Discussion:
Early Rock-N-Roll inspired by Dadaism & Surrealists?
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Will Dockery
2018-11-22 19:39:46 UTC
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Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.

https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false

"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."

(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
SavoyBG
2018-11-22 19:45:46 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!

Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.

You stupid bastard!
Will Dockery
2018-11-22 22:33:39 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.

And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.

So I see it as very possible.
Eric Ramon
2018-11-23 00:13:02 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
So I see it as very possible.
my opinion is that, if there's any connection, it's from "intellectuals" hoping to glom onto Richard's art, hoping to convince others that not only are they hip but they were hip first!
BobbyM
2018-11-23 05:37:21 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
So I see it as very possible.
You neglect to take into account that you were born more thann a quarter of a century after Mr. Penniman, and your influences were likely greatly dissimilar.

I found nothing in that article that suggests that Little Richard was influenced by Dadaism or Surrealism, but that possibly he influenced Dadaists and Surrealists.
SavoyBG
2018-11-23 07:08:35 UTC
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Post by BobbyM
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
So I see it as very possible.
You neglect to take into account that you were born more thann a quarter of a century after Mr. Penniman, and your influences were likely greatly dissimilar.
I found nothing in that article that suggests that Little Richard was influenced by Dadaism or Surrealism, but that possibly he influenced Dadaists and Surrealists.
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
BobbyM
2018-11-23 08:46:07 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by BobbyM
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
So I see it as very possible.
You neglect to take into account that you were born more thann a quarter of a century after Mr. Penniman, and your influences were likely greatly dissimilar.
I found nothing in that article that suggests that Little Richard was influenced by Dadaism or Surrealism, but that possibly he influenced Dadaists and Surrealists.
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
I don't see that it falls in either. However, "Tutti-Frutti" might fit
the bill for both. But Dockery can probably rationalize this or
anything you come up with.
Will Dockery
2018-11-23 10:37:20 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by BobbyM
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
So I see it as very possible.
You neglect to take into account that you were born more thann a quarter of a century after Mr. Penniman, and your influences were likely greatly dissimilar.
I found nothing in that article that suggests that Little Richard was influenced by Dadaism or Surrealism, but that possibly he influenced Dadaists and Surrealists.
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
That one seems to be either an influence on or from the Beat poets, who were contemporaries of Little Richard and the other early Rockers.
Jim Colegrove
2018-11-23 15:27:22 UTC
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2018 02:37:20 -0800 (PST), Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by BobbyM
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
So I see it as very possible.
You neglect to take into account that you were born more thann a quarter of a century after Mr. Penniman, and your influences were likely greatly dissimilar.
I found nothing in that article that suggests that Little Richard was influenced by Dadaism or Surrealism, but that possibly he influenced Dadaists and Surrealists.
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
That one seems to be either an influence on or from the Beat poets, who were contemporaries of Little Richard and the other early Rockers.
That they were contemporaries of Little Richard does not mean there
was influence. Many of the Beat poets main music interest was jazz.
The influence you suggest may possibly be influence on Richard from
Be-bop musicians, who were jazz musicians.
Bill B
2018-11-23 11:38:23 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
It's "built for speed." Per Wiki:


The line in the original recorded version, "Long Tall Sally is built for speed", is a reference to the proverbial African-American distinction[clarification needed] in sexual types: "Built for comfort" or "built for speed", terms originally applied to passenger sailing ships. When sung rapidly, this line is sometimes rendered "built sweet", even by Little Richard in a recorded live performance. Though it is not a perfect rhyme with the word "need", it fits through assonance
SavoyBG
2018-11-23 14:50:12 UTC
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Post by Bill B
Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
The line in the original recorded version, "Long Tall Sally is built for speed", is a reference to the proverbial African-American distinction[clarification needed] in sexual types: "Built for comfort" or "built for speed", terms originally applied to passenger sailing ships. When sung rapidly, this line is sometimes rendered "built sweet", even by Little Richard in a recorded live performance. Though it is not a perfect rhyme with the word "need", it fits through assonance
I don't hear a word between "built" and "speed" or "sweet."
Roger Ford
2018-11-23 15:47:36 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncl=
e John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
The line in the original recorded version, "Long Tall Sally is built for =
speed", is a reference to the proverbial African-American distinction[clari=
fication needed] in sexual types: "Built for comfort" or "built for speed",=
terms originally applied to passenger sailing ships. When sung rapidly, th=
is line is sometimes rendered "built sweet", even by Little Richard in a re=
corded live performance. Though it is not a perfect rhyme with the word "ne=
ed", it fits through assonance
I don't hear a word between "built" and "speed" or "sweet."
It is indistinct but that "for" IS there (trying slowing the track
down some and you'll hear "built for speed")

