Discussion:
The Number Ones: Bobby Vee's "Take Good Care of My Baby"
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Bob Roman
2018-12-26 14:49:21 UTC
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Bobby Vee – “Take Good Care Of My Baby”
HIT #1: September 18, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks

One night in February of 1959, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper were all in a plane, on the way to play a show in Moorhead, Minnesota. The plane crashed, killing all three of them. Incredibly, that show in Moorhead still happened. Instead of seeing Buddy Holly, the kids at that show got to see Bobby Velline, a local 15-year-old kid who’d been looking forward to seeing the show, singing Holly’s songs. Imagine that. Imagine the balls on this child, willing to fill in for his suddenly-dead idol at a moment’s notice. Imagine the charisma that it must’ve taken to pull it off, to have the show remembered as anything but a heart-wrecking failure. Imagine the confidence to build an actual career on the back of that terrible night.

Bobby Vee must’ve been a special person. That’s the only way I can explain it. Bob Dylan certainly thought Vee was special. Dee, who briefly played in Vee’s backing band and who reportedly gave Vee his stage name, spoke glowingly of Vee for decades afterward. Vee must’ve had a rare and palpable personal magnetism, even as a teenager. Unfortunately, that magnetism didn’t really come through on “Take Good Care Of My Baby,” the only #1 hit that Vee ever landed.

“Take Good Care Of My Baby” is a good song. The married songwriting team of Carole King and Gerry Goffin, who’d scored their first #1 earlier in 1961 with the Shirelles’ “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” wrote “Take Good Care Of My Baby,” and the song fits a whole lot of competing emotions into a compact and economical pop-song format. Vee’s narrator sings to an ex’s new boyfriend, and he radiates regret and heartbreak and fondness. He wants the best for his ex, but he can’t pretend that he doesn’t want her back. And he knows he fucked it up: “If I’d been true / I know she’d never be with you.”

Unfortunately, Vee doesn’t really sell that heartbreak. He doesn’t sing sad lyrics with the oily grin that a peer like Pat Boone brought to “Moody River,” but he doesn’t sound lost or broken, either. He’s a bell-clear delivery machine, and he sounds utterly disconnected from what he’s singing. The song has a big, strong melody, and he delivers it capably, but it never quite lands.

