like the rankest kind of poverty tourism,
and the fact that the people involved were real human beings makes it
grosser. The members of the group do what they can to resurrect those old
forms, but they sound like buttoned-up patricians, not like narrators who
could¹ve actually known any of the people involved. It¹s a flat, detached
piece of music. And at the first-ever Grammy Awards, in 1959 ‹ where ³Nel Blu
Dipinto di Blu (Volare)² won both Record Of The Year and Song Of The Year ‹
³Tom Dooley² took home the trophy for Best Country & Western performance,
despite not being a remotely country or western song. (No folk award existed
at that point.) And thus began the grand Grammy tradition of handing out
awards that don¹t make any sense at all.
GRADE: 2/10
He's right about the Grammy, overly harsh about the song. What he
doesn't get it how much of what hit big in the 50s was about the
"sound" of the record seeming to be both new, different from everything
else, and yet somehow appealing. Just look at what he's covered so
far, throw in calypso, and you can see that the "sound" craze was
peaking in '58. Along with "you can dance to it," the Bandstand kids
favored songs that "didn't sound like anything else."

The worst thing about "Tom Dooley" is that, iirc, it fostered the
maudlin "death song" craze that made top-40 radio almost unbearable for
the next couple of years.
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
Roger Ford
2018-11-05 19:23:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 05 Nov 2018 10:07:58 -0500, Mark Dintenfass
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Bob Roman
A writer named Tom Breihan has been reviewing, in order, every song to hit #1
in the Billboard Hot 100.
The Kingston Trio ­ ³Tom Dooley²
HIT #1: November 17, 1958
STAYED AT #1: 1 week
The most interesting thing about the Coen Brothers¹ Inside Llewyn Davis ‹
and, as far as I can tell, the most accurate ‹ was the way the Coens depicted
the early-¹60s Greenwich Village folk scene as something other than a hive of
starving geniuses bouncing ideas off of each other. Instead, the movie showed
us an anachronistic form of mercenary capitalism. These young people clearly
took themselves seriously, but they were also hustling to make a buck ‹ to
put together a catchy-enough novelty song, or to craft a salable persona, or
to land a decent-paying gig at a Chicago nightclub. And all of them were, in
one way or another, trying to be the Kingston Trio.
The Kingston Trio weren¹t from Greenwich Village; they were from San
Francisco, by way of Hawaii and San Diego. But their phenomenal,
hard-to-explain late-¹50s popularity was a huge part of the reason the folk
music boom happened in the first place. Folk-music historians and activists
like Harry Smith, Pete Seeger, and Woody Guthrie helped shape the popular
image of folk music as a noble American tradition, but the Kingston Trio were
the ones who actually succeeded in turning it into pop. And the song that
made them famous was ³Tom Dooley,² a nearly century-old traditional about a
former Confederate soldier and prisoner of war who murdered one of his
lovers.
Tom Doula was a real person, a North Carolina Civil War vet who, for reasons
never quite discovered, murdered a woman named Laura Foster in 1866 and who
was hung for it. The song existed in a number of different forms before the
Kingston Trio got their hands on it. They made it into a chaste choirboy
singalong that never gave any sense of the fear or rage or pain or
uncertainty of any of the song¹s characters. Rather than digging into the
song¹s specifics, the Kingston Trio used it as a showcase for their
tastefully plucked banjos and their bleached-out harmonies.
Heard today, ³Tom Dooley² sounds like the rankest kind of poverty tourism,
and the fact that the people involved were real human beings makes it
grosser. The members of the group do what they can to resurrect those old
forms, but they sound like buttoned-up patricians, not like narrators who
could¹ve actually known any of the people involved. It¹s a flat, detached
piece of music. And at the first-ever Grammy Awards, in 1959 ‹ where ³Nel Blu
Dipinto di Blu (Volare)² won both Record Of The Year and Song Of The Year ‹
³Tom Dooley² took home the trophy for Best Country & Western performance,
despite not being a remotely country or western song. (No folk award existed
at that point.) And thus began the grand Grammy tradition of handing out
awards that don¹t make any sense at all.
GRADE: 2/10
He's right about the Grammy, overly harsh about the song. What he
doesn't get it how much of what hit big in the 50s was about the
"sound" of the record seeming to be both new, different from everything
else, and yet somehow appealing. Just look at what he's covered so
far, throw in calypso, and you can see that the "sound" craze was
peaking in '58. Along with "you can dance to it," the Bandstand kids
favored songs that "didn't sound like anything else."
I hated the "Tom Dooley" song which was bigger over here in the local
Lonnie Donegan cover (tho both he and the Kingston Trio reached Top 10
with it)



The song certainly helped cement my life long aversion (with a VERY
few exceptions) to "folk music" whose greatest popularity would
become evident a few years later.