For the record both the main two contemporary versions definitely say
"built for speed".

Marty Robbins does and so does Elvis

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
SavoyBG
2018-11-23 17:35:41 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncl=
e John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
The line in the original recorded version, "Long Tall Sally is built for =
speed", is a reference to the proverbial African-American distinction[clari=
fication needed] in sexual types: "Built for comfort" or "built for speed",=
terms originally applied to passenger sailing ships. When sung rapidly, th=
is line is sometimes rendered "built sweet", even by Little Richard in a re=
corded live performance. Though it is not a perfect rhyme with the word "ne=
ed", it fits through assonance
I don't hear a word between "built" and "speed" or "sweet."
It is indistinct but that "for" IS there (trying slowing the track
down some and you'll hear "built for speed")
For the record both the main two contemporary versions definitely say
"built for speed".
Marty Robbins does and so does Elvis
How about Pat?

I'm not arguing about what the words are supposed to be.
Bill B
2018-11-23 18:13:33 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by SavoyBG
How about Pat?
I'm not arguing about what the words are supposed to be.
I found nothing in that article that suggests that Little Richard was influenced by Dadaism or Surrealism, but that possibly he influenced Dadaists and Surrealists.
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
SavoyBG
2018-11-23 18:42:52 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by SavoyBG
Post by SavoyBG
How about Pat?
I'm not arguing about what the words are supposed to be.
I found nothing in that article that suggests that Little Richard was influenced by Dadaism or Surrealism, but that possibly he influenced Dadaists and Surrealists.
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
When I said "supposed to be" I meant how they are written in the sheet music. Even the Wiki article says that sometimes Richard sang them dofferently.
Roger Ford
2018-11-23 18:59:19 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncl=
e John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
The line in the original recorded version, "Long Tall Sally is built for =
speed", is a reference to the proverbial African-American distinction[clari=
fication needed] in sexual types: "Built for comfort" or "built for speed",=
terms originally applied to passenger sailing ships. When sung rapidly, th=
is line is sometimes rendered "built sweet", even by Little Richard in a re=
corded live performance. Though it is not a perfect rhyme with the word "ne=
ed", it fits through assonance
I don't hear a word between "built" and "speed" or "sweet."
It is indistinct but that "for" IS there (trying slowing the track
down some and you'll hear "built for speed")
For the record both the main two contemporary versions definitely say
"built for speed".
Marty Robbins does and so does Elvis
How about Pat?
I didn't count Boone as he sings his own set of lyrics

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
xpenenyx
2018-11-23 18:35:13 UTC
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Post by BobbyM
Dadaism or Surrealism
WTF is the above?
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-23 20:07:19 UTC
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Post by xpenenyx
Post by BobbyM
Dadaism or Surrealism
WTF is the above?
Dadaism was an art movement, spawned by WWI, that rebelliously tried to
destroy the old-fashioned foundations of all forms of art.

Surrealism was a movement, spawned by psychology, that said art should
be made from our irrational experience of the unconscious and dreams.

Hope that helps.:-)

And no, neither of them have anything to do with Little Richard unless
you interpret them in the loosest possible way.
--
--md
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Bob Roman
2018-11-23 21:24:04 UTC
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Post by Mark Dintenfass
Dadaism was an art movement, spawned by WWI, that rebelliously tried to
destroy the old-fashioned foundations of all forms of art.
By this standard, the second-generation of rockers, who had internalized the implicit rebellion of the first, could be called dadaists...