GRADE: 6/10
Tony
2018-12-26 15:27:15 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
Bobby Vee – “Take Good Care Of My Baby”
HIT #1: September 18, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks
One night in February of 1959, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper were all in a plane, on the way to play a show in Moorhead, Minnesota. The plane crashed, killing all three of them. Incredibly, that show in Moorhead still happened. Instead of seeing Buddy Holly, the kids at that show got to see Bobby Velline, a local 15-year-old kid who’d been looking forward to seeing the show, singing Holly’s songs. Imagine that. Imagine the balls on this child, willing to fill in for his suddenly-dead idol at a moment’s notice. Imagine the charisma that it must’ve taken to pull it off, to have the show remembered as anything but a heart-wrecking failure. Imagine the confidence to build an actual career on the back of that terrible night.
Bobby Vee must’ve been a special person. That’s the only way I can explain it. Bob Dylan certainly thought Vee was special. Dee, who briefly played in Vee’s backing band and who reportedly gave Vee his stage name, spoke glowingly of Vee for decades afterward. Vee must’ve had a rare and palpable personal magnetism, even as a teenager. Unfortunately, that magnetism didn’t really come through on “Take Good Care Of My Baby,” the only #1 hit that Vee ever landed.
“Take Good Care Of My Baby” is a good song. The married songwriting team of Carole King and Gerry Goffin, who’d scored their first #1 earlier in 1961 with the Shirelles’ “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” wrote “Take Good Care Of My Baby,” and the song fits a whole lot of competing emotions into a compact and economical pop-song format. Vee’s narrator sings to an ex’s new boyfriend, and he radiates regret and heartbreak and fondness. He wants the best for his ex, but he can’t pretend that he doesn’t want her back. And he knows he fucked it up: “If I’d been true / I know she’d never be with you.”
Unfortunately, Vee doesn’t really sell that heartbreak. He doesn’t sing sad lyrics with the oily grin that a peer like Pat Boone brought to “Moody River,” but he doesn’t sound lost or broken, either. He’s a bell-clear delivery machine, and he sounds utterly disconnected from what he’s singing. The song has a big, strong melody, and he delivers it capably, but it never quite lands.
GRADE: 6/10
Grade: 3/10
Roger Ford
2018-12-26 16:25:47 UTC
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On Wed, 26 Dec 2018 06:49:21 -0800 (PST), Bob Roman
Bobby Vee – “Take Good Care Of My Baby”
HIT #1: September 18, 1961
STAYED AT #1: 3 weeks
One night in February of 1959, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper
were all in a plane, on the way to play a show in Moorhead, Minnesota. The plane
crashed, killing all three of them. Incredibly, that show in Moorhead still happened.
Instead of seeing Buddy Holly, the kids at that show got to see Bobby Velline, a
local 15-year-old kid who’d been looking forward to seeing the show, singing Holly’s
songs. Imagine that. Imagine the balls on this child, willing to fill in for his suddenly
-dead idol at a moment’s notice. Imagine the charisma that it must’ve taken to pull it
off, to have the show remembered as anything but a heart-wrecking failure. Imagine
the confidence to build an actual career on the back of that terrible night.
Bobby Vee must’ve been a special person. That’s the only way I can explain it.
Bob Dylan certainly thought Vee was special. Dee, who briefly played in Vee’s
backing band and who reportedly gave Vee his stage name, spoke glowingly of
Vee for decades afterward.
The ex-Elston Gunnn (sic) certainly had enough warmth towards Vee to
perform a tribute to him several times in his later concerts with his
own version of the Vee-written "Suzie Baby"
Vee must’ve had a rare and palpable personal magnetism, even as a teenager.
Unfortunately, that magnetism didn’t really come through on “Take Good Care
Of My Baby,” the only #1 hit that Vee ever landed.
It was his only #1 hit here in Britain too (for one week December 2
1961)
“Take Good Care Of My Baby” is a good song. The married songwriting team of
Carole King and Gerry Goffin, who’d scored their first #1 earlier in 1961 with the
Shirelles’ “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” wrote “Take Good Care Of My Baby,”
and the song fits a whole lot of competing emotions into a compact and economical
pop-song format. Vee’s narrator sings to an ex’s new boyfriend, and he radiates
regret and heartbreak and fondness. He wants the best for his ex, but he can’t
pretend that he doesn’t want her back. And he knows he fucked it up: “If I’d
been true / I know she’d never be with you.”
The song wasn't written for Vee and he wasn't the first to record it.

Liberty producer Snuff Garrett was at Aldon Music in the Brill
Building on a trip to NYC to find material for a new Vee single and
heard a demo (sung by Carole King herself) of "Take Good Care Of My
Baby". He was told that Dion (who BTW was also on that 1959 Buddy
Holly Winter Dance Party tour and of whom we will very shortly hear
much more in this series when Breihan gets to dealing with "Runaround
Sue") had already recorded it but no release by him was scheduled**.

Garrett went ahead and obtained the song for Vee but not before asking
Carole King to write an "introductory" verse that he thought was
needed to compliment the song. So with the "My tears are falling....."
bit tacked on at the beginning (which is not on the Dion original) the
song was finally recorded and released as the new Bobby Vee single
Unfortunately, Vee doesn’t really sell that heartbreak. He doesn’t sing sad lyrics
with the oily grin that a peer like Pat Boone brought to “Moody River,” but he
doesn’t sound lost or broken, either. He’s a bell-clear delivery machine, and he
sounds utterly disconnected from what he’s singing. The song has a big, strong
melody, and he delivers it capably, but it never quite lands.
GRADE: 6/10
Ditto grade for me too (6 = good). The song is good and together with
the already mentioned "Suzie Baby" and "The Night Has A Thousand Eyes"
is the only other Vee record I like

**The Dion original of "Take Good Care Of My Baby" finally came out
AFTER Vee had reached #1 with the song. It's on his "Runaround Sue" LP
on Laurie.



Here's how Vee did in the 1961 Singles Battle

R1
9 Bill Black's Combo - Ole Buttermilk Sky - Hi 2036
21 Bobby Vee - Take Good Care Of My Baby - Liberty 55354
R2
22 The Impressions - Gypsy Woman - ABC-Paramount 10241
5 Bobby Vee - Take Good Care Of My Baby - Liberty 55354
ROGER FORD
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Dennis C
2018-12-26 16:39:28 UTC
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If Bobby Vee and Joey Dee were a duo,would you be hesitant to clap?
SavoyBG
2018-12-26 16:43:33 UTC
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Post by Dennis C
If Bobby Vee and Joey Dee were a duo,would you be hesitant to clap?
Only if Valerie Dubouis was dancing on stage.

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