As you may guess I DETESTED The Kingston Trio and their works.

Persinally I think The Four Preps got it right. "Hang down the
Kingston Trio....hang 'em from a tall oak tree....eliminate The
Kingston Trio......

Right on,fellas!
Post by Mark Dintenfass
The worst thing about "Tom Dooley" is that, iirc, it fostered the
maudlin "death song" craze that made top-40 radio almost unbearable for
the next couple of years.
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped. Hence I
was able to like a few such records for their SOUND---the best example
of which must be The Everlys and their sparkling harmonies on "Ebony
Eyes" which I like but IIRC was panned by pretty well everyone else
here lol!

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-05 18:57:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
I hated the "Tom Dooley" song which was bigger over here in the local
Lonnie Donegan cover (tho both he and the Kingston Trio reached Top 10
with it)
http://youtu.be/VSH7N-HaxnE
The song certainly helped cement my life long aversion (with a VERY
few exceptions) to "folk music" whose greatest popularity would
become evident a few years later.
As you may guess I DETESTED The Kingston Trio and their works.
Persinally I think The Four Preps got it right. "Hang down the
Kingston Trio....hang 'em from a tall oak tree....eliminate The
Kingston Trio......
Right on,fellas!
Post by Mark Dintenfass
The worst thing about "Tom Dooley" is that, iirc, it fostered the
maudlin "death song" craze that made top-40 radio almost unbearable for
the next couple of years.
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped. Hence I
was able to like a few such records for their SOUND---the best example
of which must be The Everlys and their sparkling harmonies on "Ebony
Eyes" which I like but IIRC was panned by pretty well everyone else
here lol!
Including me. :-) Though if you were torturing me, you'd have much
better results with "Running Bear" and "Tell Laura I Love Her."