--
BR
Mark Dintenfass
2018-11-23 23:14:46 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Dadaism was an art movement, spawned by WWI, that rebelliously tried to
destroy the old-fashioned foundations of all forms of art.
By this standard, the second-generation of rockers, who had internalized the
implicit rebellion of the first, could be called dadaists...
As I implied, if you stretch things far enough you can find dada and
surrealism almost anywhere in all modern art. You can also find
romanticism, aestheticism, nee-classicism, impressionism, realism, and
any other -ism you care to name.

If you want real influence, though, you have to look at Yoko's interest
in Dada and how that affected John Lennon, or Allen Ginsberg's
surrealistic bent and how it affected Bob Dylan. There at least you're
dealing with influences that may have been direct and real. I doubt
you'd find anything similar in, say, the Chips' "Rubber Biscuit," even
though a careless critic might say that the song is as Dada-esque as
50s r'n'r could be.
--
--md
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Remove xx's from address to reply
Will Dockery
2018-11-23 23:32:45 UTC
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Post by Mark Dintenfass
Post by Bob Roman
Post by Mark Dintenfass
Dadaism was an art movement, spawned by WWI, that rebelliously tried to
destroy the old-fashioned foundations of all forms of art.
By this standard, the second-generation of rockers, who had internalized the
implicit rebellion of the first, could be called dadaists...
As I implied, if you stretch things far enough you can find dada and
surrealism almost anywhere in all modern art. You can also find
romanticism, aestheticism, nee-classicism, impressionism, realism, and
any other -ism you care to name.
If you want real influence, though, you have to look at Yoko's interest
in Dada and how that affected John Lennon, or Allen Ginsberg's
surrealistic bent and how it affected Bob Dylan. There at least you're
dealing with influences that may have been direct and real. I doubt
you'd find anything similar in, say, the Chips' "Rubber Biscuit," even
though a careless critic might say that the song is as Dada-esque as
50s r'n'r could be.
--
--md
_________
Remove xx's from address to reply
Good points, thanks.
DianeE
2018-11-28 23:00:46 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
-------------
It's "built *for speed*."

My question is, is it still Surrealism when Pat Boone sings it?

Or is the point that Little Richard *himself* was somewhat surreal? I
might agree with the latter. You can be surreal without being a
surrealist, right?
Roger Ford
2018-11-29 05:51:59 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
-------------
It's "built *for speed*."
My question is, is it still Surrealism when Pat Boone sings it?
That line in the clean-as-a-whistle Boone version translates to

"well Long Tall Sally has a lot on the ball
And nobody cares if she's long and tall"

ROGER FORD
-----------------------

"Spam Free Zone" - to combat unwanted automatic spamming I have added
an extra "m" in my e-mail address (***@mmail.com).
Please delete same before responding.Thank you!
DianeE
2018-12-01 16:59:52 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
-------------
It's "built *for speed*."
My question is, is it still Surrealism when Pat Boone sings it?
That line in the clean-as-a-whistle Boone version translates to
"well Long Tall Sally has a lot on the ball
And nobody cares if she's long and tall"
-----------
Well, there you go--why *would* anyone care if she's long and tall?
Surrealism!
t***@iwvisp.com
2018-11-29 17:39:44 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
-------------
It's "built *for speed*."
My question is, is it still Surrealism when Pat Boone sings it?
Or is the point that Little Richard *himself* was somewhat surreal? I
might agree with the latter. You can be surreal without being a
surrealist, right?
I think it's always surreal when Pat sings anything, except Moody River.

Ray
DianeE
2018-12-01 16:58:38 UTC
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Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Is "Long Tall Sally, she's built sweet, she's got everything that Uncle John needs" Dadaism or Surrealism?
-------------
It's "built *for speed*."
My question is, is it still Surrealism when Pat Boone sings it?
Or is the point that Little Richard *himself* was somewhat surreal? I
might agree with the latter. You can be surreal without being a
surrealist, right?
I think it's always surreal when Pat sings anything, except Moody River.
-------------
Oh, I don't know; that "vainest knife" thing is like some hipster joke
from the 1920s....and accusing Muddy Waters of murder is pretty radical
too....
xpenenyx
2018-11-23 18:33:30 UTC
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On Thu, 22 Nov 2018 14:33:39 -0800 (PST), Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
You mean while you were young and White.
Post by Will Dockery
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
Yeah I'm sure that was, assuming Richard could read, while at the one
shack where he got his "education."
Post by Will Dockery
So I see it as very possible.
Will Dockery
2018-11-28 13:48:10 UTC
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Post by xpenenyx
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
Post by xpenenyx
Post by Will Dockery
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
I read those poets and many more when I was young, while working in both Harley Lumber and Carolina Lumber & Supply, and later at Cartersville Spinning Mill.
You mean while you were young and White.
Post by Will Dockery
And like Little Richard, I was in Georgia, not far from his own stomping grounds.
Yeah I'm sure that was, assuming Richard could read, while at the one
shack where he got his "education."
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
t***@iwvisp.com
2018-11-28 15:55:06 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
Will Dockery
2018-11-28 16:45:27 UTC
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Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
I don't think so, I do have the imagination and ability to make connections.
DianeE
2018-11-28 23:03:18 UTC
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Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
SavoyBG
2018-11-28 23:08:13 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Tard has become a popular suffix these days.
DianeE
2018-11-29 02:44:18 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Tard has become a popular suffix these days.
---------
Yes, but "dotard" is an older term for, shall we say, a victim of
Alzheimer's disease, and Ray combined it with "anecdote." At least
that's how I read it. Maybe you're right.
SavoyBG
2018-11-29 02:57:29 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Tard has become a popular suffix these days.
---------
Yes, but "dotard" is an older term for, shall we say, a victim of
Alzheimer's disease, and Ray combined it with "anecdote." At least
that's how I read it. Maybe you're right.
Okay, The most common one is "Libtard" that these right wing assholes call people like us.
Dennis C
2018-11-29 13:19:29 UTC
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The "tard" affixiation has been around for years.

Anyway, Ray Arthur couldn't coin his way out of a pay toilet, baby!!
SavoyBG
2018-11-29 14:17:37 UTC
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Post by Dennis C
The "tard" affixiation has been around for years.
Anyway, Ray Arthur couldn't coin his way out of a pay toilet, baby!!
Are there still pay toilets?
Bill B
2018-11-29 14:49:17 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Dennis C
The "tard" affixiation has been around for years.
Anyway, Ray Arthur couldn't coin his way out of a pay toilet, baby!!
Are there still pay toilets?
There are three in Dennis' house.
Dennis C
2018-11-29 15:58:20 UTC
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Bill just delivered an anecdoturd, baby!!!
Bill B
2018-11-29 16:30:55 UTC
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Post by Dennis C
Bill just delivered an anecdoturd, baby!!!
That's what your wife said when I brought you home drunk that time.
Bob Roman
2018-11-29 14:35:14 UTC
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Post by DianeE
Post by SavoyBG
Post by DianeE
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
You are an anecdotard.
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Tard has become a popular suffix these days.
Yes, but "dotard" is an older term for, shall we say, a victim of
Alzheimer's disease, and Ray combined it with "anecdote." At least
that's how I read it. Maybe you're right.
Yes, the word "dotard" goes back at least to Chaucer, 800 years ago. It is not a back-formation. It is older than the word "retarded" (as related to intellectual deficits) that that inspire the new slang terms that Bruce is referring to. There is no need for you to take back your compliment.

--
BR
Dennis C
2018-11-29 14:48:22 UTC
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Hey!! If it dates back to Chaucer maybe Bill Bugge coined it, baby!!
DianeE
2018-11-29 23:11:54 UTC
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Post by Bob Roman
Post by DianeE
Post by SavoyBG
Post by DianeE
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
You are an anecdotard.
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Tard has become a popular suffix these days.
Yes, but "dotard" is an older term for, shall we say, a victim of
Alzheimer's disease, and Ray combined it with "anecdote." At least
that's how I read it. Maybe you're right.
Yes, the word "dotard" goes back at least to Chaucer, 800 years ago. It is not a back-formation. It is older than the word "retarded" (as related to intellectual deficits) that that inspire the new slang terms that Bruce is referring to. There is no need for you to take back your compliment.
--
---------------
There's a word for a word that's created from two other words, but I
can't remember what it is. <thinks very very hard, then checks Google>
AHA! A *portmanteau* word! (The examples given were "motel" and "smog.")
Will Dockery
2018-11-30 16:47:44 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
---------------
There's a word for a word that's created from two other words, but I
can't remember what it is. <thinks very very hard, then checks Google>
AHA! A *portmanteau* word! (The examples given were "motel" and "smog.")
I enjoy these, and one of my own favorites was "repentative":

"Floating in a sea of bad vibes, I do these things over and over,
repentatively, feel regret but keep doing it over and over.
Then the whole thing becomes a blur..."