As for the Kingston Trio, I heard them differently at the time, in part
because I could remember the Weavers' string of hits in the early 50s
which I liked a lot, and I already knew their first Carnegie Hall
album. So I understood right away that the college boys in their
striped shirts weren't really doing folk and enjoyed a few of their
songs for what they were. Their early albums, btw, especially their
live recording at the Hungry I, were a bit better than their singles.
So I reserved the venom until Peter, Paul & Mary came long. They were a
lot more obnoxious to me than the Trio, imo, because they were more
cynically exploitive of the more sincere (for better or worse! folk
revival of the early 60s.
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
Jim Colegrove
2018-11-05 20:36:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 05 Nov 2018 13:57:29 -0500, Mark Dintenfass
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Roger Ford
I hated the "Tom Dooley" song which was bigger over here in the local
Lonnie Donegan cover (tho both he and the Kingston Trio reached Top 10
with it)
http://youtu.be/VSH7N-HaxnE
The song certainly helped cement my life long aversion (with a VERY
few exceptions) to "folk music" whose greatest popularity would
become evident a few years later.
As you may guess I DETESTED The Kingston Trio and their works.
Persinally I think The Four Preps got it right. "Hang down the
Kingston Trio....hang 'em from a tall oak tree....eliminate The
Kingston Trio......
Right on,fellas!
Post by Mark Dintenfass
The worst thing about "Tom Dooley" is that, iirc, it fostered the
maudlin "death song" craze that made top-40 radio almost unbearable for
the next couple of years.
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped. Hence I
was able to like a few such records for their SOUND---the best example
of which must be The Everlys and their sparkling harmonies on "Ebony
Eyes" which I like but IIRC was panned by pretty well everyone else
here lol!
Including me. :-) Though if you were torturing me, you'd have much
better results with "Running Bear" and "Tell Laura I Love Her."
As for the Kingston Trio, I heard them differently at the time, in part
because I could remember the Weavers' string of hits in the early 50s
which I liked a lot, and I already knew their first Carnegie Hall
album. So I understood right away that the college boys in their
striped shirts weren't really doing folk and enjoyed a few of their
songs for what they were. Their early albums, btw, especially their
live recording at the Hungry I, were a bit better than their singles.
So I reserved the venom until Peter, Paul & Mary came long. They were a
lot more obnoxious to me than the Trio, imo, because they were more
cynically exploitive of the more sincere (for better or worse! folk
revival of the early 60s.
As Albert Grossman said regarding PP&M, "A Kingston Trio with a girl."
He thought Peter would need some help with his act. Plus, Noel Stookey
was/is very talented.
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-05 20:41:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Colegrove
On Mon, 05 Nov 2018 13:57:29 -0500, Mark Dintenfass
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Roger Ford
I hated the "Tom Dooley" song which was bigger over here in the local
Lonnie Donegan cover (tho both he and the Kingston Trio reached Top 10
with it)
http://youtu.be/VSH7N-HaxnE
The song certainly helped cement my life long aversion (with a VERY
few exceptions) to "folk music" whose greatest popularity would
become evident a few years later.
As you may guess I DETESTED The Kingston Trio and their works.
Persinally I think The Four Preps got it right. "Hang down the
Kingston Trio....hang 'em from a tall oak tree....eliminate The
Kingston Trio......
Right on,fellas!
Post by Mark Dintenfass
The worst thing about "Tom Dooley" is that, iirc, it fostered the
maudlin "death song" craze that made top-40 radio almost unbearable for
the next couple of years.
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped. Hence I
was able to like a few such records for their SOUND---the best example
of which must be The Everlys and their sparkling harmonies on "Ebony
Eyes" which I like but IIRC was panned by pretty well everyone else
here lol!
Including me. :-) Though if you were torturing me, you'd have much
better results with "Running Bear" and "Tell Laura I Love Her."
As for the Kingston Trio, I heard them differently at the time, in part
because I could remember the Weavers' string of hits in the early 50s
which I liked a lot, and I already knew their first Carnegie Hall
album. So I understood right away that the college boys in their
striped shirts weren't really doing folk and enjoyed a few of their
songs for what they were. Their early albums, btw, especially their
live recording at the Hungry I, were a bit better than their singles.
So I reserved the venom until Peter, Paul & Mary came long. They were a
lot more obnoxious to me than the Trio, imo, because they were more
cynically exploitive of the more sincere (for better or worse! folk
revival of the early 60s.
As Albert Grossman said regarding PP&M, "A Kingston Trio with a girl."
He thought Peter would need some help with his act. Plus, Noel Stookey
was/is very talented.
Granted. And their version of "Blowin' in the Wind" helped put Dylan on
the fast track. But still the records were brutal and the enterprise as
cynical as the group name. Was his first name really Noel? (Yup. Just
checked.)
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
Dennis C
2018-11-05 22:28:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Noel? Yuch!! He should have just stuck aith Stooky and they could have performed as PMS and defined their music as post minstral,baby!
SavoyBG
2018-11-05 22:34:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Granted. And their version of "Blowin' in the Wind" helped put Dylan on
the fast track. But still the records were brutal and the enterprise as
cynical as the group name.
I like PP&M. Must be my whiteness coming out.
Jim Colegrove
2018-11-05 22:50:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Granted. And their version of "Blowin' in the Wind" helped put Dylan on
the fast track. But still the records were brutal and the enterprise as
cynical as the group name.
I like PP&M. Must be my whiteness coming out.
Here's some whiteness coming out.

"Goodbye Baby" - Noel Stookey and his Corsairs


SavoyBG
2018-11-05 23:06:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Colegrove
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Granted. And their version of "Blowin' in the Wind" helped put Dylan on
the fast track. But still the records were brutal and the enterprise as
cynical as the group name.
I like PP&M. Must be my whiteness coming out.
Here's some whiteness coming out.
"Goodbye Baby" - Noel Stookey and his Corsairs
http://youtu.be/rrISqkJE3Vk
Did not know it. It's good!

Not on Terry Gordon's site, I guess because it's not guitar oriented and has little country influence. Video says recorded in 1956 and released in 1957.
Dennis C
2018-11-05 23:39:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Carl Perkins should have fired a blue suede shoe at intellectually and aesthetically appropriating Stooky, baby!!
SavoyBG
2018-11-05 22:26:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped.
Of course I pay no attention to lyrics either, but it just so happens that many of those records sucked anyway, like "Teen Angel" and "Patches." Unlike most here I do like "Honey." I like "Running Bear " a lot, and I like "Last Kiss." Not a "Leader of the Pack" fan at all. I like "Moody River" and "Ode To Billy Joe." Don't like "Tell Laura I Love Her."

BTW, before someone asks how do I know that these songs are about death if I don't pay attention to the words, I googled them up on some sites about this subject.

http://www.the60sofficialsite.com/Songs_of_Tragedy.html
Bill B
2018-11-05 22:48:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped.
Of course I pay no attention to lyrics either, but it just so happens that many of those records sucked anyway, like "Teen Angel" and "Patches." Unlike most here I do like "Honey." I like "Running Bear " a lot, and I like "Last Kiss." Not a "Leader of the Pack" fan at all. I like "Moody River" and "Ode To Billy Joe." Don't like "Tell Laura I Love Her."
BTW, before someone asks how do I know that these songs are about death if I don't pay attention to the words, I googled them up on some sites about this subject.
http://www.the60sofficialsite.com/Songs_of_Tragedy.html
I'm another one who likes "Honey." I liked the first song of tragedy that I remember hearing, "Black Denim Trousers," which is uncharacteristically upbeat for the genre. And I liked "Endless Sea," though it might not qualify since he rescues his baby.
Bill B
2018-11-05 22:49:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bill B
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped.
Of course I pay no attention to lyrics either, but it just so happens that many of those records sucked anyway, like "Teen Angel" and "Patches." Unlike most here I do like "Honey." I like "Running Bear " a lot, and I like "Last Kiss." Not a "Leader of the Pack" fan at all. I like "Moody River" and "Ode To Billy Joe." Don't like "Tell Laura I Love Her."
BTW, before someone asks how do I know that these songs are about death if I don't pay attention to the words, I googled them up on some sites about this subject.
http://www.the60sofficialsite.com/Songs_of_Tragedy.html
I'm another one who likes "Honey." I liked the first song of tragedy that I remember hearing, "Black Denim Trousers," which is uncharacteristically upbeat for the genre. And I liked "Endless Sea," though it might not qualify since he rescues his baby.
Make that "Endless Sleep."
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-05 23:48:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bill B
I'm another one who likes "Honey."
Et tu, Bill?
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-05 23:47:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped.
Of course I pay no attention to lyrics either, but it just so happens that
many of those records sucked anyway, like "Teen Angel" and "Patches." Unlike
most here I do like "Honey." I like "Running Bear " a lot, and I like "Last
Kiss." Not a "Leader of the Pack" fan at all. I like "Moody River" and "Ode
To Billy Joe." Don't like "Tell Laura I Love Her."
BTW, before someone asks how do I know that these songs are about death if I
don't pay attention to the words, I googled them up on some sites about this
subject.
http://www.the60sofficialsite.com/Songs_of_Tragedy.html
"Ode To Billy Joe" comes much later and isn't part of the fad I was
talking about. It's also a very good record.

That you like "Honey" is so mind-boggling that I'm going to have to
recalibrate everything I know about you. Even if you ignore the words,
the record sounds awful.