From the poem "Tuesday With Little Spain":

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/gzqJW6o2moY/u5yjeClvAwAJ
c***@gmail.com
2018-12-01 00:13:22 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Roger Ford
---------------
There's a word for a word that's created from two other words, but I
can't remember what it is. <thinks very very hard, then checks Google>
AHA! A *portmanteau* word! (The examples given were "motel" and "smog.")
"Floating in a sea of bad vibes, I do these things over and over,
repentatively, feel regret but keep doing it over and over.
Then the whole thing becomes a blur..."
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/gzqJW6878687o2moY/u5yjeClvAwAJ
You can leave your shit songs and poetry off this group, attention whore.
Will Dockery
2018-12-01 06:21:31 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Roger Ford
---------------
There's a word for a word that's created from two other words, but I
can't remember what it is. <thinks very very hard, then checks Google>
AHA! A *portmanteau* word! (The examples given were "motel" and "smog.")
"Floating in a sea of bad vibes, I do these things over and over,
repentatively, feel regret but keep doing it over and over.
Then the whole thing becomes a blur..."
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/gzqJW6878687o2moY/u5yjeClvAwAJ
You can leave your shit songs and poetry off this group, attention whore.
Nothing wrong with advertising my great music.
Will Dockery
2018-12-03 11:09:25 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Nothing wrong with advertising my great music.
Well, forger, when you create some, let us know.

:)

DianeE
2018-12-01 17:02:12 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Roger Ford
---------------
There's a word for a word that's created from two other words, but I
can't remember what it is. <thinks very very hard, then checks Google>
AHA! A *portmanteau* word! (The examples given were "motel" and "smog.")
"Floating in a sea of bad vibes, I do these things over and over,
repentatively, feel regret but keep doing it over and over.
Then the whole thing becomes a blur..."
------------
So, like, tentatively repenting?
Will Dockery
2018-11-29 14:45:58 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by SavoyBG
Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Tard has become a popular suffix these days.
---------
Yes, but "dotard" is an older term for, shall we say, a victim of
Alzheimer's disease, and Ray combined it with "anecdote." At least
that's how I read it. Maybe you're right.
I did check the archives, and saw that the word is a rare one:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!search/anecdotard

Search results for anecdotard Posts: 3, groups: 0

Re: LAW WOULD DISARM DOMESTIC ABUSERS - GUNLOBBY LAWYER SAYS GUNS ARE THE REAL VICTIMS, NOT PEOPLE! Group: tx.guns
And yet all of the examples on your tv show are still anecdotal, and you are an anecdotard. Laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh. An anecdotard amusing ...
6/28/05 by The Lone Weasel

Re: Early Rock-N-Roll inspired by Dadaism & Surrealists? Group: rec.music.rock-pop-r+b.1950s (Member)
... On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 6:04:29 PM UTC-5, DianeE wrote: > >> On 11/28/2018 10:55 AM, treg wrote: > >>> You are an anecdotard.
9:35 AM (5 minutes ago) by Bob Roman

Re: Release and patch sizes in perlhist Group: perl.perl5.porters
Well, *I* was trying to use it, but a singular anecdote proves nothing beyond the singularity of the anecdotard, and this is hardly new data.
9/24/08 by Tom Christiansen

-----------------------------------------------------------

So, I reckon The Lone Weasel posted the word first, a decade ago:

"An anecdotard amusing himself down at the donut shop of Usenet, TPG, making
wild claims about the riff-raff of whom he is still a member, but not openly..." -The Lone Weasel
t***@iwvisp.com
2018-11-29 17:46:55 UTC
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Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Yes. I combined the Kim Jung Un - Trump definition of 'Dotard' with 'anecdote' to describe Dockery as a bullshitting egotistical idiot that supports his unsupportable opinions with anecdotal bullshit (from the Dept. of Redundancy Dept.)

Ray
SavoyBG
2018-11-29 18:15:15 UTC
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Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Yes. I combined the Kim Jung Un - Trump definition of 'Dotard' with 'anecdote' to describe Dockery as a bullshitting egotistical idiot that supports his unsupportable opinions with anecdotal bullshit (from the Dept. of Redundancy Dept.)
Why can't Dockery be humble like Brucie?
BobbyM
2018-11-29 22:40:11 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Yes. I combined the Kim Jung Un - Trump definition of 'Dotard' with 'anecdote' to describe Dockery as a bullshitting egotistical idiot that supports his unsupportable opinions with anecdotal bullshit (from the Dept. of Redundancy Dept.)
Why can't Dockery be humble like Brucie?
"Oh, Lord,it's hard to be humble when you're perfect in every way."
Dennis C
2018-11-29 22:48:02 UTC
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Bruce and humble....put 'em together you got bumble. 'Nuf said, baby!!
z***@gmail.com
2018-11-30 00:25:45 UTC
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Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Roger Ford
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by Will Dockery
I don't know much of Little Richard's biography, but from the example of my own experiences, I see it as very possible.
You are an anecdotard.
-----------
Did you coin that word yourself? Pretty impressive IMO.
Yes. I combined the Kim Jung Un - Trump definition of 'Dotard' with 'anecdote' to describe Dockery as a bullshitting egotistical idiot that supports his unsupportable opinions with anecdotal bullshit (from the Dept. of Redundancy Dept.)
Ray
I see you know Dockery well. Be careful or he will call you an obsessed troll.
Will Dockery
2018-11-24 01:38:31 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like
Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian
hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was
on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
Perhaps you under rate Little Richard's love of poetry and art?
Will Dockery
2018-11-29 16:36:37 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like
Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian
hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
There's this:

http://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/little-richard-the-beginning-and-the-end-culmination-of-the-hip.680875/page-6

"This picture of Salvador Dali was taken immediately after Richard started his first television appearance [...] By the time Richard finished his show, Dali was twisted in knots and left the country the next morning [...] When he got back to Spain, Dali got himself a copy of Tutti Frutti and often lip-synched to it, as in this picture..."
Eric Ramon
2018-11-30 19:29:35 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like
Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian
hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
http://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/little-richard-the-beginning-and-the-end-culmination-of-the-hip.680875/page-6
"This picture of Salvador Dali was taken immediately after Richard started his first television appearance [...] By the time Richard finished his show, Dali was twisted in knots and left the country the next morning [...] When he got back to Spain, Dali got himself a copy of Tutti Frutti and often lip-synched to it, as in this picture..."
this is another example of the surrealist being influenced by the rock n roller, not the other way around.
z***@gmail.com
2018-11-30 00:23:59 UTC
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Post by SavoyBG
Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
Of course!
Everybody knows that Richard used to read surrealistic poetry when he was on break from his dish washing job at the bus station in Macon.
You stupid bastard!
Sorry that our idiot Dockery escaped alt.arts.poetry.comments.
Bob Roman
2018-11-22 21:34:22 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
As Bruce said in his sensitive way, it is very unlikely that Richard was directly or consciously influenced by Dadaism or the Surrealists. So to make this argument, the challenge is to show that either of those movements was so pervasive in the mid 20th century culture to indirectly influence him. A brief read through the page you linked doesn't seem to attempt that approach.

--
BR
Bill B
2018-11-22 23:19:05 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Little Richard shows influence from the Dada and Surrealist poets, actually.
https://books.google.com/books?id=YzI7DwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT62&ots=fQ_BUwBSc6&dq=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&pg=PT62#v=onepage&q=%22little%20richard%22%20%22dadaism%22&f=false
"Something almost – the nonsense of it – avant-garde in them, like Dadaism. ... Davies, Little Richard, Clarence 'Frogman' Henry, Mongolian hoomisinging..."
(From "The Sound of Nonsense" By Richard Elliott
In the case of Elvis, it was Mamaism.
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