And since we've expanded the subject, we should mention "Dead Man's
Curve," which, imo, is a pretty good record.
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
SavoyBG
2018-11-06 03:24:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped.
Of course I pay no attention to lyrics either, but it just so happens that
many of those records sucked anyway, like "Teen Angel" and "Patches." Unlike
most here I do like "Honey." I like "Running Bear " a lot, and I like "Last
Kiss." Not a "Leader of the Pack" fan at all. I like "Moody River" and "Ode
To Billy Joe." Don't like "Tell Laura I Love Her."
BTW, before someone asks how do I know that these songs are about death if I
don't pay attention to the words, I googled them up on some sites about this
subject.
http://www.the60sofficialsite.com/Songs_of_Tragedy.html
"Ode To Billy Joe" comes much later and isn't part of the fad I was
talking about. It's also a very good record.
That you like "Honey" is so mind-boggling that I'm going to have to
recalibrate everything I know about you. Even if you ignore the words,
the record sounds awful.
Not to me. I like the melody.
Dennis C
2018-11-06 03:35:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Bobby Russell had a knack for tricking one into the treacle, baby!! "Little Green Apples, Saturday Morning Confusion, and yes.....Honey, by god!! Infectous and confectious like Harry Nilsson. You just had to admit there was substance beneath the froth, baby!!!
t***@iwvisp.com
2018-11-06 02:09:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
One of the WFIL DJs, the late Dave Parks, would occasionally run a ‘Teenage Death Song’ contest, similar to Jock in the Box; guess the correct dead teen, get a prize!

You don’t like Patches? Lyrics aside, while important, that a great R & B riff.

Ray
Roger Ford
2018-11-06 05:57:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roger Ford
I never had anywhere near the problem with the "death disc" craze as I
did with the "folk boom". I guess the fact that most of the "morbid"
lyrics (that seemed to put others off) passed me by helped.
Of course I pay no attention to lyrics either, but it just so happens that =
many of those records sucked anyway, like "Teen Angel" and "Patches."
OK let's see how we compare

Yes,I agree on both of these which I disliked greatly.

"Teen Angel" especially comes across as exceedingly dopey sounding
Unlike most here I do like "Honey." I like "Running Bear " a lot, and I like "La=
st Kiss."
The whole sound of "Honey" is so saccharine (and btw the Bobby
Goldsboro #1 was a cover of the original by Bob Shane of..um..The
Kingston Trio :)

I hated "Running Bear" and the best thing that can be said aboiut the
Johnny Preston #1 (on both sides of the pond) is that the Smiley
Wilson cover is even worse.

Never liked "Last Kiss" in any version
Not a "Leader of the Pack" fan at all.
I liked "Leader Of The Pack" and the girls themselves too.
I like "Moody River" and "Ode To Billy Joe."
"Moody River" is one of Boone's very best records even tho its whole
structure and sound is lifted lock,stock and teardrops from the Chase
Webster original. He didn't care tho since Boone got him a Dot
contract in return for delivering another #1 for him..

The hugely atmospheric "Ode To Billy Joe" was my favorite current
record at the time and I still like it a lot today. Several other
Bobbie Gentry records are good too such as "Fancy"
Don't like "Tell Laura I Love Her."
The Ray Peterson original was banned here so this UK guy Ricky Valance
(wonder where the inspiration for that name came from?) did a
sanitised version that passed muster with the BBC and became #1 here.

I never cared for the song in either version


ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
Ken Whiton
2018-11-06 09:51:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
*-* On Mon, 05 Nov 2018, a 10:07:58 -0500,
*-* In Article <051120181007585643%***@xxnew.rr.com>,
*-* Mark Dintenfass wrote
*-* About Re: The Number Ones: The Kingston Trio's "Tom Dooley"

[ ... ]
Post by Mark Dintenfass
The worst thing about "Tom Dooley" is that, iirc, it fostered the
maudlin "death song" craze that made top-40 radio almost unbearable
for the next couple of years.
I never thought of "Tom Dooley" as one of those songs. Thomas
Wayne's "Tragedy", which came along just a few months after "Tom
Dooley", is the record I've always thought of as the one that ushered
in that craze.

For me, however, far and away the best "death song" record is
from 1955, well before the craze came along.

<http://www.45cat.com/record/45306>

Ken Whiton
--
FIDO: 1:132/152
InterNet: ***@surfglobal.net.INVAL (remove the obvious to reply)
Bill B
2018-11-06 11:45:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
*> I never thought of "Tom Dooley" as one of those songs. Thomas
Wayne's "Tragedy", which came along just a few months after "Tom
Dooley", is the record I've always thought of as the one that ushered
in that craze.
It may have ushered in the death song craze, but I doubt it because it isn't a death song. He urges his lover to come back to him.
Loading...